Incorporation of Advanced Molecular Techniques in Food Quality Control and Safety

A special issue of Applied Microbiology (ISSN 2673-8007).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 2388

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Dairy Research, Institute of Technology of Agricultural Products, Hellenic Agricultural Organization “DEMETER”, Ethnikis Antistaseos 3, 45221 Ioannina, Greece
Interests: molecular microbiology; bioinformatics; ecology of fermented foods; food safety and quality control; foodborne pathogens; predictive microbiology; microbial risk assessment; statistical process and quality control; udder health of ruminants; dairy farming precision
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Dairy Research, Institute of Technology of Agricultural Products, Hellenic Agricultural Organization “DIMITRA”, Ethnikis Antistaseos 3, 45221 Ioannina, Greece
Interests: dairy technology; dairy microbiology; probiotics; fermented food technology; fermentation processes and bioprocesses
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The microbial community of foods is a group of microbes that live in the food matrix, interacting with each other and with the environment. Raw foods, especially those of animal origin, contain a variety of microbes from microorganisms with technological/industrial interest to undesirable foodborne pathogens. One type of product with great value and appreciation by consumers are fermented products. During the fermentation process, microorganisms play a critical role for their quality and safety. Currently, the vast explosion of high-throughput molecular methods, e.g., next-generation sequencing, and mathematical modeling techniques, e.g., predictive microbiology or source attribution, has made the detailed investigation of microbial ecology of foods and their safety possible.

The Special Issue supports the submission of original research or review papers dealing with the microbial community of fermented (meat, dairy, sourdough, vegetables, and wine) and non-fermented (meat, including poultry, and dairy) foods to underpin food business operators in the control of quality and safety of their products. Manuscripts addressing the following topics will be considered for publication: study of the ecology of fermented and non-fermented foods, including starter culture investigation, based on molecular techniques (whole genome sequencing, metataxonomics, shotgun metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, and PCR-based techniques), metabolomics, predictive modeling, and bioinformatics, including the integration of different omics disciplines. In addition, manuscripts addressing the epidemiological investigation, phylogeny relationship, subtyping (MLST, MLVA, cgMLST/wgMLST, cgSNP/wgMLST), and antimicrobial resistance of foodborne pathogens based on molecular techniques (whole genome sequencing and PCR-based methods) as well as mathematical modeling (predictive microbiology and source attribution) and bioinformatics (genome characterization and comparative genomics) are also welcomed.

Dr. Marios Mataragas
Dr. Loulouda Bosnea
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Microbiology is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

13 pages, 2159 KiB  
Article
Selection of Listeria monocytogenes InlA-Binding Peptides Using Phage Display—Novel Compounds for Diagnostic Applications?
by Julia Kenzel, Dagmar Adeline Brüggemann and Susanne Aileen Funke
Appl. Microbiol. 2022, 2(4), 921-933; https://doi.org/10.3390/applmicrobiol2040070 - 10 Nov 2022
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Abstract
Listeria monocytogenes is a pathogenic, gram-positive bacterium causing foodborne infections and listeriosis, an infection responsible for serious medical conditions, especially for pregnant women, newborns, or people with a weak immune system. Even after antibiotic treatment, 30% of clinical infections result in death. L. [...] Read more.
Listeria monocytogenes is a pathogenic, gram-positive bacterium causing foodborne infections and listeriosis, an infection responsible for serious medical conditions, especially for pregnant women, newborns, or people with a weak immune system. Even after antibiotic treatment, 30% of clinical infections result in death. L. monocytogenes is able to enter and multiply in mammalian cells. Invasion into epithelial cells in the human intestine is mediated by the interaction of the bacterial surface protein internalin A (InlA) with the host cell receptor E-cadherin (E-cad). We have used phage display to select InlA-specific peptides consisting of 12 amino acids using a randomized, recombinant peptide library. We could demonstrate that the selected peptides bound to recombinant InlA protein as well as to L. monocytogenes cells. In vitro, some of the peptides inhibited the interaction between recombinant InlA and human E-cad. As far as we know, this is the first publication on the development of InlA-specific peptide ligands. In the future, our peptides might be used for the development of innovative diagnostic tools or even therapeutic approaches. Full article
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