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Comprehensive Waste Management with Optimizing Green Technology in Sustainable Environment

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Waste and Recycling".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 8 September 2024 | Viewed by 2033

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Environment & Sustainable Development, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221011, India
Interests: waste management; ecotoxicology; sustainable agriculture
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Guest Editor
Wetland Hydrology Research Laboratory, Faculty of Environment, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada
Interests: soil and groundwater pollution; fate and transport of napls; multiphase flow; remediation, restoration, and management of polluted sites; soil microbiome; wetland hydrology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Waste management encompasses the comprehensive process of efficiently handling and controlling discarded materials, from their point of origin to final disposal. This process involves various stages, including waste collection, transportation, and treatment. A well-designed waste management system incorporates recycling practices, which play a crucial role in reducing the extraction of virgin materials and promoting the principles of the circular economy. To achieve sustainable waste management, several key strategies have been identified, including refuse/rethink, resell/reuse, reduce, repair, remanufacture, refurbish, repurpose, recover, recycle, and re-mine. These strategies aim to mitigate pollution and prevent waste generation. However, the successful implementation of waste management systems requires innovative approaches such as vermicomposting and composting, and refuse drive fuel (RDF), which modernize and enhance their effectiveness through the use of technology. The escalating levels of waste products from various industries and sectors, such as pharmaceuticals, agriculture, logistics, and textiles, are a direct result of rapid industrialization and economic development. Projections indicate that solid waste production will reach a staggering 2.2 billion tons by 2025. Consequently, countries worldwide are implementing measures to minimize waste generation by adopting green and circular practices, which aim to close the supply chain loop. In essence, this entails transitioning from a linear production model that generates excessive waste to a circular economy that promotes resource efficiency. Circular practices are specifically focused on waste reduction at every stage of production, encompassing all levels of the supply chain. Their overarching goal is to improve sustainable performance. While the adoption of green and circular practices can significantly enhance resource utilization and waste management, technological innovation (TI) has also played a pivotal role in revolutionizing industrial operations and facilitating the effective implementation of these practices. Technological advancements have brought about transformative changes that complement and strengthen the adoption of green and circular principles. In conclusion, waste management is a multifaceted process that requires the integration of recycling practices and innovative approaches like vermicomposting/composting. The adoption of green and circular practices has become increasingly crucial given the escalating waste production resulting from global industrialization. These practices focus on reducing waste generation and improving sustainability at each level of the production process. Moreover, technological innovations have played a vital role in optimizing the implementation of green and circular practices, further enhancing their efficacy in waste management and resource utilization.

In this context, this Special Issue, titled “Comprehensive Waste Management with Optimizing Green Technology in Sustainable Environment”, aims to present cutting-edge information on various approaches to green technology, vermicomposting, optimization, challenges, and value-added products to maintain environmental sustainability. The scope of this Special Issue includes, but is not limited to, the following areas: ecotoxicology, solid waste management, sustainable agriculture, green technology, bioremediation, and vermicomposting from waste.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Waste and its associated problems;
  • Risk associated with improper waste management;
  • Bioconversion of organic waste for solid waste management and sustainable agriculture;
  • Effect of recycling organic component of waste/agricultural waste on soil and plant;
  • Waste management and agricultural amendments-soil microbial ecology;
  • Management of urban solid waste: Vermicomposting a sustainable option;
  • Vermicomposting of waste: a zero-waste approach for waste management;
  • Transformation of biomass waste into sustainable organic fertilizers;
  • Ecotoxicological status and risk assessment of heavy metals and other contaminants present in municipal solid wastes;
  • Plastic waste management: challenges and opportunities;
  • Microbiome-based waste management and bioremediation.

Dr. Rajeev Pratap Singh
Dr. Diganta B. Das
Dr. Pankaj Kumar Gupta
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • waste management
  • microbiome
  • vermicomposting
  • refuse drive fuel
  • sustainability
  • green technology
  • ecotoxicology
  • technological innovation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 5481 KiB  
Article
Influence of the Steel Slag Particle Size on the Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Concrete
by Maohui Li, Youjun Lu, Yajuan Liu, Jingjun Chu, Tongsheng Zhang and Wei Wang
Sustainability 2024, 16(5), 2083; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16052083 - 2 Mar 2024
Viewed by 963
Abstract
The present paper probes into the influence of the steel slag particle size on the mechanical properties and microstructure of concrete, with steel slag serving as the primary raw material. Steel slag with different particle sizes was selected as the partial substitute material [...] Read more.
The present paper probes into the influence of the steel slag particle size on the mechanical properties and microstructure of concrete, with steel slag serving as the primary raw material. Steel slag with different particle sizes was selected as the partial substitute material for concrete by mechanical grinding. The influence of steel slag on the compressive strength, bending strength, and microstructure of concrete was determined by laser particle size analyzer, specific surface area analyzer, strength experiment, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results show that mechanical grinding has significant effects on the particle size distribution and specific surface area of the steel slag. The optimal grinding time is 20 min and the specific surface area is 0.65 m2/g. D10, D50 and D90 are 0.91 μm, 16.57 μm and 46.40 μm, respectively. The steel slag with a fine particle size can better fill the pores in concrete and improve the compactness, thus enhancing the mechanical properties of concrete. The change in the steel slag particle size does not change the type of hydration products, but the smaller the particle size of steel slag, the better the gelling activity, the larger the hydration products, the denser the structure, and the better the mechanical properties. Therefore, the present study provides an important theoretical basis and practical guidance for the application of steel slag as an additive in the concrete industry. Full article
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13 pages, 1847 KiB  
Article
Reliability of Municipal Solid Waste Landfills within the Eurocode Framework
by Filip Dodigović and Krešo Ivandić
Sustainability 2024, 16(2), 675; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16020675 - 12 Jan 2024
Viewed by 657
Abstract
Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill slope failures can have significant consequences for the economy, environment, and human health. One potential cause of slope failure is insufficient reliability, resulting from inadequate design. The usual practice in the design of MSW landfills involves utilizing established [...] Read more.
Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill slope failures can have significant consequences for the economy, environment, and human health. One potential cause of slope failure is insufficient reliability, resulting from inadequate design. The usual practice in the design of MSW landfills involves utilizing established geotechnical codes, such as Eurocode 7 (EC7), to perform slope stability assessments. Considering the substantial heterogeneity of MSW relative to soil, questions arise regarding the justification of such an approach in the design of MSW landfills. This study examines the suitability of applying EC7 in MSW landfill design, analyzing the stability and reliability of landfill slopes across various heights, front slope angles, design approaches, and consequence classes. This study finds that, in most cases considered, EC7 does not ensure an adequate level of reliability for MSW landfill slopes. Therefore, it is suggested that EC7 should be complemented with specific guidelines for incorporating MSW in geotechnical analyses to achieve the desired structural reliability. Adopting this strategy will not only enhance the reliability of landfill design but also promote the development of solutions that are economically and environmentally sustainable. Full article
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