Topic Editors

Department of Dairy Research, Institute of Technology of Agricultural Products, Hellenic Agricultural Organization “DEMETER”, Ethnikis Antistaseos 3, 45221 Ioannina, Greece
Department of Dairy Research, Institute of Technology of Agricultural Products, Hellenic Agricultural Organization “DIMITRA”, Ethnikis Antistaseos 3, 45221 Ioannina, Greece

Improving the Added Value of Raw Milk and Dairy Products through Innovative Tools and Techniques

Abstract submission deadline
closed (30 June 2023)
Manuscript submission deadline
closed (30 June 2023)
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13717

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Milk is a highly appreciated and nutritious food. However, infectious diseases (e.g., mastitis) and the presence or growth of undesirable microorganisms cause significant losses of milk production and animal illness. In addition, mastitis and undesirable microorganisms are responsible for milk quality problems that impact the flavor, safety, and shelf life of dairy products. Therefore, both issues have important economic consequences. On the other hand, lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which represent the dominant population of milk, have a positive impact on the quality and safety of the final products through fermentation. Methods of detecting clinical or subclinical mastitis are mainly applied at the animal level and less at the herd level. The current approach for the prevention or treatment of disease is based on the administration of antibiotics. This approach, however, has a high cost and often does not have the desired results because of microorganisms’ resistance to antibiotics (AMR). Therefore, there is a need for alternatives capable of controlling mastitis in a natural way, contributing at the same time to the sustainability of the dairy farm business. Consequently, articles (review and original papers) dealing with tools, methods or techniques (microbiological, molecular including omics, and statistical including bioinformatics) that allow disease surveillance and prevention (control), rapid detection of subclinical mastitis cases and causative agents, epidemiology, prediction and modeling of the disease, precision dairy farming related to milk production and udder health, characterization of pathogens (foodborne and mastitis-related) including their antimicrobial resistance, detection of microbial populations found in milk and dairy products, contribution/impact of specific microbes to/on quality and safety of dairy products, and modeling of microbial population in milk or dairy products are welcome for submission in this Special Issue.

Dr. Marios Mataragas
Dr. Loulouda Bosnea
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • udder health
  • mastitis
  • omics
  • lactic acid bacteria
  • modelling
  • quality and safety
  • fermentation
  • pathogens
  • preventive measures
  • precision dairy farming

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Applied Microbiology
applmicrobiol
- - 2021 13.3 Days CHF 1000
Dairy
dairy
- 2.4 2020 24.6 Days CHF 1200
Foods
foods
5.2 5.8 2012 13.1 Days CHF 2900
Pathogens
pathogens
3.7 5.1 2012 16.4 Days CHF 2700
Animals
animals
3.0 4.2 2011 18.1 Days CHF 2400

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Published Papers (6 papers)

