Indoor Air Quality: Risk Assessment and Public Health

A special issue of Air (ISSN 2813-4168).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 2466

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Foundation for the Promotion of Health and Biomedical Research in the Valencian Region (FISABIO-Public Health), Av. Catalunya 21, 46020 Valencia, Spain
Interests: pesticides; ambient air; risk assessment; emerging pollutants; analytical methods; biomonitoring
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Foundation for the Promotion of Health and Biomedical Research in the Valencian Region (FISABIO-Public Health), Av. Catalunya 21, 46020 Valencia, Spain
2. Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Valencia, Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot, Spain
Interests: risk assessment; plastics; biomonitoring; environment; emerging pollutants; analytical methods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Indoor Analysis is a need for health and safety reasons and the control of indoor air quality is a challenge due to the low concentration of many contaminants and the difficulties of sampling, sample transport and preservation concerning the physical state of target molecules and their association to suspended particles. In this regard, taking into account that people spend more than 90 % of their time in indoor environments, the control of pollutants in indoor environments is a matter of interest and a research field of growing interest.

This Special Issue aims to feature full-length articles, reviews, and communications addressing novel research on this topic from a multidisciplinary point of view, including (but not limited to):

  • Levels of pollutants in indoor air ambient (mainly air and dust samples).
  • Respiratory viruses in indoor air environments.
  • External exposure assessment of pollutants.
  • Alternative approaches for risk assessment and management.
  • New regulatory guidelines for emerging pollutants.
  • Case-studies, results, and findings in specific geographical regions.

All contributions regarding fundamental and applied research on these topics, including novel research and results conducted by undergraduate or PhD students are welcomed in this Special Issue.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in IJERPH.

Dr. Antonio López
Dr. Pablo Miralles
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Air is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • air quality
  • risk assessment
  • emerging pollutants
  • environmental control
  • public health guidelines

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 5215 KiB  
Article
Experimental Study of the TVOC Distribution in a Car Cabin
by Nadir Hafs, Mokhtar Djeddou, Ahmed Benabed, Georges Fokoua and Amine Mehel
Air 2023, 1(3), 184-195; https://doi.org/10.3390/air1030014 - 9 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1719
Abstract
The vehicle in-cabin is subject to several types of pollutants infiltrating from the outdoors or emitted directly inside it, such as Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). The concentration of TVOC (total volatile organic compounds) is the result of the emission from different equipment surfaces [...] Read more.
The vehicle in-cabin is subject to several types of pollutants infiltrating from the outdoors or emitted directly inside it, such as Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). The concentration of TVOC (total volatile organic compounds) is the result of the emission from different equipment surfaces that compose the car cabin. In the present study, the experimental characterization of TVOC emission from the interior surfaces of a car cabin is discussed by considering the influence of two parameters: the temperature and ventilation modes. A measurement location grid was used to measure TVOC’s emissions from 267 points on all surfaces of the car’s interior equipment. Three different temperatures and two ventilation modes (recirculation and outdoor air) were investigated. The results indicate that the concentration of TVOC increases with the temperature inside the cabin with a contribution that varies with the type of cabin equipment including the dashboard, center console, seats, and carpets. On the other hand, the concentration distributions of TVOC showed relative differences of 10–13% and 2–5% for surface and volumetric measurements, respectively. This implies no preferential positioning of the in-cabin probe for TVOC volumetric concentration measurements. In addition, the recirculation ventilation mode results in a higher accumulation of TVOC; therefore, higher concentrations are measured. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Indoor Air Quality: Risk Assessment and Public Health)
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