Virus-Like Particle and Nano-Particle Vaccines 2.0

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2022) | Viewed by 17630

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Hradec Králové, 50003 Hradec Králové, Czech Republic
Interests: toxins; drug design and development; antidotes for pesticide and nerve agent intoxications; Alzheimer’s disease; detergents as disinfectants, decontamination means; nanotechnology; health economics and pharmacoeconomics
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Guest Editor
Center for Advanced Technology, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland
Interests: superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles; carbon nanotubes; tissue engineering; 3D bioprinting; virus-like particles

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Guest Editor
Institute of Plant Genetics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 60-479 Poznań, Poland
Interests: plant-derived vaccines; injection-oral prime-boost immunisation; virus-like particles; HBV
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanotechnology is entering an increasing number of branches of science and common life. Nanoparticles of various types have been investigated for a wide variety of applications, including biomedicine. The special properties of virus-like particles have been used in vaccine development. Vaccination has saved many lives and vitally improved global health and life conditions. Nanobiotechnology could increase vaccine development. Nanoparticles, including virus-like particles, have extensive potential as vaccine vehicles, epitope carriers, adjuvants, and other nanobiomedical tools.

This Issue will be focused on nanobiotechnology applied in construction or modification of virus-like particles and vaccine development. Therefore, we welcome research articles, short communications, as well as review articles, of a high scientific level on the nanotechnological aspects of molecular virology, vaccinology, and immunology.

Prof. Dr. Kamil Kuca
Prof. Dr. Jakub D. Rybka
Prof. Dr. Tomasz Pniewski
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vaccines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanoparticles
  • virus-like particles
  • vaccines
  • molecular virology
  • immunology
  • nanotechnology
  • nanobiotechnology
  • nanobiomed

