Toxicology Research of Foodborne Contaminants

A special issue of Toxics (ISSN 2305-6304). This special issue belongs to the section "Agrochemicals and Food Toxicology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 March 2024) | Viewed by 818

Special Issue Editors

College of Veterinary Medicine, Henan Agricultural University, Zhengzhou, China
Interests: animal toxicology and animal nutrition metabolic disease; toxicology of heavy metal; toxicology of mycotoxin
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Guest Editor
College of Veterinary Medicine, Sichuan Agricultural University, Ya'an 611130, China
Interests: animal disease; animal physiology; animal nutrition

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Guest Editor
College of Veterinary Medicine, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China
Interests: animal internal medicine and toxic diseases; animal nutritional metabolic diseases and immunity; intestinal microbes; probiotic fermentation; obesity; liver fibrosis; cholestatic liver injury
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the vast development of the economy and technology, our lifestyles have changed significantly. However, while these changes provide us with convenience, they also convey El Nino, environmental pollution, food safety issues and other ecological concerns to us, among which food safety is attracting heightened attention; this is owing to  increases in people’s awareness of safety and the development of mass spectrometry.

Due to the effects of human activities, agricultural production, industrialization, mineral extraction and the abuse of food additives, foodborne contaminants, such as pesticide residues, mycotoxins, heavy metals, plasticizers, microplastic particles and food additives, threaten human and animal health through the food chain. The contamination of food production and storage is inevitable, but it causes significant losses. In order to eliminate foodborne contaminants, an elucidation of the underlying mechanism of their toxic effects on human and animals is urgently needed.

To address the increasing risk of pollution and contamination in the food industry, detoxification measures, anti-toxic supplements and other precautions and therapeutic measures are demanded.

Dr. Xu Yang
Prof. Dr. Zhihua Ren
Dr. Yunhuan Liu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pesticide residues
  • mycotoxins
  • heavy metal
  • plasticizer
  • microplastic particles
  • food additives
  • toxicant metabolism
  • alleviation and treatment

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

17 pages, 12659 KiB  
Article
Rat Hepatocytes Protect against Lead–Cadmium-Triggered Apoptosis Based on Autophagy Activation
by Junshu Xue, Huimao Liu, Tianyi Yin, Xun Zhou, Xu Song, Yuanfeng Zou, Lixia Li, Renyong Jia, Yuping Fu, Xinghong Zhao and Zhongqiong Yin
Toxics 2024, 12(4), 285; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics12040285 - 12 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Lead and cadmium are foodborne contaminants that threaten human and animal health. It is well known that lead and cadmium produce hepatotoxicity; however, defense mechanisms against the co-toxic effects of lead and cadmium remain unknown. We investigated the mechanism of autophagy (defense mechanism) [...] Read more.
Lead and cadmium are foodborne contaminants that threaten human and animal health. It is well known that lead and cadmium produce hepatotoxicity; however, defense mechanisms against the co-toxic effects of lead and cadmium remain unknown. We investigated the mechanism of autophagy (defense mechanism) against the co-induced toxicity of lead and cadmium in rat hepatocytes (BRL-3A cells). Cultured rat liver BRL-3A cell lines were co-cultured with 10, 20, 40 μM lead and 2.5, 5, 10 μM cadmium alone and in co-culture for 12 h and exposed to 5 mM 3-Methyladenine (3-MA), 10 μM rapamycin (Rapa), and 50 nM Beclin1 siRNA to induce cellular autophagy. Our results show that treatment of BRL-3A cells with lead and cadmium significantly decreased the cell viability, increased intracellular reactive oxygen species levels, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential levels, and induced apoptosis, which are factors leading to liver injury, and cell damage was exacerbated by co-exposure to lead–cadmium. In addition, the results showed that lead and cadmium co-treatment induced autophagy. We further observed that the suppression of autophagy with 3-MA or Beclin1 siRNA promoted lead–cadmium-induced apoptosis, whereas enhancement of autophagy with Rapa suppressed lead–cadmium-induced apoptosis. These results demonstrated that co-treatment with lead and cadmium induces apoptosis in BRL-3A cells. Interestingly, the activation of autophagy provides cells with a self-protective mechanism against induced apoptosis. This study provides insights into the role of autophagy in lead–cadmium-induced apoptosis, which may be beneficial for the treatment of lead–cadmium-induced liver injury. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Toxicology Research of Foodborne Contaminants)
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