The One Health Strategy in Antimicrobial Resistance and Antimicrobial Use Surveillance Programs

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Antibiotics Use and Antimicrobial Stewardship".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2023) | Viewed by 8820

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Public Health Policy, School of Public Health, University of West Attica, 115 21 Athens, Greece
Interests: antimicrobial resistance; hospital acquired infection; epidemiology; public health microbiology

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Public Health Policy, School of Public Health, University of West Attica, 115 21 Athens, Greece
Interests: food-borne pathogens; antibiotic resistance; Public Health Microbiology
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bacterial resistance to Antibiotics (AMR) is considered to be a growing, highly important public health issue in most parts of the world mainly in hospitalized patients. However, there is growing evidence that AMR is an issue that involves all biosphere of the planet including animals (domestic and wildlife) as well as the environment. Antibiotic resistance genes and antibiotic residues have been found in animals, in wastewater, as well as in lakes and rivers. The transfer of resistance genes into the human community has been also observed: The use of avoparcin (a vancomycin analog) in animals in Europe in the 90s was a well-documented risk factor for the spread of Vancomycin-resistant Enterococci in humans. The spread of the ESBL genes of the CTX-M family in humans through the food chain is also extensively studied. More recently, the international spread of the mcr family of genes that confirms resistance to colistin from the pig farms in China is under scrutiny by Public Health and Veterinary organizations internationally. Understanding and combating AMR definitely needs the One Health approach, the close collaboration of scientists working in numerous fields such as Health, Biology, Environmental Sciences, and Veterinary medicine. Especially surveillance of AMR and antibiotic use, being the prerequisite of any strategy against AMR, can only be successful if based on the gathering and coordinated analysis of data from the various departments (Human, Animal and Environment) in close collaboration

Therefore, this Special Issue welcomes collaborative submissions from different research fields that further study and clarify all the aspects of Antimicrobial Resistance and Antimicrobial Use Surveillance Programs with special reference to the coordination of surveillance in all departments.

Prof. Dr. Alkiviadis Vatopoulos
Dr. Georgia Mandilara
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Surveillance
  • Antibiotic Resistance
  • gene transfer
  • antibiotic resistance surveillance
  • antibiotic resistance in animals
  • antibiotic resistance and one health
  • Lactamases
  • resistance gene
  • antibiotic resistance in the environment
  • AMR and food chain
  • AMR and big data
  • Molecular Surveillance
  • Antibiotic in Animals
  • Antibiotic residues

Published Papers (6 papers)

