The Role of Alimentary Factors Used in Animal Diets on Gut Microbiota and Immune Regulation

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Physiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 June 2024 | Viewed by 2148

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Animal Nutrition, Poznań University of Life Science, Wołyńska 33, 60-637 Poznań, Poland
Interests: poultry; alternative feed materials; insects as food and feed; feed additives; gut microbiota; physiological and immunological response
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Guest Editor
Department of Animal Nutrition, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Poznań University of Life Sciences, Wołyńska 33, 60-637 Poznań, Poland
Interests: pigs; monogastric nutrition; alternative protein components; GIT physiology; fermentation; biological processes; feed and food processing methods; feed additives
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Animal Nutrition, Poznań University of Life Science, Wołyńska 33, 60-637 Poznań, Poland
Interests: ruminant nutrition; feed additives; silages; tools to estimate dairy cow nutrition; dairy cows’ transition period physiology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Zoology, Laboratory of Inland Fisheries and Aquaculture, Poznań University of Life Science, Wojska Polskiego 28, 60-625 Poznań, Poland
Interests: aquaculture; fish nutrition; exotic pets; feed additives; GIT microbiology; insects as food and feed; alternative protein processing; bone mineralization; GIT development
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In modern animal nutrition, there is a need to pay more attention not only to the growth performance results of reared animals, but also to their physiological and immunological response. This is crucial for improving animal health, which reduces pharmaceutical usage and economic losses. Consequently, the environmental impact is significantly diminished by lowering antibiotic release. It is well known that alimentary factors may affect growth, coefficients of nutrient digestibility, endogenous enzyme activity, etc. Furthermore, their mode of action causes gut microecosystem modulation and further changes in the physiological response and the alimentary system’s integrity. Currently, many novel feed materials (insects, algae, fermentation products, etc.) and feed additives (bacteriocins, bacteriophages, postbiotics, etc.) are used in the experimental conditions; however, there are still limited data in terms of their effect on the physiology and health of the animals. Therefore, the latest scientific knowledge should be widely available and rapidly transferred to field conditions to exhibit positive effects.

The goal of this Special Issue is to exhibit any solutions connected to feeding programs, specific products such as feedstuffs, and feed additives used in animal nutrition that may improve animal health, physiological and immunological status, gut integrity, histomorphology, the efficiency of nutrient utilization, and consequently, growth performance and economic profit. We invite you to publish original scientific articles as well as review papers to expand the current knowledge in the field.

The main aims of the Special Issue include:

  • Implementation of various alternative feed materials in animal nutrition;
  • Feed additive administration to improve growth performance;
  • Assessment of alimentary factors in terms of the physiological and immunological response of animals;
  • The usage of non-GMO feed materials in animal nutrition;
  • Production of alternative feedstuffs;
  • Technological processes to improve feed quality.

We encourage you to share new information about the effects of various dietary factors in animal diets on gut microbiota modulation and immunological and physiological responses.

Dr. Bartosz Kierończyk
Dr. Anita Zaworska-Zakrzewska
Dr. Robert Mikuła
Dr. Mateusz Rawski
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • alimentary factors
  • feed additives
  • alternative feed materials
  • animal health
  • gut microbiota modulation
  • immunological and physiological response

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

19 pages, 3588 KiB  
Article
Combined Dietary Administration of Chlorella fusca and Ethanol-Inactivated Vibrio proteolyticus Modulates Intestinal Microbiota and Gene Expression in Chelon labrosus
by Jorge García-Márquez, Daniel Álvarez-Torres, Isabel M. Cerezo, Marta Domínguez-Maqueda, Félix L. Figueroa, Francisco Javier Alarcón, Gabriel Acién, Eduardo Martínez-Manzanares, Roberto T. Abdala-Díaz, Julia Béjar and Salvador Arijo
Animals 2023, 13(21), 3325; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13213325 - 26 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1619
Abstract
The use of functional feeds in aquaculture is currently increasing. This study aimed to assess the combined impact of dietary green microalgae Chlorella fusca and ethanol-inactivated Vibrio proteolyticus DCF12.2 (CVP diet) on thick-lipped grey mullet (Chelon labrosus) juvenile fish. The effects [...] Read more.
The use of functional feeds in aquaculture is currently increasing. This study aimed to assess the combined impact of dietary green microalgae Chlorella fusca and ethanol-inactivated Vibrio proteolyticus DCF12.2 (CVP diet) on thick-lipped grey mullet (Chelon labrosus) juvenile fish. The effects on intestinal microbiota and the transcription of genes related to metabolism, stress, and the immune system were investigated after 90 days of feeding. Additionally, the fish were challenged with Aeromonas hydrophila and polyinosinic–polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) to evaluate the immune response. Microbiota analysis revealed no significant differences in alpha and beta diversity between the anterior and posterior intestinal sections of fish fed the control (CT) and CVP diets. The dominant genera varied between the groups; Pseudomonas and Brevinema were most abundant in the CVP group, whereas Brevinema, Cetobacterium, and Pseudomonas were predominant in the CT group. However, microbial functionality remained unaltered. Gene expression analysis indicated notable changes in hif3α, mhcII, abcb1, mx, and tnfα genes in different fish organs on the CVP diet. In the head kidney, gene expression variations were observed following challenges with A. hydrophila or poly I:C, with higher peak values seen in fish injected with poly I:C. Moreover, c3 mRNA levels were significantly up-regulated in the CVP group 72 h post-A. hydrophila challenge. To conclude, incorporating C. fusca with V. proteolyticus in C. labrosus diet affected the microbial species composition in the intestine while preserving its functionality. In terms of gene expression, the combined diet effectively regulated the transcription of stress and immune-related genes, suggesting potential enhancement of fish resistance against stress and infections. Full article
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