Recent Advances in Dairy Cattle Feeding and Nutrition

A special issue of Dairy (ISSN 2624-862X). This special issue belongs to the section "Dairy Animal Nutrition and Welfare".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 January 2024) | Viewed by 4301

Special Issue Editors

Veterinary Science Centre, School of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
Interests: dairy herd health and the prevention of production diseases; nutrition of the early lactation cow; nutrition of the dry cow; the protein metabolism of dairy cattle
Department of Animal Nutrition, Poznań University of Life Science, Wołyńska 33, 60-637 Poznań, Poland
Interests: ruminant nutrition; feed additives; silages; tools to estimate dairy cow nutrition; dairy cows’ transition period physiology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Traditionally, dairy cattle nutrition concentrated heavily on strategies and nutrients that resulted in the greatest level of productivity or profitability. Today, dairy production systems must still provide good productivity and profitability but also demonstrate reduced impact on the environment and good animal welfare standards. For many of us, the transport of common raw materials thousands of miles from their origin to their point of use in animal nutrition may become a thing of the past due to the carbon footprint associated with these practices and the impact on habitats and plant life in the regions where they are grown. Those involved in dairy cattle feeding and nutrition must seek innovative solutions that lessen the impact of our industry on climate change and improve animal welfare where possible. Submissions are invited for this Special Issue of Dairy in the theme ‘Recent Advances in Dairy Cattle Feeding and Nutrition’ to try and further our knowledge and develop concepts that see the field of animal nutrition make a meaningful contribution to the sustainability of our industry. Articles are invited in the area of dairy cattle feeding and nutrition that influence productivity, fertility, environmental sustainability, animal health or novel feed sources. Suggested themes for article topics are as follows:

  • The use of rumen-modifying agents for improved productivity and reduced environmental impact;
  • Novel protein sources for efficient milk protein production and reduced nitrogen excretion;
  • Advances in the nutrition of pasture-fed dairy cows;
  • Novel feeding stuffs (raw materials or by products) for inclusion in dairy cattle diets;
  • Advances in the feeding of fats or specific fatty acids to dairy cows;
  • Advances in major mineral, trace element and vitamin nutrition;
  • Comparisons of methodology for estimating energy and protein requirements for dairy cattle.

Dr. Finbar Mulligan
Dr. Robert Mikuła
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dairy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dairy cow
  • nutrition
  • feeding
  • lactation
  • ruminant

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

12 pages, 277 KiB  
Article
2-Hydroxy-4-(Methylthio)-Mutanoate Supplementation Affects Production, Milk Fatty Acid Profile, and Blood Metabolites of High-Producing Holstein Cows
Dairy 2024, 5(1), 66-77; https://doi.org/10.3390/dairy5010006 - 09 Jan 2024
Viewed by 529
Abstract
The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of supplementing the diet of high-producing Holstein cows with 2-hydroxy-4-(methylthio)-butanoate (HMTBa) on their milk production and composition, milk fatty acid profile, blood metabolites, and body parameters. The study was conducted in a commercial [...] Read more.
The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of supplementing the diet of high-producing Holstein cows with 2-hydroxy-4-(methylthio)-butanoate (HMTBa) on their milk production and composition, milk fatty acid profile, blood metabolites, and body parameters. The study was conducted in a commercial dairy herd in Paraná State, Southern Brazil. One hundred and fifty-eight multiparous cows were used in a randomized block design during 42 experimental days. Cows were distributed into two treatments: the control treatment cows received 100 g/cow/day of corn meal, while the HMTBa-supplemented cows received 35 g of HMTBa + 65 g/cow/day of corn meal. HMTBa supplementation did not alter milk production but improved milk fat content. Cows receiving HMTBa supplementation showed an increase in the concentration of milk medium-chain fatty acids. Serum levels of blood urea and aspartate aminotransferase were lower in HMTBa-supplemented cows. Cows supplemented with HMTBa increased their body condition score. In summary, HMTB supplementation in high-producing Holstein cows improved productive performance, particularly increased milk fat content, altered milk fatty acid profile, and changed some blood metabolites. Our findings contribute to our understanding of using a methionine analogue as a dietary strategy for optimizing milk quality in high-producing Holstein cows. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Dairy Cattle Feeding and Nutrition)
11 pages, 277 KiB  
Article
Cactus Cladodes and Sugarcane Bagasse Can Partially Replace Earless Corn Silage in Diets of Lactating Dairy Cows
Dairy 2024, 5(1), 33-43; https://doi.org/10.3390/dairy5010003 - 23 Dec 2023
Viewed by 471
Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate the effects of replacing earless corn silage (ECS) with cactus cladodes (CC; Opuntia spp.) and sugarcane bagasse (SB) on nutrient intake, digestibility, feeding behavior, milk yield (MY), and composition of lactating dairy cows. Ten Holstein cows, weighing 571 [...] Read more.
This study aimed to evaluate the effects of replacing earless corn silage (ECS) with cactus cladodes (CC; Opuntia spp.) and sugarcane bagasse (SB) on nutrient intake, digestibility, feeding behavior, milk yield (MY), and composition of lactating dairy cows. Ten Holstein cows, weighing 571 ± 97.0 kg and producing 23.0 ± 4.4 kg of milk per day, were assigned to two contemporaneous 5 × 5 Latin squares. Treatments consisted of five levels of ECS replacement with CC plus SB (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100%). The results showed a linear increase in dry matter (DM) intake (p < 0.05) (15.98 and 18.73 kg/day) and a quadratic increase (p < 0.05) in crude protein and energy intake (2.97 kg/day and 27.52 Mcal/day at 95.4 and 88.6% substitution, respectively). Apparent DM digestibility increased (p < 0.05), but fiber digestibility decreased linearly (p < 0.05). Treatments had a quadratic effect (p < 0.05) on MY and fat-corrected MY (24.17 kg/day and 21.9 kg/day at 63.9% and 38.6% CC plus SB, respectively). Milk fat (3.26 and 2.35%) and total solids content decreased linearly (p < 0.05), whereas the percentages of protein, lactose, and nonfat solids increased (p < 0.05). Additionally, the CC–SB diets linearly reduced the time spent on feeding and rumination and total chewing time. For Holstein cows fed common semiarid diets, milk production can be maximized by replacing 38.6% of ECS with CC plus SB. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Dairy Cattle Feeding and Nutrition)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