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20 pages, 1068 KiB  
Article
Using a Stakeholder Analysis to Implement the Belgian One Health National Report for Antimicrobial Use and Resistance
by Mickaël Cargnel, Moira Kelly, Hein Imberechts, Boudewijn Catry and Maria-Eleni Filippitzi
Antibiotics 2024, 13(1), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics13010084 - 16 Jan 2024
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Abstract
(1) Background. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) poses a substantial global health threat with profound economic implications. Acknowledging the imperative for a One Health (OH) strategy to combat this menace, Belgium introduced an annual national OH report, known as the “BELMAP report,” encompassing antimicrobial use [...] Read more.
(1) Background. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) poses a substantial global health threat with profound economic implications. Acknowledging the imperative for a One Health (OH) strategy to combat this menace, Belgium introduced an annual national OH report, known as the “BELMAP report,” encompassing antimicrobial use (AMU) and AMR, with the first edition completed in 2021. The integration of innovations for the healthcare system demands a meticulously planned process. (2) Methods. We introduced a three-step stakeholder analysis (SA) as a prospective framework for navigating this new report process, fostering complementary collaboration, pinpointing obstacles, suggesting approaches to overcome them, and facilitating national policy development. The SA unfolds in three steps: stakeholders identify and list their relevant activities, assess their positions regarding the BELMAP report, and complete “actor mapping” of national AMR and AMU stakeholders. (3) Results. Stakeholder identification reveals a fragmented landscape of AMR and AMU activities across Belgium. Assessment of stakeholder positions uncovers diverse expectations, collaborative challenges, and resource considerations. “Actor mapping” identifies key stakeholders, emphasizing the importance of high-interest and high-power actors. (4) Conclusions. This SA approach not only provides insights into the present stakeholder landscape in Belgium, it can also serve as a blueprint for other countries in the process of developing OH reports. Full article
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12 pages, 267 KiB  
Article
Antimicrobial Resistance in Escherichia coli Isolated from Healthy Dogs and Cats in South Korea, 2020–2022
by Bo-Youn Moon, Md. Sekendar Ali, Dong-Hyeon Kwon, Ye-Eun Heo, Yu-Jeong Hwang, Ji-In Kim, Yun Jin Lee, Soon-Seek Yoon, Dong-Chan Moon and Suk-Kyung Lim
Antibiotics 2024, 13(1), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics13010027 - 27 Dec 2023
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Abstract
The occurrence of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in companion animals poses public health hazards globally. This study aimed to evaluate the antimicrobial resistance profiles and patterns of commensal E. coli strains obtained from fecal samples of healthy dogs and cats in South Korea between 2020 [...] Read more.
The occurrence of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in companion animals poses public health hazards globally. This study aimed to evaluate the antimicrobial resistance profiles and patterns of commensal E. coli strains obtained from fecal samples of healthy dogs and cats in South Korea between 2020 and 2022. In total, 843 E. coli isolates (dogs, n = 637, and cats, n = 206) were assessed for susceptibility to 20 antimicrobials. The resistance rates of the most tested antimicrobials were significantly higher in dog than in cat isolates. Cefalexin (68.9%) demonstrated the highest resistance rates, followed by ampicillin (38.3%), tetracycline (23.1%), and cefazolin (18.7%). However, no or very low resistance (0–0.6%) to amikacin, imipenem, piperacillin, and colistin was found in both dog and cat isolates. Overall, 42.3% of the isolates exhibited multidrug resistance (MDR). MDR in isolates from dogs (34.9%) was significantly higher than in those from cats (20.9%). The main components of the resistance patterns were cefalexin and ampicillin in both dog and cat isolates. Additionally, MDR patterns in isolates from dogs (29.2%) and cats (16%) were shown to encompass five or more antimicrobials. Multidrug-resistant commensal E. coli could potentially be spread to humans or other animals through clonal or zoonotic transmission. Therefore, the incidence of antimicrobial resistance in companion animals highlights the urgent need to restrict antimicrobial resistance and ensure the prudent use of antimicrobials in Korea. Full article
11 pages, 719 KiB  
Article
Surveillance of Multidrug-Resistant Pathogens in Neonatal Intensive Care Units of Palermo, Italy, during SARS-CoV-2 Pandemic
by Giorgio Graziano, Veronica Notarbartolo, Walter Priano, Carmelo Massimo Maida, Vincenzo Insinga, Grazia Rinaudo, Arianna Russo, Roberta Palermo, Francesco Vitale and Mario Giuffrè
Antibiotics 2023, 12(9), 1457; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics12091457 - 19 Sep 2023
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Abstract
Background: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a topic of concern, especially in high-level care departments like neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The systematic use of an “active” epidemiological surveillance system allows us to observe and analyze any changes in microbial distribution, limiting the risk [...] Read more.
Background: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a topic of concern, especially in high-level care departments like neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The systematic use of an “active” epidemiological surveillance system allows us to observe and analyze any changes in microbial distribution, limiting the risk of healthcare-associated infection (HAI) development. Methods: We have conducted a longitudinal observational study in the five NICUs of Palermo, comparing the “pre-pandemic period” (March 2014–February 2020) with the “pandemic” one (March 2020–February 2022). The primary aim of the study was to evaluate the cumulative prevalence of carriage from multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria in the cumulative NICUs (NICU C). Results: During the “pre-pandemic period”, 9407 swabs were collected (4707 rectal, 4700 nasal); on the contrary, during the “pandemic period”, a total of 2687 swabs were collected (1345 rectal, 1342 nasal). A statistically significant decrease in MDR-Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) carriage prevalence was detected during the pandemic. At the same time, there was a general worsening of the carriage of carbapenemase-forming MDR-GNB (CARBA-R+) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) during the pandemic period. A significant reduction in methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) carriage was detected too. Conclusions: The surveillance of MDRO carriage in NICUs is fundamental for limiting the social and economic burden of HAIs. Full article