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39 pages, 10221 KiB  
Article
Ascertaining the Influence of Lacto-Fermentation on Changes in Bovine Colostrum Amino and Fatty Acid Profiles
by Vytautė Starkutė, Ernestas Mockus, Dovilė Klupšaitė, Eglė Zokaitytė, Saulius Tušas, Ramutė Mišeikienė, Rolandas Stankevičius, João Miguel Rocha and Elena Bartkienė
Animals 2023, 13(19), 3154; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13193154 - 09 Oct 2023
Viewed by 778
Abstract
The aim of this study was to collect samples of bovine colostrum (BCOL) from different sources (agricultural companies A, B, C, D and E) in Lithuania and to ascertain the influence of lacto-fermentation with Lactiplantibacillus plantarum strain 135 and Lacticaseibacillus paracasei strain 244 [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to collect samples of bovine colostrum (BCOL) from different sources (agricultural companies A, B, C, D and E) in Lithuania and to ascertain the influence of lacto-fermentation with Lactiplantibacillus plantarum strain 135 and Lacticaseibacillus paracasei strain 244 on the changes in bovine colostrum amino (AA), biogenic amine (BA), and fatty acid (FA) profiles. It was established that the source of the bovine colostrum, the used LAB, and their interaction had significant effects (p < 0.05) on AA contents; lactic acid bacteria (LAB) used for fermentation was a significant factor for aspartic acid, threonine, glycine, alanine, methionine, phenylalanine, lysine, histidine, and tyrosine; and these factor’s interaction is significant on most of the detected AA concentrations. Total BA content showed significant correlations with glutamic acid, serine, aspartic acid, valine, methionine, phenylalanine, histidine, and gamma amino-butyric acid content in bovine colostrum. Despite the differences in individual FA contents in bovine colostrum, significant differences were not found in total saturated (SFA), monounsaturated (MUFA), and polyunsaturated (PUFA) fatty acids. Finally, the utilization of bovine colostrum proved to be challenging because of the variability on its composition. These results suggest that processing bovine colostrum into value-added formulations for human consumption requires the adjustment of its composition since the primary production stage. Consequently, animal rearing should be considered in the employed bovine colostrum processing technologies. Full article
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16 pages, 3226 KiB  
Article
Genome-Wide Signal Selection Analysis Revealing Genes Potentially Related to Sheep-Milk-Production Traits
by Ruonan Li, Yuhetian Zhao, Benmeng Liang, Yabin Pu, Lin Jiang and Yuehui Ma
Animals 2023, 13(10), 1654; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13101654 - 16 May 2023
Viewed by 1448
Abstract
Natural selection and domestication have shaped modern sheep populations into a vast range of phenotypically diverse breeds. Among these breeds, dairy sheep have a smaller population than meat sheep and wool sheep, and less research is performed on them, but the lactation mechanism [...] Read more.
Natural selection and domestication have shaped modern sheep populations into a vast range of phenotypically diverse breeds. Among these breeds, dairy sheep have a smaller population than meat sheep and wool sheep, and less research is performed on them, but the lactation mechanism in dairy sheep is critically important for improving animal-production methods. In this study, whole-genome sequences were generated from 10 sheep breeds, including 57 high-milk-yield sheep and 44 low-milk-yield sheep, to investigate the genetic signatures of milk production in dairy sheep, and 59,864,820 valid SNPs (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) were kept after quality control to perform population-genetic-structure analyses, gene-detection analyses, and gene-function-validation analyses. For the population-genetic-structure analyses, we carried out PCA (Principal Component Analysis), as well as neighbor-joining tree and structure analyses to classify different sheep populations. The sheep used in our study were well distributed in ten groups, with the high-milk-yield-group populations close to each other and the low-milk-yield-group populations showing similar classifications. To perform an exact signal-selection analysis, we used three different methods to find SNPs to perform gene-annotation analyses within the 995 common regions derived from the fixation index (FST), nucleotide diversity (Ɵπ), and heterozygosity rate (ZHp) results. In total, we found 553 genes that were located in these regions. These genes mainly participate in the protein-binding pathway and the nucleoplasm-interaction pathway, as revealed by the GO- and KEGG-function-enrichment analyses. After the gene selection and function analyses, we found that FCGR3A, CTSK, CTSS, ARNT, GHR, SLC29A4, ROR1, and TNRC18 were potentially related to sheep-milk-production traits. We chose the strongly selected genes, FCGR3A, CTSK, CTSS, and ARNT during the signal-selection analysis to perform a RT-qPCR (Reale time Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction) experiment to validate their expression-level relationship with milk production, and the results showed that FCGR3A has a significant negative relationship with sheep-milk production, while other three genes did not show any positive or negative relations. In this study, it was discovered and proven that the candidate gene FCGR3A potentially contributes to the milk production of dairy sheep and a basis was laid for the further study of the genetic mechanism underlying the strong milk-production traits of sheep. Full article
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15 pages, 3536 KiB  
Article
Characterization of Cow, Goat, and Water Buffalo Milk Fat Globule Lipids by High-Performance Thin Layer Chromatography
by Ayushi Kapoor, Aparna Verma and Kiran Ambatipudi
Dairy 2023, 4(1), 200-214; https://doi.org/10.3390/dairy4010014 - 22 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2682
Abstract
Ruminant milk is an essential part of the human diet and is widely accepted as a major nutrient source in developing countries. However, the polar and neutral lipid content variation in milk fat globules (MFG)among cow, goat, and water buffalo is poorly understood. [...] Read more.
Ruminant milk is an essential part of the human diet and is widely accepted as a major nutrient source in developing countries. However, the polar and neutral lipid content variation in milk fat globules (MFG)among cow, goat, and water buffalo is poorly understood. This study used high-performance thin layer chromatography to identify and quantify five major polar (PL) and three neutral lipids (NL) from the MFG of cow, goat, and water buffalo. Optimal separation was achieved for PLs using chloroform: methanol: water (65:25:4), and hexane: diethyl ether: acetic acid (70:30:1) for NLs. The lower detectable (0.12 to 1.53 μg/mL) and quantification (0.12 to 1.53 μg/mL) limits indicated the high sensitivity of the method. Quantification at 540 nm showed the highest abundance of phosphatidylethanolamine and triglycerides. Fat globules were further characterized for size and microstructural properties, which revealed smaller globules in goats (0.99 ± 0.04 μm) than cows (1.85 ± 0.03 μm) and water buffaloes (2.91 ± 0.08 μm), indicating a negative correlation with PL but a positive correlation with NL. The variation in lipid quantity among different animal species suggests more research to support their selection as a suitable source for developing functional food to impact human health positively. Full article
