Performance Aspects, Biomechanics, and Technology in Sports and Exercise

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 October 2024 | Viewed by 3200

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Split, 21000 Split, Croatia
Interests: soccer; match load; training load; physical performance; technical performance; tactical performance; performance analysis; monitoring; coaching

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Split, 21000 Split, Croatia
Interests: performance analysis; biomechanics; injuries; strength and conditioning; sport demands
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For athletes and their coaches, it is essential to understand how the body functions. It is no less important to understand how to maximize performance and reduce injuries. Understanding these aspects may bring athletes' performance to exceptional limits during sports and exercises. In this process, modern technology, which allows us to collect various kinetic and kinematic data, may be extremely helpful.

In order to improve the knowledge in the field, we are inviting the submission of manuscripts to this Special Issue on “Performance Aspects, Biomechanics, and Technology in Sports and Exercise”. This Special Issue seeks original research articles and reviews on (i) any subject related to sports and exercises, aiding to understand movements and performance, and (ii) recent advances in new sports technology. All manuscripts will be peer-reviewed by experts in the field.

Dr. Toni Modric
Dr. Sime Versic
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • kinematic analysis
  • kinetic analysis
  • performance analysis
  • diagnostics
  • movement science
  • sports science
  • coaching science
  • sports technology

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

11 pages, 1698 KiB  
Article
Repetition of the Exhaustive Wrestling-Specific Test Leads to More Effective Differentiation between Quality Categories of Youth Wrestlers
by Kreso Skugor, Hrvoje Karnincic, Nenad Zugaj, Valdemar Stajer and Barbara Gilic
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(9), 3677; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14093677 - 25 Apr 2024
Viewed by 524
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate whether wrestlers of different competitive qualities (i.e., medalists vs. non-medallists) would differ in terms of specific test performance and cardiac and metabolic responses after a demanding testing protocol. The research included 29 wrestlers aged 17.62 ± 1.86 years [...] Read more.
This study aimed to investigate whether wrestlers of different competitive qualities (i.e., medalists vs. non-medallists) would differ in terms of specific test performance and cardiac and metabolic responses after a demanding testing protocol. The research included 29 wrestlers aged 17.62 ± 1.86 years divided into two performance categories: successful (medallists at the National Championships; n = 13) and less successful (non-medallists; n = 16). The variables included anthropometric indices and specific wrestling fitness test (SWFT) parameters, including the number of throws, heart rate, lactate concentration and calculated cardiac and metabolic indexes. To show differences between quality categories, Student’s t-test and receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) were calculated. Two-way ANOVA for repeated measurements was used to evaluate the differences in performance, cardiac, and metabolic characteristics between the test trials and quality categories. Wrestlers differed in the total number of throws (p < 0.01, AUC = 0.82), cardiac indices (p < 0.03, AUC = 0.73), and metabolic indices (p < 0.04, AUC = 0.75) after the second SWFT trial, with successful wrestlers reaching better results. There were no differences in the first testing trial. The findings of this study indicate that wrestlers exhibit differences in specific performance variables after undergoing an exhaustive testing protocol. Therefore, this study suggests that future research on sport-specific performance in wrestlers should include exhaustive exercise or testing protocols. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 845 KiB  
Article
The Role of Physical Fitness on FRAN CrossFit® Workout Performance
by Rafaellos Polydorou, Andreas Kyriacou-Rossi, Andreas Hadjipantelis, Christos Ioannides and Nikolaos Zaras
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(8), 3317; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14083317 - 15 Apr 2024
Viewed by 464
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of physical fitness on the FRAN CrossFit® workout time-trial. Twenty male athletes were divided into a fast group (FG) and a slow group (SG) according to the median value of the FRAN [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of physical fitness on the FRAN CrossFit® workout time-trial. Twenty male athletes were divided into a fast group (FG) and a slow group (SG) according to the median value of the FRAN time-trial. Measurements included the FRAN time-trial, body composition analysis, isometric handgrip and isometric mid-thigh pull strength, countermovement jump (CMJ), 30 s continuous jumping test (CJ30), and one repetition maximum (1-RM) strength in the squat, thrusters, snatch, clean and jerk, and dead-lift. The FG had significantly lower body fat (p < 0.018), higher CMJ (p < 0.05), lower percentage decrement in CJ30 height (p = 0.023), and higher 1-RM strength (p < 0.05) compared to the SG. A significant correlation was found between the FRAN time-trial with percentage body fat (r = 0.512, p = 0.021) and with percentage decrement in CJ30 height (r = 0.454, p = 0.044). Performance in the FRAN time-trial was also correlated with CMJ variables (r ranged from 0.634 to 0.663, p < 0.05) and 1-RM strength (r ranged from 0.510 to 0.701, p < 0.05). These results suggest that the FG has a higher tolerance to fatigue and is stronger, more powerful, and has less body fat compared to the SG. Consequently, body fat, 1-RM strength, power, and anaerobic capacity may predict the FRAN time-trial in CrossFit® athletes. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 425 KiB  
Article
Cognitive and Motor Capacities Are Poorly Correlated with Agility in Early Pubertal Children: Gender-Stratified Analysis
by Vladimir Pavlinović, Nikola Foretić, Neven Kovačević, Tea Galić, Linda Lušić Kalcina, Frane Mihanović and Toni Modric
