Topic Editors

Dr. Yueliang Liu
Petroleum Engineering, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249, China
Dr. Shaoqi Kong
College of Mining Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, China
Faculty of Environment, Science and Economy, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QF, UK

Energy Extraction and Processing Science

Abstract submission deadline
31 October 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
31 December 2024
Viewed by
4159

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Geological resources are one of the most abundant resources on earth, including coal, oil, and natural gas; geothermal energy; oil shale; coal bed methane; etc. These energy sources contain many non-renewable resources, and the safe extraction and rational and sustainable use of these resources are important academic topics. This project aims to publish research results of the highest quality and of lasting importance about energy, focusing on scientific issues arising in the safe production, storage, and application of geological energy sources, such as the construction of macromolecular models of different types of energy sources, the prevention and control of contaminants in the extraction process, the purification and separation of energy sources, the adsorption of auxiliary drugs on the surface of energy sources, and the rational design of energy extraction processes. The concept and sustainable development of safe extraction technologies for new energy sources, which include internal mechanisms to protect the environment from potential project damage and ensure the sustainable use of energy, will be particularly focused on. The main topics of this topic include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • The monitoring and control of dust in energy extraction processes.
  • Macromolecular modeling of different types of energy sources.
  • CO2 sequestration/hydrogen storage in geological formations.
  • Environmental protection in resource development.
  • The application of computer science to solve safety problems in energy extraction.
  • the characterization of size, shape, surface area, pore structure, and strength of energy particles and agglomerates (including the sources and effects of interparticle forces).
  • The adsorption of auxiliary agents at energy interfaces or surfaces.
  • The adsorption process generates competitive behavior.
  • Mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of coupled processes.
  • The creation, storage, and transport of unconventional energy sources.
  • The prevention of and reduction in geological hazards in mines.
  • The mathematical aspects of rock mechanics and rock engineering.
  • The production and storage of geological energy.

Dr. Yueliang Liu
Dr. Shaoqi Kong
Dr. Chuang Wen
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • geoenergy
  • carbon capture and storage
  • subsurface energy storage
  • environmental protection
  • sustainable technologies
  • deep learning
  • carbon mission, modeling and simulation

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Energies
energies
3.2 5.5 2008 16.1 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Environments
environments
3.7 5.9 2014 23.7 Days CHF 1800 Submit
Molecules
molecules
4.6 6.7 1996 14.6 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Polymers
polymers
5.0 6.6 2009 13.7 Days CHF 2700 Submit

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Published Papers (5 papers)