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10 pages, 1037 KiB  
Brief Report
Assessment of Different Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Agro-Industrial Residues: First Report of the Potential Role of Weissella soli for Lactic Acid Production from Milk Whey
by Jéssica Montero-Zamora, Silvia Fernández-Fernández, Mauricio Redondo-Solano, Beatriz Mazón-Villegas, José Aníbal Mora-Villalobos and Natalia Barboza
Appl. Microbiol. 2022, 2(3), 626-635; https://doi.org/10.3390/applmicrobiol2030048 - 29 Aug 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2049
Abstract
The production of lactic acid (LA) through the microbial conversion of agro-industrial residuals is an important process in the biotechnology industry. The growth kinetics of 30 strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from agro-industrial residues were determined and nine strains were selected [...] Read more.
The production of lactic acid (LA) through the microbial conversion of agro-industrial residuals is an important process in the biotechnology industry. The growth kinetics of 30 strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from agro-industrial residues were determined and nine strains were selected for microbioreactor fermentation. Lactiplantibacillus pentosus_70-1 (1.662) and L. pentosus_19-2 (1.563) showed the highest OD600 values, whereas the highest growth rates were observed for L. pentosus_19-2 (0.267 h−1) and Weissella soli_31 (0.256 h−1). The production of LA and acetic acid (AA), glucose consumption, and metabolic profiles were determined, without finding significant differences in the production of LA; however, W. soli_29 produced the highest amount of LA (20.833 gL−1) and was able to metabolize most of the studied carbohydrates. Based on these results, W. soli_29 was chosen for a 20 h fermentation in a 7 L bioreactor using both standard medium and milk whey supplemented medium. W. soli_29 produced 16.27 gL−1 and 7.21 gL−1 of LA in each of these mediums, respectively. These results show the underlying potential of Weissella strains for biotechnological applications. Additional analysis which should contemplate different agro-industrial residues and other conditions in bioreactors must be carried out. Full article
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13 pages, 2311 KiB  
Article
Assessing Compositional and Quality Parameters of Unconcentrated and Refractive Window Concentrated Milk Based on Color Components
by Asaad R. Al-Hilphy, Haider I. Ali, Sajedah A. Al-IEssa, Mohsen Gavahian and Amin Mousavi-Khaneghah
Dairy 2022, 3(2), 400-412; https://doi.org/10.3390/dairy3020030 - 08 Jun 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2198
Abstract
In this study, a multiple linear regression equation was developed to measure and predict quality parameters of unconcentrated and concentrated milk based on color components. The viscosity, density, pH, moisture, and fat content could be measured using image processing technology. The multiple linear [...] Read more.
In this study, a multiple linear regression equation was developed to measure and predict quality parameters of unconcentrated and concentrated milk based on color components. The viscosity, density, pH, moisture, and fat content could be measured using image processing technology. The multiple linear regression model had a good fitting on experimental data considering the limited errors (0.00–1.12%), standard deviation (0.000–0.043), and root mean square error (0.0007–0.3721). Therefore, these models can be used to predict the quality parameters of milk, including fat percentage, pH, viscosity, density, and moisture content, based on color components of unconcentrated and concentrated milk. The maximum and minimum of color change were 12.28 and 5.96, respectively. The values of browning index were also well-predicted and were within the standard limits. The non-destructive and quick procedure that proposed in this study showed a percentage of accuracy in assessing and predicting the quality parameters milk based on color components. Overall, the color correlates with different compositional and physical characteristics, and provide a possible internet of things (IoT)-based approach to accompany the conventional approaches in the future after further evaluation at large scale for various types of milks subjected to various processes. Full article
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14 pages, 1427 KiB  
Article
Effects of Monascus on Proteolysis, Lipolysis, and Volatile Compounds of Camembert-Type Cheese during Ripening
by Shuwen Zhang, Tong Wang, Yumeng Zhang, Bo Song, Xiaoyang Pang and Jiaping Lv
Foods 2022, 11(11), 1662; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11111662 - 06 Jun 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2349
Abstract
In order to improve the flavor and taste of Camembert cheese, the use of Monascus as an adjunct starter for the production of Camembert-type cheese was studied to investigate its effect on the proteolysis, lipolysis, and volatile compounds during ripening for 40 days. [...] Read more.
In order to improve the flavor and taste of Camembert cheese, the use of Monascus as an adjunct starter for the production of Camembert-type cheese was studied to investigate its effect on the proteolysis, lipolysis, and volatile compounds during ripening for 40 days. The Camembert cheese without Monascus was used as a control. The results showed that proteolytic and lipolytic activities increased to a certain extent. The addition of Monascus promoted primary and secondary proteolysis, due to the release of some proteases by Monascus. Aspartic, Threonine, Glutamic, Glycine, Methione, Isoleucine, Phenyalanine, and Lysine contents in experimental group (R) cheese were significantly higher than those in control group (W) cheeses. In addition, the free amino acid and fatty acid contents were also affected. The identification of flavor components using gas-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) showed that 2-undecone, 2-tridecanone, phenylethyl alcohol, butanediol (responsible for the production of flowery and honey-like aroma), ethyl hexanoate, ethyl octanoate, and ethyl citrate (fruit-like aroma) were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in the experimental cheeses than in the control. The contents of 2-nonanone, 2-octanone and 2-decanone (showing milky flavor), and 1-octene-3 alcohol with typical mushroom-like flavor were lower than the control. Full article
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