14 pages, 1159 KiB  
Article
Production Responses of Holstein Dairy Cows to a Sodium Propionate Supplement Fed Postpartum to Prevent Hyperketonemia
Dairy 2023, 4(4), 527-540; https://doi.org/10.3390/dairy4040036 - 29 Sep 2023
Viewed by 654
Abstract
Hyperketonemia is common in cows postpartum and is associated with a decrease in milk production, reproductive efficiency, and increased risk of periparturient diseases and early culling from the herd. The objective of this research was to determine if feeding an exogenous source of [...] Read more.
Hyperketonemia is common in cows postpartum and is associated with a decrease in milk production, reproductive efficiency, and increased risk of periparturient diseases and early culling from the herd. The objective of this research was to determine if feeding an exogenous source of propionate increased milk and milk component yield and reduced the incidence of hyperketonemia and other health events in Holstein dairy cows. Cows were systematically enrolled in the control group (C) or sodium propionate treatment group (SP) in a randomized block design. A subset of cows was sampled for blood glucose and betahydroxybutyrate (BHB) concentrations in milk at 3, 7, and 14 days using a NovaMax® Plus™ meter (Nova Diabetes Care, Inc., Billerica, MA, USA). Data were analyzed using a mixed model. Average blood BHB and glucose concentrations during the postpartum period did not differ between treatments for multiparous or primiparous cows (C = 0.53 ± 0.02, SP: 0.55 ± 0.02 mmol BHB/L, p = 0.5; C = 44.0 ± 0.77, SP = 43.0 ± 0.78 glucose mg/dL, p = 0.6). However, the prevalence of hyperketonemia and metritis was high in primiparous cows (C = 35.6% and 19.8%, respectively; SP = 35.8% and 18.9%, respectively). Blood glucose was inversely related to BHB concentration for cows below 40 mg/dL blood glucose. Feeding sodium propionate during the postpartum period increased milk fat yield (C = 1.71; SP = 1.86 kg/day, p = 0.01), tended to increase milk yield in multiparous cows (C = 39.3; SP = 40.5 kg/day, p = 0.06) and increased milk fat yield in primiparous cows (C = 1.18; SP = 1.27 kg/day, p = 0.02). Including sodium propionate in the total mixed ration is beneficial to reduce health events and increase milk fat production in multiparous cows but may only increase milk fat production in primiparous cows. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Dairy Cattle Feeding and Nutrition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 1124 KiB  
Article
The Impact on Cow Performance and Feed Efficiency When Individual Cow Milk Composition and Energy Intake Are Accounted for When Allocating Concentrates
Dairy 2023, 4(3), 423-434; https://doi.org/10.3390/dairy4030028 - 03 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1138
Abstract
The objective of this three-treatment, 12-week study (involving 69 dairy cows) was to test three methods of concentrate allocation on milk production efficiency. All treatments were offered a basal mixed ration of grass silage and concentrates, with additional concentrates offered to individual cows [...] Read more.
The objective of this three-treatment, 12-week study (involving 69 dairy cows) was to test three methods of concentrate allocation on milk production efficiency. All treatments were offered a basal mixed ration of grass silage and concentrates, with additional concentrates offered to individual cows based on either milk yield alone (Control), milk energy output (Precision 1) or energy intake and milk energy output (Precision 2). Concentrate requirements were calculated and adjusted weekly. Control cows had lower concentrate dry matter intake (DMI; p = 0.040) and milk protein content (p = 0.003) but yield of milk and energy-corrected milk (ECM), energy balance, bodyweight and condition score were unaffected by treatment. Efficiency measures such as ECM/DMI and ECM/metabolizable energy intake were also unaffected by treatment. Less concentrates were used per kg ECM yield in the Control compared to the Precision treatments (p < 0.001). In conclusion, accounting for individual cow milk composition or milk composition combined with individual cow energy intake did not improve production efficiency compared to an approach based on individual cow milk yield only. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Dairy Cattle Feeding and Nutrition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop