Topic Editors

1. Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Physiology and Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Crop Cultivation and Physiology, Agricultural College of Yangzhou, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009, China
2. Co-Innovation Center for Modern Production Technology of Grain Crops, Agricultural College of Yangzhou University, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009, China
Prof. Dr. Jinfeng Ding
College of Agriculture, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009, China
College of Agriculture, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009, China

Abiotic Stress Responses in Wheat: Perspectives on Productivity and Sustainability

Abstract submission deadline
31 August 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
31 October 2024
Viewed by
3300

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Abiotic stresses (drought, salinity, cold, heat, waterlogging, etc.) are the major factors negatively influencing crop development and productivity. They are the main causes of extensive agricultural production losses worldwide. Regarding abiotic stresses, drought, salinity, and extreme temperatures are the major environmental constraints that modern agriculture must cope with. It has been estimated that they may be responsible for a 50% or greater yield reduction in major crop plants. Wheat, as a major staple food, represents an important source of essential elements such as energy, proteins, vitamins, and minerals, among other beneficial compounds. Elucidating the tolerance mechanisms of abiotic stresses in wheat is critical in relieving the effects of these stresses on wheat production.

This Topic will be a collection of the latest research on the agronomical, physiological, and molecular aspects of abiotic stress tolerance in wheat, aiming to provide a comprehensive understanding of the associated mechanisms in wheat grown under unfavorable conditions and significantly improve the efficiency of wheat production. Original research articles, reviews, and short communications are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Wenshan Guo
Prof. Dr. Jinfeng Ding
Dr. Min Zhu
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • abiotic stress
  • wheat
  • yield
  • quality
  • physiological mechanisms

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Agronomy
agronomy
3.7 5.2 2011 15.8 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Crops
crops
- - 2021 30.5 Days CHF 1000 Submit
Plants
plants
4.5 5.4 2012 15.3 Days CHF 2700 Submit

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Published Papers (4 papers)

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20 pages, 2685 KiB  
Article
Phenotyping Seedling Root Biometry of Two Contrasting Bread Wheat Cultivars under Nutrient Deficiency and Drought Stress
by Roberta Rossi, Rocco Bochicchio, Rosanna Labella, Mariana Amato and Pasquale De Vita
Agronomy 2024, 14(4), 775; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy14040775 - 09 Apr 2024
Viewed by 333
Abstract
Roots play a key role in withstanding wheat abiotic stress. In this work, we phenotyped seedling root morphology of two semi-dwarf bread wheat cultivars, the Chinese cv Lankaodali and the Italian cv Rebelde, under the hypothesis that these two genotypes have contrasting root [...] Read more.
Roots play a key role in withstanding wheat abiotic stress. In this work, we phenotyped seedling root morphology of two semi-dwarf bread wheat cultivars, the Chinese cv Lankaodali and the Italian cv Rebelde, under the hypothesis that these two genotypes have contrasting root traits and could be used as donors in breeding programs. Root development was compared in a semi-hydroponic screening, where full-strength (FS) vs. half-strength (HS) complete Hoagland’s solution represented high and moderate nutrient availability, and a screening comparing HS solution with tap water corresponding to a condition of nutrient starvation. Genotypes were further compared in soil under full watering (100% of field capacity) vs. drought stress (50% of field capacity). Lankaodali outperformed Rebelde by producing 50% more leaf mass and 70% more root mass in FS solution, 125% more leaf mass and 106% more root mass in HS solution, and 65% more leaf mass and 36% more root mass under nutrient starvation. This cv also showed a positive correlation between leaf mass and root length and mass (between r = 0.82–0.9 and r = 0.83–0.87, respectively, p < 0.05). In the soil screening experiment, Lankaodali produced more biomass than Rebelde regardless of water availability, 48% more leaf mass, 32% more root mass, and 31% more absolute rhizosheath mass (average across water availability treatments). Lankaodali proved to be more responsive than Rebelde to both water and nutrient availability. High values of broad-sense heritability—ranging between 0.80 for root mass and 0.90 for length in a hydroponic screen and 0.85 for rhizosheath size in soil—indicate that these traits could be useful for breeding. Full article
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28 pages, 5334 KiB  
Article
New Prospects for Improving Microspore Embryogenesis Induction in Highly Recalcitrant Winter Wheat Lines
by Ewa Dubas, Monika Krzewska, Ewa Surówka, Przemysław Kopeć, Agnieszka Springer, Franciszek Janowiak, Dorota Weigt, Sylwia Katarzyna Mikołajczyk, Anna Telk and Iwona Żur
Plants 2024, 13(3), 363; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13030363 - 25 Jan 2024
Viewed by 767
Abstract
Among various methods stimulating biological progress, double haploid (DH) technology, which utilizes the process of microspore embryogenesis (ME), is potentially the most effective. However, the process depends on complex interactions between many genetic, physiological and environmental variables, and in many cases, e.g., winter [...] Read more.
Among various methods stimulating biological progress, double haploid (DH) technology, which utilizes the process of microspore embryogenesis (ME), is potentially the most effective. However, the process depends on complex interactions between many genetic, physiological and environmental variables, and in many cases, e.g., winter wheat, does not operate with the efficiency required for commercial use. Stress associated with low-temperature treatment, isolation and transfer to in vitro culture has been shown to disturb redox homeostasis and generate relatively high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), affecting microspore vitality. The aim of this study was to investigate whether controlled plant growth, specific tiller pre-treatment and culture conditions could improve the potential of microspores to cope with stress and effectively induce ME. To understand the mechanism of the stress response, hydrogen peroxide levels, total activity and the content of the most important low-molecular-weight antioxidants (glutathione and ascorbate), as well as the content of selected macro- (Mg, Ca, NA, K) and micronutrients (Mn, Zn, Fe, Cu, Mo) were determined. These analyses, combined with the cytological characteristics of the microspore suspensions, allowed us to demonstrate that an increased microspore vitality and stronger response to ME induction were associated with higher stress resistance based on more efficient ROS scavenging and nutrient management. It was shown that a modified procedure, combining a low temperature with mannitol and sodium selenate tiller pre-treatment, reduced oxidative stress and improved the effectiveness of ME in winter wheat lines. Full article
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20 pages, 2026 KiB  
Article
Phenotypic Variation and Relationships between Grain Yield, Protein Content and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle-Derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index in Spring Wheat in Nordic–Baltic Environments
by Zaiga Jansone, Zigmārs Rendenieks, Andris Lapāns, Ilmar Tamm, Anne Ingver, Andrii Gorash, Andrius Aleliūnas, Gintaras Brazauskas, Sahameh Shafiee, Tomasz Mróz, Morten Lillemo, Hannes Kollist and Māra Bleidere
Agronomy 2024, 14(1), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy14010051 - 23 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1162
Abstract
Accurate and robust methods are needed to monitor crop growth and predict grain yield and quality in breeding programs, particularly under variable agrometeorological conditions. Field experiments were conducted during two successive cropping seasons (2021, 2022) at four trial locations (Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway). [...] Read more.
Accurate and robust methods are needed to monitor crop growth and predict grain yield and quality in breeding programs, particularly under variable agrometeorological conditions. Field experiments were conducted during two successive cropping seasons (2021, 2022) at four trial locations (Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway). The focus was on assessment of the grain yield (GY), grain protein content (GPC), and UAV-derived NDVI measured at different plant growth stages. The performance and stability of 16 selected spring wheat genotypes were assessed under two N application rates (75, 150 kg N ha−1) and across different agrometeorological conditions. Quantitative relationships between agronomic traits and UAV-derived variables were determined. None of the traits exhibited a significant (p < 0.05) genotype-by-nitrogen interaction. High-yielding and high-protein genotypes were detected with a high WAASB stability, specifically under high and low N rates. This study highlights the significant effect of an NDVI analysis at GS55 and GS75 as key linear predictors, especially concerning spring wheat GYs. However, the effectiveness of these indices depends on the specific growing conditions in different, geospatially distant locations, limiting their universal utility. Full article
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13 pages, 2578 KiB  
Article
Enhancing Resistance to Salinity in Wheat by Using Streptomyces sp. HU2014
by Hongxia Zhu, Linfeng Hu, Tetiana Rozhkova and Chengwei Li
Agronomy 2024, 14(1), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy14010039 - 22 Dec 2023
Viewed by 638
Abstract
Salt stress affects the growth and global production of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Plant growth-promoting microbes can enhance plant resistance to abiotic stresses. In this study, we aimed to assess the inoculation of soil with Streptomyces sp. HU2014 to improve wheat tolerance [...] Read more.
Salt stress affects the growth and global production of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Plant growth-promoting microbes can enhance plant resistance to abiotic stresses. In this study, we aimed to assess the inoculation of soil with Streptomyces sp. HU2014 to improve wheat tolerance to salt stress from multiple perspectives, including the interaction of the strain, the addition of NaCl, the condition of the wheat, and rhizosphere microbial communities. The results showed that the strain promoted wheat growth under NaCl stress by increasing biomass by 19.8%, total chlorophyll content by 72.1%, proline content by 152.0%, and malondialdehyde content by 106.9%, and by decreasing catalase by 39.0%, peroxidase by 1.4%, and soluble sugar by 61.6% when compared to the control. With HU2014 soil inoculation, total nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, total phosphorus, and Olsen phosphorus increased, whereas ammonium nitrogen and pH decreased. HU2014 inoculation and/or the addition of NaCl affected the diversity of rhizosphere bacteria, but not fungi. The structure of the microbial community differed after HU2014 inoculation, with Proteobacteria, Acidobacteriota, Bacteroidota, and unclassified fungi being the dominant phyla, and these taxa correlated with the above-mentioned soil parameters. Thus, this study provided a promising way to enhance wheat tolerance to salt stress and improve the agricultural ecological environment by using plant growth-promoting microbes. Full article
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