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14 pages, 5256 KiB  
Article
Assessment of Combustion Cavern Geometry in Underground Coal Gasification Process with the Use of Borehole Ground-Penetrating Radar
Energies 2023, 16(18), 6734; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16186734 - 21 Sep 2023
Viewed by 553
Abstract
In this study, the shape and size of a combustion cavity with a fracture zone in the gasified coal seam was determined with the use of control boreholes and a ground-penetrating radar (BGPR) test. The underground coal gasification (UCG) field-scale experiment was performed [...] Read more.
In this study, the shape and size of a combustion cavity with a fracture zone in the gasified coal seam was determined with the use of control boreholes and a ground-penetrating radar (BGPR) test. The underground coal gasification (UCG) field-scale experiment was performed in Carboniferous strata in coal seam 501 at a depth of approx. 460 m in the Wieczorek hard coal mine in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin, Poland. After the termination of the UCG reactor, five coring boreholes were drilled to identify the geometry of the resulting combustion cavity and the impact of the UCG process on the surrounding rock mass. Borehole ground-penetrating radar measurements were performed using a 100 MHz antenna in three boreholes with a length of about 40–50 m. This enabled the identification of the boundaries of the combustion cavity and the fracture zone in the coal seam. The fracture zones of rock layers and lithological borders near the control borehole were also depicted. As a result, the cavity was estimated to have a length of around 32 m, a width of around 7 m and a height of around 5 m. The analyses performed with the control boreholes and the BGPR provided sufficient information to determine the geometry of the combustion cavity and the fracture zone. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Energy Extraction and Processing Science)
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5 pages, 193 KiB  
Editorial
Energy Extraction and Processing Science
Energies 2023, 16(14), 5372; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16145372 - 14 Jul 2023
Viewed by 806
Abstract
With an increasingly tight supply of world energy resources, unconventional oil and gas resources, including shale oil and gas, coal-bed gas, tight sandstone oil and gas, have attracted much attention [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Energy Extraction and Processing Science)
14 pages, 5324 KiB  
Article
Research on the Mechanism of Low-Temperature Oxidation of Asphaltene
Molecules 2023, 28(14), 5362; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules28145362 - 12 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 641
Abstract
Asphaltene extracted from heavy oil was oxidized by a mixture of propionic anhydride and hydrogen peroxide at a low temperature of 50 °C. Elemental analysis, infrared analysis, proton nuclear magnetic resonance analysis, and gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer analysis results indicated that oxygen addition, side [...] Read more.
Asphaltene extracted from heavy oil was oxidized by a mixture of propionic anhydride and hydrogen peroxide at a low temperature of 50 °C. Elemental analysis, infrared analysis, proton nuclear magnetic resonance analysis, and gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer analysis results indicated that oxygen addition, side chain cleavage, and condensation reactions mainly occurred in the oxidation process. The oxidation products were divided into 28% methanol solubles and 72% methanol insolubles. There were mainly fatty acids and fatty acid esters in the methanol solubles. There were also small amounts of aromatic compounds with low condensation in the methanol solubles, and the alkyl side chains were mostly short ones. The degree of aromatic ring condensation in the methanol insolubles was slightly higher than that of the pristine asphaltene. There were still some long unbroken chains in the methanol insolubles after the low-temperature reaction. The molecular dynamics simulation results show that the distribution of propionic anhydride around the asphaltene molecules can promote the oxidation of asphaltene. This low-temperature oxidation technology can be used to process asphaltenes to improve the profitability of heavy-oil-processing enterprises. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Energy Extraction and Processing Science)
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17 pages, 7003 KiB  
Article
The Molecular Model of Organic Matter in Coal-Measure Shale: Structure Construction and Evaluation Based on Experimental Characterization
Molecules 2023, 28(13), 5203; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules28135203 - 04 Jul 2023
Viewed by 816
Abstract
To investigate the molecular structure and micropore structure of organic matters in coal-measure shale, the black shale samples of the Shanxi formation were collected from Xishan Coalfield, Taiyuan, and a hybrid experimental–simulation method was used for realistic macromolecular models of organic matter (OM). [...] Read more.
To investigate the molecular structure and micropore structure of organic matters in coal-measure shale, the black shale samples of the Shanxi formation were collected from Xishan Coalfield, Taiyuan, and a hybrid experimental–simulation method was used for realistic macromolecular models of organic matter (OM). Four experimental techniques were used to determine the structural information of OM, including elemental analysis, state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (13CNMR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). With structural parameters, two-dimensional (2D) average molecular models of OM were established as C177H160O8N2S with a molar weight of 2474, which agreed well with the experimental 13C-NMR spectra. A realistic three-dimensional (3D) OM macromolecular model was also reconstructed, containing 20 2D molecules with a density of 1.41 g/cm3. To determine the connectivity and spatial disposition of the OM pores, focused ion beam microscope (FIB-SEM) and transmission electron micrographs (TEM) were utilized. The 3D OM pores models were developed. The results show that whether the OM pores varied from 20 to 350 nm as obtained from FIB-SEM images or less than 10 nm as observed in the TEM images, both were of poor connectivity. However, the ultra-micro pores from the 3D OM macromolecular model varied from 3Å to 10 Å and showed certain connectivity, which may be the main channel of diffusion. Furthermore, with the pressure increased, the methane adsorption capacity of the 3D OM model increased with a maximum value of 103 cm3/g at 7 MPa, indicating that OM pores less than 1 nm have a huge methane adsorption capacity. Therefore, our work provides an analysis method that is a powerful and superior tool in further research on gas migration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Energy Extraction and Processing Science)
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21 pages, 11485 KiB  
Article
Molecular Mechanism Study on the Effect of Microstructural Differences of Octylphenol Polyoxyethylene Ether (OPEO) Surfactants on the Wettability of Anthracite
Molecules 2023, 28(12), 4748; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules28124748 - 13 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 807
Abstract
Inhalable coal dust poses a serious threat to coal mining safety, air quality, and the health of miners. Therefore, the development of efficient dust suppressants is crucial for addressing this issue. This study evaluated the ability of three high-surface-active OPEO-type nonionic surfactants (OP4, [...] Read more.
Inhalable coal dust poses a serious threat to coal mining safety, air quality, and the health of miners. Therefore, the development of efficient dust suppressants is crucial for addressing this issue. This study evaluated the ability of three high-surface-active OPEO-type nonionic surfactants (OP4, OP9, and OP13) to improve the wetting properties of anthracite via extensive experiments and a molecular simulation and determined the micro-mechanism of different wetting properties. The surface tension results show that OP4 has the lowest surface tension (27.182 mN/m). Contact angle tests and wetting kinetics models suggest that OP4 exhibits the strongest wetting improvement ability on raw coal with the smallest contact angle (20.1°) and the fastest wetting rate. In addition, FTIR and XPS experimental results also reveal that OP4-treated coal surfaces introduce the most hydrophilic elements and groups. UV spectroscopy testing shows that OP4 has the highest adsorption capacity on the coal surface, reaching 133.45 mg/g. The surfactant is adsorbed on the surface and pores of anthracite, while the strong adsorption ability of OP4 results in the least amount of N2 adsorption (8.408 cm3/g) but the largest specific surface area (1.673 m2/g). In addition, the filling behavior and aggregation behavior of surfactants on the anthracite coal surface were observed using SEM. The MD simulation results indicate that OPEO reagents with overly long hydrophilic chains would produce spatial effects on the coal surface. Under the influence of the π-π interaction between the hydrophobic benzene ring and the coal surface, OPEO reagents with fewer ethylene oxide quantities are more prone to adsorb onto the coal surface. Therefore, after the adsorption of OP4, both the polarity and the water molecule adhesion ability of the coal surface are greatly enhanced, which helps to suppress dust production. These results provide important references and a foundation for future designs of efficient compound dust suppressant systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Energy Extraction and Processing Science)
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