High Speed Flows: Measurements & Simulations

A special issue of Aerospace (ISSN 2226-4310). This special issue belongs to the section "Aeronautics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 December 2023) | Viewed by 3762

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, South East Technological University, Carlow Campus, Carlow, Ireland
Interests: hypersonic flow controls; wind tunnel & shock tunnel testing; high-speed simulations; detonation combustion

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Guest Editor
School of Engineering, Toyota Technological Institute, Nagoya, Japan
Interests: aerospace engineering; hypersonic aerothermodynamics; space exploration

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Guest Editor
School of Aerospace Engineering, La Sapienza University of Rome Via Salaria 851, 00138 Rome, Italy
Interests: propulsion; aerospace; combustion
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is inspired by the broad interests in Experimental and Numerical simulation research activities to enable the high-speed flights (supersonic and hypersonic range) by ground testing and translating the outcomes to the flight testing among the aerospace community.

Despite a long history of research and development to enable high-speed flights, which are identified in numerous publications, many fundamental and engineering aspects for translating the ground testing (experiments and numerical simulations) to high-speed flight are still underexplored and related knowledge has not been transferred to the technical implementation yet. The research for high-speed flows (supersonic and hypersonic) are challenging due to limited test time in ground testing facilities, complex nature of flow physics in theoretical and numerical modelling and there is huge gap in further translating the outcomes of ground testing to flight testing. This Special Issue is targeting current fundamental research efforts related to high-speed flights in a broad range of topics for emerging aerospace applications.

Manuscripts are solicited describing experimental, computational, and/or theoretical research related to supersonic/hypersonic flows along with high-speed propulsion with focus on next steps to enable high-speed flights. Publications related to a specific application are relevant to this Special Issue’s scope as well. Submissions may also include ongoing project reports and studies addressing problems in other fields, such as advanced propulsion, energy, or the environment. Topics include but are not limited to:

  • Compressible aerodynamics, aerodynamic design;
  • Shock waves and shock waves–boundary layer interaction;
  • Numerical simulations of Subsonic/Supersonic turbulent reacting flows, Turbulence Modelling;
  • Re-entry, entry to planetary atmosphere;
  • High-speed Active / Passive Flow controls;
  • Ramjet/scramjet Design, Flame stability, combustion efficiency;
  • Ground test facilities, flight experiments;
  • Advanced Measurements and Non-intrusive Diagnostics;
  • Green Propellants;
  • Rarefied Flows;
  • Advanced Propulsion to enable high-speed flights and space access. 