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12 pages, 2221 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of the One Health-Ness of 20 Years of Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance in Norway
by Madelaine Norström, Gunnar Skov Simonsen, Jannice Schau Slettemeås, Anne-Sofie Furberg and Anne Margrete Urdahl
Antibiotics 2023, 12(7), 1080; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics12071080 - 21 Jun 2023
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Abstract
We evaluated the One Health-ness (OH-ness) of the surveillance system for antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Norway by using the recently developed “Evaluation tool for One Health epidemiological surveillance capacities and capabilities” (OH–EpiCap tool). First, we defined the Norwegian AMR surveillance system that we [...] Read more.
We evaluated the One Health-ness (OH-ness) of the surveillance system for antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Norway by using the recently developed “Evaluation tool for One Health epidemiological surveillance capacities and capabilities” (OH–EpiCap tool). First, we defined the Norwegian AMR surveillance system that we would evaluate. The tool was applied by a group of stakeholders (key persons in the Norwegian AMR surveillance programmes and authors of this paper). The evaluation was performed using a consensus approach. The evaluation resulted in an overall OH-ness score of 68% across all three dimensions included in the tool: Organisation, Operation, and Impact. Suggestions for improvement were only indicated within the areas of internal evaluation and operational costs, whereas most of the indicators included in the tool showed good adherence to the One Health principles. By performing this internal evaluation, we recognized that AMR surveillance in the environment needs to be included in a more systematic and standardized way to improve the OH-ness as defined by the quadripartite organisations. Last but not least, it was beneficial to bring key stakeholders together to conduct the evaluation. It increased a joint perception of the OH-ness of AMR surveillance in Norway and encouraged further collaboration in the future. Full article
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12 pages, 964 KiB  
Article
Molecular Detection of Tetracycline-Resistant Genes in Multi-Drug-Resistant Escherichia coli Isolated from Broiler Meat in Bangladesh
by Gazi Sofiul Alam, Mohammad Mahmudul Hassan, Md. Ahaduzzaman, Chandan Nath, Pronesh Dutta, Hamida Khanom, Shahneaz Ali Khan, Md Ridoan Pasha, Ariful Islam, Ricardo Soares Magalhaes and Rowland Cobbold
Antibiotics 2023, 12(2), 418; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics12020418 - 20 Feb 2023
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Abstract
This study aimed to estimate the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) patterns and tetracycline-resistant gene profiles of Escherichia coli (E. coli) from broiler meat and livers sourced from live bird markets (LBMs) and supermarkets (SMs) in Chattogram, Bangladesh. In total, 405 samples were [...] Read more.
This study aimed to estimate the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) patterns and tetracycline-resistant gene profiles of Escherichia coli (E. coli) from broiler meat and livers sourced from live bird markets (LBMs) and supermarkets (SMs) in Chattogram, Bangladesh. In total, 405 samples were collected from SMs and LBMs, comprising muscle (n = 215) and liver (n = 190) samples. Disc diffusion tests were used to determine antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. PCR was used to identify E. coli and tetracycline-resistant genes. Over half (57%) of the chicken product samples were positive for E. coli. The AMR profiling of these isolates showed that the highest prevalence of resistance was against sulphamethoxazole–trimethoprim (89%), followed by tetracycline (87%), ampicillin (83%), and ciprofloxacin (61%). Among the antimicrobials listed by the World Health Organization as critically important, E. coli isolates were found to be resistant to cephalexin (37%), gentamicin (32%), and colistin sulfate (21%). A large proportion of E. coli demonstrated multi-drug resistance (MDR). Most (84%) of the tetracycline-resistant isolates encoded tetA. Of the remaining isolates, 0.5% encoded tetC, 6.0% encoded two genes, and 3.6% of isolates were tetD, which was newly identified by this study in Bangladesh. Broiler products in Bangladesh are frequently contaminated with multi-drug-resistant E. coli, with differential carriage of tetracycline genes. The prevalence of tetracycline resistance among E. coli indicates a concern for poultry health and welfare regarding the management of colibacillosis. It also indicates growing public health risks of AMR among broiler-associated pathogens, which can be transferred to humans via the food chain. Appropriate control measures should be developed and implemented, focused on the rational use of antimicrobials in poultry farming systems, to mitigate risk from this drug-resistant zoonotic pathogen from foods of animal origin and to protect public health. Full article
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13 pages, 601 KiB  
Perspective
Building the National Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance Network in Animals in Greece: A “One Health” Approach
by Christos Zafeiridis, George Valiakos, Panagiota Giakoupi and Emmanouil Papadogiannakis
Antibiotics 2023, 12(9), 1442; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics12091442 - 13 Sep 2023
Viewed by 981
Abstract
It is widely accepted that, in order to prevent and control antimicrobial resistance (AMR), surveillance systems across human, animal and environmental sectors need to be integrated, in a One Health approach. Currently, in Europe, there are surveillance networks established only for the human [...] Read more.
It is widely accepted that, in order to prevent and control antimicrobial resistance (AMR), surveillance systems across human, animal and environmental sectors need to be integrated, in a One Health approach. Currently, in Europe, there are surveillance networks established only for the human and food sector and, until now, there has been no organized effort to monitor AMR in bacterial pathogens derived from diseased animals in Europe. Since 2017, efforts to fill this gap have taken place by the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance network in a veterinary medicine (EARS-Vet) initiative, included in the EU Joint Action on AMR and Healthcare-Associated Infections (EU-JAMRAI). EARS-Vet is designed to complement and integrate with existing European monitoring systems for AMR as well as constitute a European network of national monitoring systems. As Greece has no national AMR surveillance system for pathogens of animal origin currently in place, in the context of the development of EARS-Vet, an initiative took place for the organization of such a system by competent agencies and other stakeholders. In this article, the steps to organize a first AMR national surveillance network in Greece are presented and a Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) analysis is performed to present main characteristics of the approach implemented. Full article
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