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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20 pages, 3126 KiB  
Article
Comparison of Bacterial Expression Systems Based on Potato Virus Y-like Particles for Vaccine Generation
by Anete Ogrina, Dace Skrastina, Ina Balke, Ieva Kalnciema, Juris Jansons, Martin F. Bachmann and Andris Zeltins
Vaccines 2022, 10(4), 485; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10040485 - 22 Mar 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2269
Abstract
Plant-based virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines have been studied for years, demonstrating their potential as antigen-presenting platforms. In this paper, we describe the development of, and compare between, simple Escherichia coli-based antigen display platforms for the generation of potato virus Y (PVY) VLP-derived [...] Read more.
Plant-based virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines have been studied for years, demonstrating their potential as antigen-presenting platforms. In this paper, we describe the development of, and compare between, simple Escherichia coli-based antigen display platforms for the generation of potato virus Y (PVY) VLP-derived vaccines, thus allowing the production of vaccines from a single bacterial cell culture. We constructed four systems with the major cat allergen Fel d 1; namely, direct fusion with plant virus PVY coat protein (CP), mosaic PVY VLPs, and two coexpression variants of conjugates (SpyTag/SpyCatcher) allowing coexpression and conjugation directly in E. coli cells. For control experiments, we included PVY VLPs chemically coupled with Fel d 1. All constructed PVY–Fel d 1 variants were well expressed and soluble, formed PVY-like filamentous particles, and were recognized by monoclonal Fel d 1 antibodies. Our results indicate that all vaccine variants induced high titers of anti-Fel d 1 antibodies in murine models. Mice that were immunized with the chemically coupled Fel d 1 antigen exhibited the highest antibody titers and antibody–antigen interaction specificity, as detected by binding avidity and recognition of native Fel d 1. IgG1 subclass antibodies were found to be the dominant IgG class against PVY–Fel d 1. PVY CP-derived VLPs represent an efficient platform for the comparison of various antigen presentation systems to help evaluate different vaccine designs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Virus-Like Particle and Nano-Particle Vaccines 2.0)
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12 pages, 1970 KiB  
Article
Monocytes Exposed to Immune Complexes Reduce pDC Type 1 Interferon Response to Vidutolimod
by Shakoora A. Sabree, Caitlin D. Lemke-Miltner, Sue E. Blackwell, Chaobo Yin, Aaron Bossler, Kareem Ebeid, Aliasger K. Salem and George J. Weiner
Vaccines 2021, 9(9), 982; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9090982 - 02 Sep 2021
Viewed by 2460
Abstract
Vidutolimod, also known as CMP-001, is a virus-like particle composed of the Qβ bacteriophage coat protein encasing a TLR9 agonist. Vidutolimod injected intratumorally is showing promise in early phase clinical trials based on its ability to alter the tumor microenvironment and induce an [...] Read more.
Vidutolimod, also known as CMP-001, is a virus-like particle composed of the Qβ bacteriophage coat protein encasing a TLR9 agonist. Vidutolimod injected intratumorally is showing promise in early phase clinical trials based on its ability to alter the tumor microenvironment and induce an anti-tumor immune response. We previously demonstrated that the in vivo efficacy of vidutolimod is dependent on the presence of anti-Qβ antibodies that enhance opsonization and uptake of vidutolimod by TLR9-expressing plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). Here, we evaluated the effect of immune complexes, including anti-Qβ-coated vidutolimod, on induction of Type 1 Interferon production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to vidutolimod and soluble TLR9 agonists. Immune complexes, including but not limited to anti-Qβ-coated vidutolimod, indirectly suppressed TLR9-mediated Type 1 Interferon production by pDCs in a monocyte-dependent manner. These findings indicate that anti-Qβ-coated vidutolimod has effects in addition to those mediated by TLR9 that could have important clinical implications for understanding the mechanism of action of this exciting new approach to in situ immunization and cancer immunotherapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Virus-Like Particle and Nano-Particle Vaccines 2.0)
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13 pages, 1534 KiB  
Article
A Novel Recombinant Virus-Like Particles Displaying B and T Cell Epitopes of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Offers Protective Immunity in Mice and Guinea Pigs
by Muhammad Naveed Anwar, Chunying Jiang, Di Di, Junjie Zhang, Shuang Guo, Xin Wang, Muddassar Hameed, Abdul Wahaab, Donghua Shao, Zongjie Li, Ke Liu, Beibei Li, Yafeng Qiu, Zhiyong Ma and Jianchao Wei
Vaccines 2021, 9(9), 980; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9090980 - 02 Sep 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2122
Abstract
Virus-like particles (VLPs) are non-replicative vectors for the delivery of heterologous epitopes and are considered one of the most potent inducers of cellular and humoral immune responses in mice and guinea pigs. In the present study, VLP-JEVe was constructed by the insertion of [...] Read more.
Virus-like particles (VLPs) are non-replicative vectors for the delivery of heterologous epitopes and are considered one of the most potent inducers of cellular and humoral immune responses in mice and guinea pigs. In the present study, VLP-JEVe was constructed by the insertion of six Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) envelope protein epitopes into different surface loop regions of PPV VP2 by the substitution of specific amino acid sequences without altering the assembly of the virus; subsequently, the protective efficacy of this VLP-JEVe was evaluated against JEV challenge in mice and guinea pigs. Mice immunized with the VLP-JEVe antigen developed high titers of neutralizing antibodies and 100% protection against lethal JEV challenge. The neutralizing and hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody responses were also induced in guinea pigs vaccinated with VLP-JEVe. In addition, immunization with VLP-JEVe in mice induced effective neutralizing antibodies and protective immunity against PPV (porcine parvovirus) challenge in guinea pigs. These studies suggest that VLP-JEVe produced as described here could be a potential candidate for vaccine development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Virus-Like Particle and Nano-Particle Vaccines 2.0)
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Review

