Topic Editors

Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences, Università dell'Aquila, 67100 L'Aquila, AQ, Italy
Dr. Gianni Gallusi
Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences, Università dell'Aquila, 67100 L'Aquila, AQ, Italy

Advances in Dental Health

Abstract submission deadline
9 August 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
9 November 2024
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Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is pleasure to invite you to submit manuscripts to one of the most topics in dentistry: Advances in Dental Health. The advances in dental Health is by the advent of digital technology and artificial intelligent. The dentistry in recent years had a big change because of this. This Topic is aimed at dealing with topics relating to diagnosis and treatment and new technologies.

We look forward to receiving your submissions

Dr. Sabina Saccomanno
Dr. Gianni Gallusi
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • orthodontic
  • pediatric care
  • artificial intelligence
  • digital dentistry
  • oral disease
  • sleep disorders
  • dysfunction temporomandibular
  • aligners
  • periodontology
  • dental materials
  • oral surgery
  • posture

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Dentistry Journal
dentistry
2.6 4.0 2013 27.8 Days CHF 2000 Submit
Healthcare
healthcare
2.8 2.7 2013 19.5 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Journal of Clinical Medicine
jcm
3.9 5.4 2012 17.9 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Journal of Personalized Medicine
jpm
3.4 2.6 2011 17.8 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Oral
oral
- - 2021 27.7 Days CHF 1000 Submit

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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15 pages, 3431 KiB  
Article
Effectiveness of Rehabilitation for Disk Displacement of the Temporomandibular Joint—A Cross-Sectional Study
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(3), 902; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13030902 - 04 Feb 2024
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Abstract
(1) Background: Dislocations of articular disk can occur as a result of parafunctions in the Temporo Mandibular Joint (TMJ), which limits the opening of the mandible and other movements. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of rehabilitation in [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Dislocations of articular disk can occur as a result of parafunctions in the Temporo Mandibular Joint (TMJ), which limits the opening of the mandible and other movements. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of rehabilitation in patients with disk displacement of the TMJ. A total of 327 subjects with Temporo Mandibular Disorders underwent stomathognatic physiotherapy. (2) Methods: Based on the results obtained by a manual functional analysis, 35 patients who were identified with articular disk locking (disk displacement without reduction) were included in the study. The study group (N = 35) was subjected to passive repositioning of the articular disk, reposition splints, and physiotherapy. The patient’s TMJs were then examined before the therapy, immediately after the therapy, and during the follow-up visit 3–6 weeks after the therapy. The Diagnostic Criteria for the Most Common Intra-articular Temporomandibular Disorders was used to evaluate the effects of rehabilitation on the patients’ range of motions and the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS). For the statistical analysis, Pearson’s r correlation coefficient test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used. (3) Results: The results showed a significant improvement in the range of motion of the mandible movements. The level of improvement was dependent on the time from the incident until undergoing rehabilitation. (4) Conclusions: The stomatognathic physiotherapy applied increased the range of motion of the mandible and reduced pain levels to the expected range. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Advances in Dental Health)
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7 pages, 197 KiB  
Article
Poor Glycemic Control Increases Dental Risk in a Sri Lankan Population
Healthcare 2024, 12(3), 358; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12030358 - 31 Jan 2024
Viewed by 402
Abstract
Introduction: The aim of our study was to investigate the impact of diabetes-related factors on the dental disease outcomes of diabetes patients in Trincomalee, Sri Lanka. Materials and Methods: Dental data were collected from 80 type-2-diabetic individuals. A dental risk score was calculated [...] Read more.
Introduction: The aim of our study was to investigate the impact of diabetes-related factors on the dental disease outcomes of diabetes patients in Trincomalee, Sri Lanka. Materials and Methods: Dental data were collected from 80 type-2-diabetic individuals. A dental risk score was calculated based on the frequency of dental outcomes observed and categorized as low risk (≤3 dental outcomes) and high risk (>3 dental outcomes). Results: In this cohort of men and women with type 2 diabetes, there was a high frequency of periodontal related outcomes, including missing teeth (70%), gingival recessions (40%), tooth mobility (41%), and bleeding (20%). Thirty-nine (39%) of participants had high dental risk, while forty-nine (61%) had low risk. Conclusions: After controlling for age, participants with higher capillary blood glucose levels had 3-fold greater odds of a high dental risk score (OR = 2.93, 95%CI = 1.13, 7.61). We found that poor glycemic control indicated by elevated capillary blood glucose was associated with increased dental risk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Advances in Dental Health)
13 pages, 981 KiB  
Article
Comparison of Tooth Size Measurements in Orthodontics Using Conventional and 3D Digital Study Models
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(3), 730; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13030730 - 26 Jan 2024
Viewed by 440
Abstract
(1) Background: The objective of this study was to assess which digitization method produces the biggest deviation in the 3D images of tooth size from plaster models made using alginate impressions, which are considered the gold standard in orthodontics. (2) Methods: The sample [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The objective of this study was to assess which digitization method produces the biggest deviation in the 3D images of tooth size from plaster models made using alginate impressions, which are considered the gold standard in orthodontics. (2) Methods: The sample used in this study included 30 subjects (10 males and 20 females). Measurements were made on four types of models: (1) digital models obtained through intraoral scanning and digitized models of plaster cast made from (2) alginate impressions, (3) silicone impressions, and (4) conventional plaster models. Mesio-distal (MD) and buccal/labial–lingual/palatal (BL) dimensions were measured on the reference teeth of the right side of the jaw (central incisor, canine, first premolar, and first molar). Comparisons of tooth size between the methods were conducted using a repeated measurement analysis of variance and the Friedman test, while the intraclass correlation coefficient was used to determine agreement between the different methods. (3) Results: The results showed a similar level of agreement between the conventional and digital models in both jaws and the anterior, middle, and posterior segments. Better agreement was found for the MD measurements (r = 0.337–0.798; p ≤ 0.05) compared to the BL measurements (r = 0.016–0.542), with a smaller mean difference for MD (0.001–0.50 mm) compared to BL (0.02–1.48 mm) and a smaller measurement error for MD (0.20–0.39) compared to BL (0.38–0.89). There was more frequently a better level of agreement between 3D images than measurements made using a digital caliper on the plaster models with 3D images. (4) Conclusions: The differences in measurements between the digital models and conventional plaster models were small and clinically acceptable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Advances in Dental Health)
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