Topic Editors

School of Public Health, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China
Institute of Landscape Architecture, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China
Department of Urban Planning and Design, Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, Suzhou 215028, China
Department of the Environment, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA

Healthy and Sustainable Living Environments: Green and Blue Spaces

Abstract submission deadline
closed (30 December 2023)
Manuscript submission deadline
closed (1 March 2024)
Viewed by
7035

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

A number of cities are becoming increasingly congested and polluted worldwide. Urban densification often leads to the removal or degradation of existing green and blue space in ways that are difficult to reverse. The growing understanding of the importance of healthy and sustainable living environments, and in particular of green and blue spaces, for human well-being has prompted numerous studies providing evidence on the links with a wide range of environmental, social, and health benefits. Before green–blue space can be fully integrated into the policy on urban planning and urban design, land management, and health promotion policies, the existing research questions and limitations should be addressed. We invite authors to contribute original research articles and review articles focused on a broad overview of the new methods and techniques to characterize the exposure of green and blue spaces, multiple benefits of green and blue spaces on people’s physical health and social well-beings, the roles of blue–green infrastructure in sustainable urban development, and the innovative conservation, planning, design and management strategies to optimizing the certain well-beings of green and blue spaces, covering the topic from a multidisciplinary field. To draw inspiration from a wide variety of disciplines, this Topic broadly defines green and blue spaces and well-being. Green spaces cover forests, parks, natural reserves, grasses, gardens, street greenery, etc. Blue spaces cover rivers, lakes, reservoirs, the sea, etc. Human well-being includes a healthier lifestyle (e.g., enhanced physical activity), better physical and mental health, reduced stress, more social interaction, etc.

This collection includes but is not limited to the following topics:

  • New methods or data to monitor green and blue spaces;
  • Role of RS and GIS in assessment of green and blue spaces;
  • Equity in green and blue spaces’ proximity, quantity, and quality;
  • Ecosystem service value of green and blue spaces;
  • Cooling effects of green and blue spaces;
  • Human behaviors associated with green and blue spaces;
  • Health effects of green and blue spaces;
  • Sustainable urban planning and urban design;
  • Land policy on green and blue spaces.

We would like to extend a special thank you to Dr. Xin (Summer) Xu for her great support in sharing the beautiful image that serves as the Topic's Graphic Abstract.

Dr. Kejia Hu
Dr. Jiayu Wu
Dr. Jinglu Song
Dr. Yimeng Song
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • green space
  • blue space
  • green and blue infrastructure
  • sustainable urban design
  • urban ecosystem
  • urban landscape
  • urban heat mitigation
  • physical activity
  • human health
  • land policy

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Environments
environments
3.7 5.9 2014 23.7 Days CHF 1800
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
ijerph
- 5.4 2004 29.6 Days CHF 2500
Land
land
3.9 3.7 2012 14.8 Days CHF 2600
Remote Sensing
remotesensing
5.0 7.9 2009 23 Days CHF 2700
Buildings
buildings
3.8 3.1 2011 14.6 Days CHF 2600

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Published Papers (4 papers)

