Studies in Neutron Stars

A special issue of Universe (ISSN 2218-1997). This special issue belongs to the section "Compact Objects".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2024) | Viewed by 2365

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Theoretical Physics, CNEA, Buenos Aires 1429, Argentina
2. CONICET, Godoy Cruz 2290, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires C1425FQB, Argentina
Interests: chiral effective models; finite temperature and density; QCD phase diagram; compact objects; magnetic fields

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Guest Editor
1. Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Wroclaw, 50-204 Wroclaw, Poland
2. Center for Advanced Systems Understanding (CASUS), D-02826 Görlitz, Germany
3. Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), D-01328 Dresden, Germany
Interests: quantum field theory at finite temperature; dense hadronic matter and QCD phase transitions; quark matter in heavy-ion collisions, in compact stars, their mergers and in supernova explosions; pair production in strong fields
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the detection of the gravitational wave signal from the inspiral phase of the binary neutron star merger GW170817 by the LIGO-Virgo Collaboration in 2017, the new era of multi-messenger astronomy has begun. In this new era, neutron stars (NSs) play a crucial role, be it as pulsars in isolation or in binaries, as magnetars, as proto-neutron stars after supernova explosion or as companions in a merger.

NSs are the only objects whose emission encompasses all the available multi-messenger tracers: electromagnetic waves, cosmic rays, neutrinos, and gravitational waves (GW). They are the only laboratories where we can study the most extreme phases of matter: not only can we probe extremes of gravity and electromagnetism, but also, strong and weak interaction can be studied in regimes that we cannot hope to explore on Earth. The study of these objects transcends the traditional astrophysical approach and requires a multidisciplinary effort that spans from particle and nuclear physics to astrophysics, from experiment to theory, from gravitational waves to the electromagnetic spectrum.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to collect new original contributions as well as reviews in the broad field of NS studies. We welcome contributions exploring all aspects of NSs, from theories to observations. Submit your paper and select the Journal “Universe” and the Special Issue “Studies on Neutron Stars” via: MDPI submission system. Papers will be published on a rolling basis, and we will be pleased to receive your contributions when they are ready to be submitted.

Dr. Ana Gabriela Grunfeld
Prof. Dr. David Blaschke
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Universe is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • neutron star cooling
  • quark matter in neutron stars
  • bayesian analysis
  • binary neutron star mergers
  • hypernuclear matter
  • gravitational waves
  • NICER
  • strange dwarfs
  • mass twin stars
  • perturbative QCD

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 1170 KiB  
Article
Compact Stars in the vBag Model and Its f-Mode Oscillations
by Heng-Yi Zhou, Wei Wei and Xia Zhou
Universe 2023, 9(6), 285; https://doi.org/10.3390/universe9060285 - 10 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1130
Abstract
Electromagnetic (EM) observations and gravitational wave (GW) measurements enable us to determine the mass and radius of neutron stars (NSs) and their tidal deformability, respectively. These parameters offer valuable insights into the properties of dense matter in NSs. In this study, the vector-interaction-enhanced [...] Read more.
Electromagnetic (EM) observations and gravitational wave (GW) measurements enable us to determine the mass and radius of neutron stars (NSs) and their tidal deformability, respectively. These parameters offer valuable insights into the properties of dense matter in NSs. In this study, the vector-interaction-enhanced bag model (vBag model) is employed to investigate strange and hybrid stars’ properties. The parameters of the vBag model are constrained using multi-messenger observations, revealing that strange stars are incompatible with current observations. In contrast, hybrid stars can exhibit a substantial mixed phase region and a thin hadronic shell. Furthermore, we present the frequencies and damping time of fundamental mode (f-mode) oscillations of hybrid stars and test their universal relations with compactness and tidal deformability. The findings indicate that the presence of mixed phase components leads to larger frequencies and shorter damping time of the f-mode oscillation of hybrid stars, and the softer equation of state (EoS) affects this behavior more significantly. The universal relations of hybrid stars in the vBag model can be described by fourth-order/seventh-order polynomials, which do not break the previous results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Studies in Neutron Stars)
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Review

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25 pages, 2208 KiB  
Review
Measuring the Lense–Thirring Orbital Precession and the Neutron Star Moment of Inertia with Pulsars
by Huanchen Hu and Paulo C. C. Freire
Universe 2024, 10(4), 160; https://doi.org/10.3390/universe10040160 - 28 Mar 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 564
Abstract
Neutron stars (NSs) are compact objects that host the densest forms of matter in the observable universe, providing unique opportunities to study the behaviour of matter at extreme densities. While precision measurements of NS masses through pulsar timing have imposed effective constraints on [...] Read more.
Neutron stars (NSs) are compact objects that host the densest forms of matter in the observable universe, providing unique opportunities to study the behaviour of matter at extreme densities. While precision measurements of NS masses through pulsar timing have imposed effective constraints on the equation of state (EoS) of dense matter, accurately determining the radius or moment of inertia (MoI) of an NS remains a major challenge. This article presents a detailed review on measuring the Lense–Thirring (LT) precession effect in the orbit of binary pulsars, which would give access to the MoI of NSs and offer further constraints on the EoS. We discuss the suitability of certain classes of binary pulsars for measuring the LT precession from the perspective of binary star evolution and highlight five pulsars that exhibit properties promising to realise these goals in the near future. Finally, discoveries of compact binaries with shorter orbital periods hold the potential to greatly enhance measurements of the MoI of NSs. The MoI measurements of binary pulsars are pivotal to advancing our understanding of matter at supranuclear densities, as well as improving the precision of gravity tests, such as the orbital decay due to gravitational wave emission, and of tests of alternative gravity theories. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Studies in Neutron Stars)
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