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Tourism and Photography

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Tourism, Culture, and Heritage".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 May 2021) | Viewed by 7959

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Management, Swansea University, Swansea, UK
Interests: destination marketing; destination management; smart destinations; technology; accessibility; disability; sustainable development; digitization; leadership; employment; corporate responsibility; climate change; over-tourism
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Guest Editor
Hertfordshire Business School, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, Hertfordshire United Kingdom
Interests: tourism planning; responsible tourism; visual research methods; participant-generated image research; volunteer employed photography

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Photography and photographs have long been fundamental to the modern phenomenon of tourism. Urry’s (1990) theory of the ‘tourist gaze’ hypothesized that tourists’ photographs are a key component of the system of reproduction of modern tourism, in which tourists are motivated to travel to see places represented in the photographs shown to them by tourism providers—in holiday brochures, on posters, and in media advertisements—such that they take photographs of themselves and their families at the same locations in order to prove that they have been there. It is perhaps surprising, therefore, that photography has failed to gain much traction in academic research, either in terms of studying holiday photography as an activity or using the resulting photographs as a source of data that can enable a better understanding of tourists’ cognitions, emotions, and behaviors more generally. Photographic practice therefore remains an under-studied subject, yet one that is worthy of attention in trying to understand how tourists interact with the cultural, economic, and natural environments of the destination they are visiting. The use of photographs as data, meanwhile, remains a relatively under-exploited resource for academic researchers to tap into. While photographs have long been used for the purpose of helping to enrich responses in surveys and interviews (a technique known as photo-elicitation), there has recently been a growing interest in using photographs uploaded to social media as ‘big data’, as well as in the use of participatory photography methods such as volunteer-employed photography. These methods are still, however, in their infancy, and there is much still to learn about how best to apply them. Their potential is also constantly being enhanced by the introduction of new technologies, such as the smartphone, and this requires best practice to be continually reassessed. This Special Issue will seek to address these subjects, as well as other related topics, examining not only the practices of photography in the tourism context but also the use of photographs as data in the study of tourism.

Prof. Dr. Brian Garrod
Dr. Nika Balomenou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Photography
  • Postcards
  • Photo-elicitation methods
  • Participatory photo methods
  • Photographic practice
  • Photos as (big) data

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 2261 KiB  
Article
Understanding Diver Behavior on Underwater Cultural Heritage: Enriching the Observation Record Using Video Methods
by Joanne Edney, Kay Dimmock and William E. Boyd
Sustainability 2021, 13(10), 5601; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13105601 - 17 May 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2533
Abstract
Successful underwater heritage management requires a sound understanding of visitor behavior. Primary visitors to underwater heritage sites are divers whose behavior can pose risks to the integrity of site cultural heritage and tourism values. This study seeks to understand wreck diver in-water behavior. [...] Read more.
Successful underwater heritage management requires a sound understanding of visitor behavior. Primary visitors to underwater heritage sites are divers whose behavior can pose risks to the integrity of site cultural heritage and tourism values. This study seeks to understand wreck diver in-water behavior. Conventional observation of diver behavior is limiting. Wearable cameras are becoming popular across many recreational activities and potentially expand the scope and quality of diver observation. Video observation is rarely used in such research. This article demonstrates the potential of video observation, describing the analysis of first-person video records to explore details of diver behavior on shipwrecks. The evidence demonstrates that while most divers behaved responsibly, a few contributed to most contact behaviors. The analysis details this behavior, identifying, for example, that deliberate holding and touching comprised most contacts. Such findings on diver behavior inform heritage and tourism management decisions and provide a baseline for future studies. Methodologically, the study demonstrates the power of this method of observing divers and other recreationists. This is particularly valuable for researching recreationalists in confined spaces, such as caves or shipwrecks. The quality of results allows for further evidence-based examination of motivations, values, intentions and meanings underlying observed diver behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tourism and Photography)
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13 pages, 609 KiB  
Article
Chinese Tourists’ Barriers to Sharing Travel Photos in WeChat
by Fangxuan (Sam) Li
Sustainability 2020, 12(3), 887; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12030887 - 24 Jan 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3632
Abstract
Given the widespread availability of mobile internet and smart phones, photo-sharing on social networking services (SNS) has attracted a great deal of academic attention. Even though the number of photos shared on SNS is still increasing due to the increasing number of SNS [...] Read more.
Given the widespread availability of mobile internet and smart phones, photo-sharing on social networking services (SNS) has attracted a great deal of academic attention. Even though the number of photos shared on SNS is still increasing due to the increasing number of SNS users, some existing SNS users have now stopped sharing their travel photos on SNS. To fill the research gap, this paper explores Chinese tourists’ barriers to sharing travel photos in WeChat. Based on 20 semi-structured interviews, this study identifies four barriers, including perceived risk, guanxi maintenance, personality, and disclosure. Given the importance of harmony in Chinese culture, this study also highlights the strong link between guanxi maintenance and Chinese visitors’ willingness to share travel photos in WeChat. This paper discusses both the theoretical contribution and the practical implications of this study in the conclusion section. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tourism and Photography)
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