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Hydrogeological Environment and Water Resources Research

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sustainability and Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 April 2023) | Viewed by 3525

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering and Architecture (DICAr) and Reseach Centre on Water (CRA), University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
Interests: development and application of numerical models for the analysis of water flows; urban hydraulic constructions; water resources management; hydrogeology; water quality; stormwater management
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering and Architecture (DICAr) and Reseach Centre on Water (CRA), University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
Interests: development and application of numerical models for the analysis of multi-phase non-Newtonian flows with interaction phenomena; fast landslides; impulsive waves; wind waves; filtration in porous media; floating bodies; free-surface flows; sediment transport; waste-water treatment reactors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering and Architecture (DICAr) and Reseach Centre on Water (CRA), University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
Interests: groundwater flow modelling; applications of MODFLOW/finite difference methods for the analysis of groundwater flow and transport; surface water – groundwater interactions; stream temperature energy balance modelling; thermal infrared imaging; pro-glacial hydrology; human impacts on hydrologic/hydrogeologic processes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Hydrogeology and water resources are broad research topics involving monitoring and modelling strategies, prediction approaches, management issues, and mitigation/adaptation/conservation strategies related to sustainability. The field supports a variety of research applications, that have evolved from a traditional emphasis on water availability assessment and allocation, and the definition of cost-effective operating strategies to a wider scope, which includes environmental implications, stakeholder concerns, social welfare, and human dimensions. Thus, we now face the challenge of an integrated and interdisciplinary research framework.

Innovative research and advanced modelling techniques are needed in the domains of study and technology focusing on hydrogeology and water resource interactions with climate and anthropogenic forcings, implications on the function and sustainability of ecosystems, water resource management and conservation practices, as well as on legislation and policy issues from local, regional, or global perspectives.

This Special Issue “Hydrogeological Environment and Water Resources Research” in the Sustainability journal aims to identify, discuss, and address the above challenges by seeking research and review manuscripts dealing with relevant research fields.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to: 

  • hydrogeological and hydrological monitoring and modelling; novel techniques for tracing water from surface to acquifer;
  • new capabilities, as well as limitations of machine learning models for predictions;
  • the role of uncertainty due to model factors in decision making;
  • Earth system change;
  • vulnerability of water resources to climate variations;
  • impact of growing population, increasing impermeability, and economy on natural resources;
  • coupled human-natural systems;
  • consequences of human disturbance on various Earth system processes;
  • change over time of hydrological cycle;
  • hydrological systems and ecosystems’ sustainability;
  • water management and adaptations under climate and anthropogenic challenges;
  • water-related natural hazards prediction and mitigation;
  • the present and the future of hydrogeology and water resources research.

In this Special Issue, the goal is for authors to respond to developing solid research on the aforementioned issues in a context of the mainstream literature on hydrogeology and water resources, with a strong encouragement of interdisciplinary research. The intention in this context is to encourage scientists who promote realistic, advanced and pioneering approaches to contribute to the various issues of macrothematics, taking the existing knowledge a step further.

Dr. Sara Todeschini
Dr. Sauro Manenti
Dr. Emily Alyssa Baker
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hydrogeology
  • water resources
  • monitoring
  • modelling
  • human-natural systems
  • research
  • management
  • conservation
  • adaptation
  • sustainability

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

25 pages, 8107 KiB  
Article
Joint Estimation of Adsorptive Contaminant Source and Hydraulic Conductivity Using an Iterative Local Updating Ensemble Smoother with Geometric Inflation Selection
by Xuemin Xia, Xiang Li, Yue Sun and Guoqiang Cheng
Sustainability 2023, 15(2), 1211; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15021211 - 9 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1042
Abstract
The joint estimation of groundwater contaminant source characteristics and hydraulic conductivity is of great significance for reactive contaminant transport models in heterogeneous subsurface media. The accurate determination of the sorption parameters of such contaminants is also a key prerequisite for estimating the parameters [...] Read more.
The joint estimation of groundwater contaminant source characteristics and hydraulic conductivity is of great significance for reactive contaminant transport models in heterogeneous subsurface media. The accurate determination of the sorption parameters of such contaminants is also a key prerequisite for estimating the parameters of the groundwater system. In this study, to investigate the impact of the sorption parameter field on the accuracy of hydraulic conductivity and source characteristics estimation, numerical experiments were conducted in a synthetic aquifer considering the contaminant sorption process in groundwater models with varying sorption parameter settings. Iterative local updating ensemble smoother with geometric inflation selection (ILUES-GEO) was employed to assimilate hydraulic head and contaminant concentration data to jointly estimate the contaminant source information and hydraulic conductivity in a heterogeneous aquifer. The results indicated that the ILUES-GEO successfully recovers contaminant source information simultaneously with hydraulic conductivity, and its performance improves as more accurate sorption parameters are introduced. Furthermore, the influence of the ILUES algorithm parameters and ensemble size is investigated to improve the estimation accuracy. Additionally, the characterization of contaminant sources and hydraulic conductivity fields is influenced by the number and locations of measurements. This study can help to understand the significance of sorption parameter setting for the joint estimation of reactive contaminant source and hydraulic parameters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrogeological Environment and Water Resources Research)
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35 pages, 13797 KiB  
Article
Hydraulically Disconnected Rivers in the Highlands and Southern Riverine Plain of S.E Australia
by Phillip G. Macumber
Sustainability 2023, 15(1), 865; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15010865 - 3 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1552
Abstract
The rivers of south-eastern Australia flow within a complex meander tract (Coonambidgal Formation) formed by phases of Quaternary stream activity. Pumping tests, hydrochemistry and groundwater monitoring of the Campaspe, Loddon and Murray River Valleys show that for significant parts of their courses, the [...] Read more.
The rivers of south-eastern Australia flow within a complex meander tract (Coonambidgal Formation) formed by phases of Quaternary stream activity. Pumping tests, hydrochemistry and groundwater monitoring of the Campaspe, Loddon and Murray River Valleys show that for significant parts of their courses, the rivers and their associated strip aquifers form a single integrated hydraulic unit perched above and disconnected from the regional water table by an underlying aquitard developed at the top of a varyingly thick and temporally dynamic vadose zone. Loss to the regional aquifer is not restricted to the riverbed but covers the entire width of the Coonambidgal Formation aquifer, which is one or two orders of magnitude greater. River-bed flux is not a measure of net river loss. Through diffusion and dispersion from the overlying saturated zone, aquitard enhancement or development is augmented by chemical processes active towards the top of the vadose zone. Unlike river-bed clogging, chemical clogging of aquifers is progressive and permanent. Post-European instability in the studied groundwater systems has seen catchment wide groundwater rises of up to 0.25 m/y. or 25 metre over the last century. Under the pre-existing norm of deeper water tables, disconnected streams would have been more numerous with the present aquitards being a legacy of that regime. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrogeological Environment and Water Resources Research)
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