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(8), 3148; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14083148 - 9 Apr 2024
Viewed by 555
Abstract
This research aimed to identify relations of cognitive and power capacities with reactive agility in pubescent boys (n = 55) and girls (n = 46). Cognitive abilities were evaluated by the Stroop test, while the BlazePod system was used to evaluate [...] Read more.
This research aimed to identify relations of cognitive and power capacities with reactive agility in pubescent boys (n = 55) and girls (n = 46). Cognitive abilities were evaluated by the Stroop test, while the BlazePod system was used to evaluate agility performance conducting 20 yard shuttle and triangle tests of non-reactive (TCODS) and reactive agility (TRAG), respectively. Performance in jumping power was assessed through the squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), and drop jump (DHJ) utilising the Opto Jump system (Microgate, Bolzano, Italy), while sprinting ability over distances of 10 and 20 m was measured using a photocells system. A principal component was extracted from the four Stroop test variables using factor analysis. Forward stepwise multiple regression analysis was conducted separately for boys and girls to evaluate the multivariate relationships among the predictors and the criterion. Among boys, 80% of the TRAG variance was explained (MultipleR = 0.9), with TCODS and SJ as significant predictors (β = 0.53 and −1.01, respectively). For girls, the TCODS was the significant predictor (β = 0.65), explaining 43% of the variance (MultipleR = 0.65). These results show that (i) cognitive abilities measured with the Stroop test were not a reliable tool for predicting TRAG, (ii) jumping power was a significant predictor of TRAG in boys, and (iii) TCODS was a significant predictor of TRAG in girls. The findings indicated that cognitive abilities do not significantly influence reactive agility in pubescent children. It seems that power features have a greater influence on reactive agility, particularly in boys who have more developed motor skills at this age compared to girls. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 1505 KiB  
Article
Effects of Adding Mechanical Vibration and a Stick on Acceleration and Movement Variability during a Slide-Board Skating Exercise: Differences between the Dominant and Non-Dominant Legs
by Jose F. Gisbert-Orozco, Gerard Moras, Víctor Illera-Domínguez, Víctor Toro-Román, Carla Pérez-Chirinos Buxadé and Bruno Fernández-Valdés
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(4), 1481; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14041481 - 12 Feb 2024
Viewed by 618
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to analyse differences in acceleration and movement variability caused by adding whole-body vibration (WBV) and an implement (stick) while performing a slide-board (SB) skating exercise. A total of 10 professional ice-hockey players (age 20.4 ± 2.07 [...] Read more.
The aim of the present study was to analyse differences in acceleration and movement variability caused by adding whole-body vibration (WBV) and an implement (stick) while performing a slide-board (SB) skating exercise. A total of 10 professional ice-hockey players (age 20.4 ± 2.07 years) participated in the study. Participants performed 30 s of lateral sliding on a slide vibration board (SVB). Four conditions were analysed: no vibration and no stick (NVNS), no vibration with a stick (NVS), vibration without a stick (VNS) and vibration with a stick (VS). Peak acceleration, mean acceleration and movement variability (MV) were analysed in the dominant and non-dominant legs in each condition. Peak acceleration was higher in the non-dominant leg (p < 0.01). However, MV was higher in the dominant leg (p < 0.01). Regarding differences between conditions, mean acceleration was higher in VNS and VS than in NVS (p < 0.05). Regarding MV (sample entropy), there were differences in NVNS compared to VNS and VS (p < 0.01) and in NVS compared to VNS and VS (p < 0.01), with the values being superior in VNS and VS. The addition of WBV during an SB skating exercise results in an increase in MV and mean acceleration. The dominant leg shows greater MV regardless of the addition of vibration and a stick during sliding on an SVB. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 1487 KiB  
Article
Effects of Mechanical Vibration during an Incremental Slide Board Skating Test on Physiological and Movement Variability Parameters
by Jose F. Gisbert-Orozco, Gerard Moras, Víctor Toro-Román, Víctor Illera-Domínguez, Carla Pérez-Chirinos Buxadé and Bruno Fernández-Valdés
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(4), 1342; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14041342 - 6 Feb 2024
Viewed by 591
Abstract
The physiological, kinematic, and performance benefits of slide board (SB) training are well established. However, there is limited research investigating the potential effects offered by combining SB training with whole-body vibration (WBV). This study aimed to evaluate the impact of WBV on movement [...] Read more.
The physiological, kinematic, and performance benefits of slide board (SB) training are well established. However, there is limited research investigating the potential effects offered by combining SB training with whole-body vibration (WBV). This study aimed to evaluate the impact of WBV on movement variability (MV) and physiological parameters during an incremental SB skating test. Ten elite ice hockey players (20.4 ± 2.07 years; 1.79 ± 0.05 m; 75.97 ± 5.44 kg; 23.64 ± 1.64 body mass index) participated in this study. An incremental test was conducted on the SB under two conditions, randomized in order: WBV (30 Hz) and non-WBV (0 Hz). The incremental test rhythms were established at 30, 35, 40, and 45 Hz. Participants performed the exercise on the SB at each rhythm for four minutes, for a total of 16 mins. MV, subjective perception of effort (RPE), heart rate (HR), and ergospirometric parameters were assessed. Differences were observed between rhythms in ergospirometric parameters and HR, increasing directly with rhythm (p < 0.05). Regarding differences between conditions, MV was higher when the incremental test was performed with WBV (p < 0.01). The addition of WBV during SB training resulted in a rise in MV without affecting physiological parameters. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop