Topic Editors

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0165, USA
Department of Health Sciences, University “Magna Graecia” of Catanzaro, 88100 Catanzaro, Italy

Bone as an Endocrine Organ

Abstract submission deadline
31 August 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
31 October 2024
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Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Increasing evidence shows that bone is very much an interactive organ in the body and plays an integral role in the functioning or malfunctioning of other organs and tissues. Often, it does this by releasing substances that affect metabolism in ways we could not previously imagine. Some examples of this include the roles of osteocalcin in glucose metabolism and skeletal muscle function and Transforming Growth Factor-Beta in muscle protein degradation. Yet, many questions are unanswered. For example, bone contains and releases substances that are anabolic and catabolic to other tissues. What signals bone to release them and in what quantities? What are the metabolic fates of released calcium, phosphate and magnesium in health and disease? How do these releases affect other organs in different disease states?

Prof. Dr. Gordon L. Klein
Prof. Dr. Antonio Brunetti
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • bone
  • osteocalcin
  • transforming growth factor -beta
  • oxidative stress
  • interleukin-6
  • skeletal muscle
  • heart
  • angiotensin II
  • smad signaling

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Cells
cells
6.0 9.0 2012 16.6 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Endocrines
endocrines
- - 2020 27.2 Days CHF 1000 Submit
International Journal of Molecular Sciences
ijms
5.6 7.8 2000 16.3 Days CHF 2900 Submit
Journal of Clinical Medicine
jcm
3.9 5.4 2012 17.9 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Metabolites
metabolites
4.1 5.3 2011 13.2 Days CHF 2700 Submit

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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Communication
Vibration Rather than Microgravity Affects Bone Metabolism in Adult Zebrafish Scale Model
by Marta Carnovali, Stefania Zava, Giuseppe Banfi, Angela Maria Rizzo and Massimo Mariotti
Cells 2024, 13(6), 509; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells13060509 - 14 Mar 2024
Viewed by 514
Abstract
Gravity and mechanical forces cause important alterations in the human skeletal system, as demonstrated by space flights. Innovative animal models like zebrafish embryos and medaka have been introduced to study bone response in ground-based microgravity simulators. We used, for the first time, adult [...] Read more.
Gravity and mechanical forces cause important alterations in the human skeletal system, as demonstrated by space flights. Innovative animal models like zebrafish embryos and medaka have been introduced to study bone response in ground-based microgravity simulators. We used, for the first time, adult zebrafish in simulated microgravity, with a random positioning machine (RPM) to study bone remodeling in the scales. To evaluate the effects of microgravity on bone remodeling in adult bone tissue, we exposed adult zebrafish to microgravity for 14 days using RPM and we evaluated bone remodeling on explanted scales. Our data highlight bone resorption in scales in simulated microgravity fish but also in the fish exposed, in normal gravity, to the vibrations produced by the RPM. The osteoclast activation in both rotating and non-rotating samples suggest that prolonged vibrations exposure leads to bone resorption in the scales tissue. Stress levels in these fish were normal, as demonstrated by blood cortisol quantification. In conclusion, vibrational mechanical stress induced bone resorption in adult fish scales. Moreover, adult fish as an animal model for microgravity studies remains controversial since fish usually live in weightless conditions because of the buoyant force from water and do not constantly need to support their bodies against gravity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Bone as an Endocrine Organ)
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