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22 pages, 2162 KiB  
Review
Efficacy and Immune Response Elicited by Gold Nanoparticle- Based Nanovaccines against Infectious Diseases
by Anirban Sengupta, Mohammad Azharuddin, Noha Al-Otaibi and Jorma Hinkula
Vaccines 2022, 10(4), 505; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10040505 - 24 Mar 2022
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 5154
Abstract
The use of nanoparticles for developing vaccines has become a routine process for researchers and pharmaceutical companies. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are chemical inert, have low toxicity, and are easy to modify and functionalize, making them an attractive choice for nanovaccine development. GNPs are [...] Read more.
The use of nanoparticles for developing vaccines has become a routine process for researchers and pharmaceutical companies. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are chemical inert, have low toxicity, and are easy to modify and functionalize, making them an attractive choice for nanovaccine development. GNPs are modified for diagnostics and detection of many pathogens. The biocompatibility and biodistribution properties of GNPs render them ideal for use in clinical settings. They have excellent immune modulatory and adjuvant properties. They have been used as the antigen carrier for the delivery system to a targeted site. Tagging them with antibodies can direct the drug or antigen-carrying GNPs to specific tissues or cells. The physicochemical properties of the GNP, together with its dynamic immune response based on its size, shape, surface charge, and optical properties, make it a suitable candidate for vaccine development. The clear outcome of modulating dendritic cells, T and B lymphocytes, which trigger cytokine release in the host, indicates GNPs’ efficiency in combating pathogens. The high titer of IgG and IgA antibody subtypes and their enhanced capacity to neutralize pathogens are reported in multiple studies on GNP-based vaccine development. The major focus of this review is to illustrate the role of GNPs in developing nanovaccines against multiple infectious agents, ranging from viruses to bacteria and parasites. Although the use of GNPs has its shortcomings and a low but detectable level of toxicity, their benefits warrant investing more thought and energy into the development of novel vaccine strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Virus-Like Particle and Nano-Particle Vaccines 2.0)
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20 pages, 3259 KiB  
Review
Nanotechnology Interventions in the Management of COVID-19: Prevention, Diagnosis and Virus-Like Particle Vaccines
by Acharya Balkrishna, Vedpriya Arya, Akansha Rohela, Ashwani Kumar, Rachna Verma, Dinesh Kumar, Eugenie Nepovimova, Kamil Kuca, Naveen Thakur, Nikesh Thakur and Pankaj Kumar
Vaccines 2021, 9(10), 1129; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9101129 - 04 Oct 2021
Cited by 23 | Viewed by 4513
Abstract
SARS-CoV-2 claimed numerous lives and put nations on high alert. The lack of antiviral medications and the small number of approved vaccines, as well as the recurrence of adverse effects, necessitates the development of novel treatment ways to combat COVID-19. In this context, [...] Read more.
SARS-CoV-2 claimed numerous lives and put nations on high alert. The lack of antiviral medications and the small number of approved vaccines, as well as the recurrence of adverse effects, necessitates the development of novel treatment ways to combat COVID-19. In this context, using databases such as PubMed, Google Scholar, and Science Direct, we gathered information about nanotechnology’s involvement in the prevention, diagnosis and virus-like particle vaccine development. This review revealed that various nanomaterials like gold, polymeric, graphene and poly amino ester with carboxyl group coated magnetic nanoparticles have been explored for the fast detection of SARS-CoV-2. Personal protective equipment fabricated with nanoparticles, such as gloves, masks, clothes, surfactants, and Ag, TiO2 based disinfectants played an essential role in halting COVID-19 transmission. Nanoparticles are used not only in vaccine delivery, such as lipid nanoparticles mediated transport of mRNA-based Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, but also in the development of vaccine as the virus-like particles elicit an immune response. There are now 18 virus-like particle vaccines in pre-clinical development, with one of them, developed by Novavax, reported being in phase 3 trials. Due to the probability of upcoming COVID-19 waves, and the rise of new diseases, the future relevance of virus-like particles is imperative. Furthermore, psychosocial variables linked to vaccine reluctance constitute a critical problem that must be addressed immediately to avert pandemic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Virus-Like Particle and Nano-Particle Vaccines 2.0)
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