Dr. Ashish Vashishtha
Dr. Yasumasa Watanabe
Prof. Dr. Antonella Ingenito
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Aerospace is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • supersonic/hypersonic flows
  • compression/expansion waves
  • high-speed unsteady flows & its control
  • ground/flight testing for high-speed flows
  • aerothermodynamics
  • atmospheric
  • planetary re-entry
  • design for demise
  • ramjet
  • scramjet
  • combustion
  • detonation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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21 pages, 12618 KiB  
Article
Large-Eddy Simulations of a Hypersonic Re-Entry Capsule Coupled with the Supersonic Disk-Gap-Band Parachute
by Lakshmi Narayana Phaneendra Peri, Antonella Ingenito and Paolo Teofilatto
Aerospace 2024, 11(1), 94; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace11010094 - 19 Jan 2024
Viewed by 873
Abstract
The goal of this paper is to investigate the aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic behavior of the Schiaparelli capsule after the deployment of a supersonic disk-gap-band (DGB) parachute during its re-entry phase into the Martian atmosphere. The novelty of this work lies in the investigation [...] Read more.
The goal of this paper is to investigate the aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic behavior of the Schiaparelli capsule after the deployment of a supersonic disk-gap-band (DGB) parachute during its re-entry phase into the Martian atmosphere. The novelty of this work lies in the investigation by LES (large-eddy simulations) of the coupled interaction of the flow field generated behind the capsule and that in front of the flexible DGB parachute. These simulations are performed at an altitude of 10 km and a Mach number around 2, i.e., a regime in which large canopy-area oscillations are observed. LES results have shown a strong interaction between the bow shock, the recompression and expansion waves, high pressure, density and temperature gradients, heat flux towards the airstream and the body implying turbulence generation, ingestion, and amplification through the shock waves. Vortices released from the capsule at a frequency of about 52 Hz and 159 Hz, corresponding to Strouhal numbers of ~0.2 and 0.75, respectively, are the main factors responsible for the instabilities of the hypersonic re-entry capsule and the disk-gap-band parachute coupled system. The nonlinear turbulence flow field generated at the capsule back is amplified when passing the parachute bow shock, and this is responsible for the non-axisymmetric behavior around and behind the parachute that caused the uncontrolled capsule oscillations and the Schiaparelli mission failure. In fact, an LES of the parachute without the capsule, for the same conditions, show a completely axisymmetric field, varying in time, but axisymmetric. In order to avoid this turbulence amplification, dampening of the vortex shedding is critical. Different techniques have been already proposed for other applications. In the case of capsule re-entry, due to the high temperatures in front of the capsule behind the bow shock since air plasma is generated, damping of the vortex shedding could be achieved by means of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) control. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Speed Flows: Measurements & Simulations)
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24 pages, 22921 KiB  
Article
Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Turbulent Separated Flows Based on k–ω Turbulence Models with Different Compressibility Corrections
by Dahai Luo
Aerospace 2023, 10(12), 1014; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace10121014 - 04 Dec 2023
Viewed by 940
Abstract
The accurate prediction of supersonic turbulent separated flows involved in aerospace vehicles is a great challenge for current numerical simulations. Based on the k–ω equations, several different compressibility corrections are incorporated in turbulence models to improve their prediction capabilities. Two benchmark test cases, [...] Read more.
The accurate prediction of supersonic turbulent separated flows involved in aerospace vehicles is a great challenge for current numerical simulations. Based on the k–ω equations, several different compressibility corrections are incorporated in turbulence models to improve their prediction capabilities. Two benchmark test cases, namely the ramped cavity and the compression corner, are adopted for the numerical validation. Detailed comparisons between simulations and experiments are conducted to evaluate the effect of compressibility corrections on turbulence models. The computed results indicate that compressibility corrections have a significant impact on turbulence model performance. The compressibility correction, considering the effects of both dilatation dissipation and pressure dilatation, is suitable for the prediction of compressible free shear layers, but it may have a negative impact on the prediction of low-speed flows in the near-wall region due to the severe underprediction of the wall skin friction coefficient. In comparison, the compressibility correction only considering the effects of dilatation dissipation is conservative, with decreased predictability of free shear layers in supersonic flows, although it improves the predictions of the original models without corrections. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Speed Flows: Measurements & Simulations)
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Review

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34 pages, 6363 KiB  
Review
Computational and Experimental Modeling in Magnetoplasma Aerodynamics and High-Speed Gas and Plasma Flows (A Review)
by Victor V. Kuzenov, Sergei V. Ryzhkov and Aleksey Yu. Varaksin
Aerospace 2023, 10(8), 662; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace10080662 - 25 Jul 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1405
Abstract
This paper provides an overview of modern research on magnetoplasma methods of influencing gas-dynamic and plasma flows. The main physical mechanisms that control the interaction of plasma discharges with gaseous moving media are indicated. The ways of organizing pulsed energy input, characteristic of [...] Read more.
This paper provides an overview of modern research on magnetoplasma methods of influencing gas-dynamic and plasma flows. The main physical mechanisms that control the interaction of plasma discharges with gaseous moving media are indicated. The ways of organizing pulsed energy input, characteristic of plasma aerodynamics, are briefly described: linearly stabilized discharge, magnetoplasma compressor, capillary discharge, laser-microwave action, electron beam action, nanosecond surface barrier discharges, pulsed spark discharges, and nanosecond optical discharges. A description of the physical mechanism of heating the gas-plasma flow at high values of electric fields, which are realized in high-current and nanosecond (ultrafast heating) electric discharges, is performed. Methods for magnetoplasma control of the configuration and gas-dynamic characteristics of shock waves arising in front of promising and advanced aircraft (AA) are described. Approaches to the control of quasi-stationary separated flows, laminar–turbulent transitions, and static and dynamic separation of the boundary layer (for large PA angles of attack) are presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Speed Flows: Measurements & Simulations)
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