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32 pages, 2087 KiB  
Systematic Review
Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Green Infrastructure: A Systematic Exploration of Definitions and Their Origins
Environments 2024, 11(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments11010008 - 02 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1390
Abstract
Green Infrastructure (GI) is rooted in ecology and cuts across multiple disciplines, including landscape architecture, environmental sciences, planning, policy, and engineering. Likewise, the definition of this concept also cuts across disciplines, which creates ambiguity around what GI is and what makes up GI [...] Read more.
Green Infrastructure (GI) is rooted in ecology and cuts across multiple disciplines, including landscape architecture, environmental sciences, planning, policy, and engineering. Likewise, the definition of this concept also cuts across disciplines, which creates ambiguity around what GI is and what makes up GI in practice—for example, mistaking bioswales for regular tree planters or green space within communities in which they are installed. We undertook a systematic literature review of 38 peer-reviewed articles for this study using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) method to identify and synthesize the different disciplinary definitions of GI in the literature. This study also presents the types of GI systems mentioned in the peer-reviewed articles while identifying other benefits apart from the primary benefit of GI installation, which is stormwater management. The analysis revealed three clusters of GI definitions: (I) Interconnected natural areas and other open spaces, (II) Strategically planned natural and semi-natural areas, and (III) Decentralized systems and techniques. However, we got rid of the third cluster during the analysis because GI is known to be a decentralized system, and the definition region could not be tracked. These clusters represent a spectrum, one of which employs the structure of natural systems already in place to support human goals (bio-inclusivity). The other includes living systems as components within engineered solutions to achieve objectives (bio-integration). This review points to the need for an encompassing definition that cuts across disciplines with a consensus on the adoption and concise categorization of GI types and the multiple benefits they provide to humans and ecosystems. A consensus definition helps clear misconceptions and improve the understanding of GI, potentially improving receptivity towards these solutions within communities from a community member perspective. Full article
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21 pages, 10778 KiB  
Article
The Role of “Nostalgia” in Environmental Restorative Effects from the Perspective of Healthy Aging: Taking Changchun Parks as an Example
Land 2023, 12(9), 1817; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12091817 - 21 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1031
Abstract
Aging and elderly health issues have always been the focus of attention, both within and outside the industry. With the introduction of the national “14th Five-Year Plan” for healthy aging, it is urgent to address how to implement this plan. Among them, the [...] Read more.
Aging and elderly health issues have always been the focus of attention, both within and outside the industry. With the introduction of the national “14th Five-Year Plan” for healthy aging, it is urgent to address how to implement this plan. Among them, the restorative environment is an important part of implementing healthy aging. For older adults, “nostalgia” is a common emotional experience, and “nostalgia therapy” is also commonly used for mental health recovery, which has important significance for healthy aging. However, although existing research on “nostalgia” has already involved local attachment and the environment, there are few studies that use space as a carrier in the context of environmental restorative effects. Therefore, from the perspective of healthy aging, combined with structural equation modeling, this study took four parks in Changchun City as examples to explore the role of “nostalgia” in the restorative effect of the park environment. It found that, firstly, both the “nostalgia inclination” influenced by individual conditions and the “landscape perception” influenced by landscape quality had a positive impact on the “nostalgia affection”; secondly, nostalgia affection and place attachment were important mediating factors for environmental restorative effects, and the pathways of “landscape perception → nostalgic affection → environmental restorative effects”, “landscape perception → place attachment → environmental restorative effects”, and “landscape perception → nostalgic affection → place attachment → environmental restorative effects” all existed. Based on the above path exploration, corresponding spatial optimization ideas for effectively improving the health level of older adults have been provided. Full article
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26 pages, 15803 KiB  
Article
Research on Social Service Effectiveness Evaluation for Urban Blue Spaces—A Case Study of the Huangpu River Core Section in Shanghai
Land 2023, 12(7), 1424; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12071424 - 16 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1294
Abstract
Urban blue spaces (UBSs) hold significant value in terms of public health, tourism economy, and residents’ well-being. The Huangpu River in Shanghai, renowned as a global urban blue space, currently faces challenges such as unequal service capacity across sections and varying levels of [...] Read more.
Urban blue spaces (UBSs) hold significant value in terms of public health, tourism economy, and residents’ well-being. The Huangpu River in Shanghai, renowned as a global urban blue space, currently faces challenges such as unequal service capacity across sections and varying levels of spatial vitality. This study incorporates the concept of “service effectiveness” into public space evaluation. Drawing inspiration from the 4E (economics, efficiency, equity, and effectiveness) principles of effectiveness evaluation, a social service effectiveness evaluation system is constructed to measure service efficiency and effect. Through the literature research, 6 primary indicators and 12 secondary indicators are set to investigate the utilization rate and realization effect of the UBS. The evaluation system utilizes field surveys, text analysis, and remote-sensing techniques to collect relevant data. Through standardized calculations, different aspects of the indicators are integrated into a single evaluation criterion. The “overall effectiveness index” and the “efficiency–effect balance index” is introduced to quantitatively analyze the overall effectiveness characteristics, including spatial characteristics and time-varying characteristics, as well as efficiency–effect balance and imbalances. The evaluation located three low-effectiveness sections and three imbalanced sections at the north and south ends of the core section of the Huangpu River. The influence factors of effectiveness are analyzed through correlation test and literature studies, mainly including the urban hinterland, service facilities, environmental quality, and management publicity factors. This study aims to provide research ideas and methods for waterfront area planning and city-refined management. Full article
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27 pages, 4716 KiB  
Article
The Impact of the Type and Abundance of Urban Blue Space on House Prices: A Case Study of Eight Megacities in China
Land 2023, 12(4), 865; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12040865 - 11 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1164
Abstract
Urban blue spaces (UBS) have been shown to provide a multitude of cultural ecosystem services to urban residents, while also having a considerable impact on the surrounding community’s house prices. However, the impact of different types of UBS and the effect of their [...] Read more.
Urban blue spaces (UBS) have been shown to provide a multitude of cultural ecosystem services to urban residents, while also having a considerable impact on the surrounding community’s house prices. However, the impact of different types of UBS and the effect of their abundance on house prices have been largely understudied. This study aims to address this gap by examining the impact of different types of UBS on house prices using eight megacities in China as a case study. Spatial hedonic price models are developed to assess the impact of different types of UBS on house prices, and differences in their impact across cities are identified. Variance partitioning analysis is also used to decompose the relative contributions of UBS variables and explore the relationship between UBS-attributable premiums and the abundance of UBS. The results indicate that lakes and the main river have a significant positive impact on house prices in most cities, while the impact of small rivers on house prices varies across cities. The influence of UBS variables differs significantly across cities, but these differences are not solely driven by the abundance of UBS. This study provides valuable information for UBS planning and management and contributes to the equitable distribution of urban public services. Full article
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