Motivational Theories in Physical Activity and Competitive Sports

A special issue of Sports (ISSN 2075-4663).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2019) | Viewed by 9771

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Kinesiology and Sport Management, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, USA
2. Education Academy, Vytautas Magnus University, Kaunas, Lithuania
Interests: sport and exercise psychology; meta-analysis; achievement goals
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Guest Editor
Faculty of Sport Science, Ege University, Bornova, Izmir 35100, Turkey
Interests: achievement goal theory; self-determination theory; psychological well-being
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Motivation is a vital area of study in physical activity and competitive sports. First off, we live in a world predominately with children and youth who do not meet recommended daily guidelines for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Advances in motivation theory research are needed to design interventions to increase daily physical activity in children and youth. Of course, advances are needed for people of all ages although more pockets of active adults seemingly exist across the world than children. Secondly, motivation theories are vital for understanding thoughts, emotions, and actions taken within physical activity and competitive sports settings by both the actors and spectators.

The focus of this Special Issue of Sports is a broad call for innovative research and systematic reviews on physical activity and competitive sports. The hope is to go beyond only cross-sectional research. Several meta-analyses covering the dominant motivation theories in physical activity and competitive sports clearly demonstrate the global nature of this research. Thus, given the spread of motivation theory testing around the globe, research concerned with motivation questionnaire develop is welcome. Last, all motivation theories are welcome in this Special Issue: Achievement Goal Theory, Self-Determination Theory, Theory of Planned Behavior, Implicit Self-Theories, and so on.

Prof. Marc Lochbaum
Assoc. Prof. Zişan Kazak
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Achievement Goal Theory
  • Self-Determination Theory
  • Trans-Contextual Model
  • Hierarchical Model of Intrinsic Motivation
  • Implicit Self-Theories
  • Theory of Planned Behaviour
  • Transtheoretical Model (Stages of Change)

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

8 pages, 394 KiB  
Article
Autonomous Motivation as a Mediator Between an Empowering Climate and Enjoyment in Male Volleyball Players
by Sofia Mosqueda, Jeanette M. López-Walle, Pablo Gutiérrez-García, Juan García-Verazaluce and José Tristán
Sports 2019, 7(6), 153; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7060153 - 25 Jun 2019
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3802
Abstract
The objective of this work was to analyze a mediation model concerning the perception of an empowering climate generated by a coach and enjoyment through the autonomous motivation of athletes. The sample consisted of 71 elite male volleyball players from six countries. The [...] Read more.
The objective of this work was to analyze a mediation model concerning the perception of an empowering climate generated by a coach and enjoyment through the autonomous motivation of athletes. The sample consisted of 71 elite male volleyball players from six countries. The age range was 14 to 18 years (M = 16.5, SD = 0.96). The relationships between the perception of an empowering climate, autonomous motivation, and enjoyment were positive and significant. The mediation model showed that autonomous motivation acts as a mediator in the relationship between the perception of an empowering climate generated by the coach and the enjoyment reported by the athletes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Motivational Theories in Physical Activity and Competitive Sports)
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11 pages, 262 KiB  
Article
Individual Motivations, Motivational Climate, Enjoyment, and Physical Competence Perceptions in Finnish Team Sport Athletes: A Prospective and Retrospective Study
by Thaís Zanatta, Christoph Rottensteiner, Niilo Konttinen and Marc Lochbaum
Sports 2018, 6(4), 165; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports6040165 - 5 Dec 2018
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 4020
Abstract
Despite the high rates of participation in sports clubs among Finnish youth, only a few reach elite levels. This study investigated a number of motivational factors, enjoyment, and perceived physical competence perceptions of Finnish youth athletes in their adolescence and then four years [...] Read more.
Despite the high rates of participation in sports clubs among Finnish youth, only a few reach elite levels. This study investigated a number of motivational factors, enjoyment, and perceived physical competence perceptions of Finnish youth athletes in their adolescence and then four years later to help understand determinants of elite level attainment. The sample consisted of 824 young athletes born in 1995, who were playing soccer, ice hockey, or basketball in the Finnish sports club system. As youths, participants completed measurements of the perceived task and ego climates, task and ego goal orientations, autonomous and controlled motivations, amotivation, sport enjoyment, and perceived physical competence. Retrospectively, the same participants completed measurements of task, ego, social relatedness, and autonomy supportive climates four years later. All variables were compared to self-reported elite status attainment. Additionally, we examined some demographic characteristics. Prospectively, the self-reported elite athletes (n = 79) reported significantly (p < 0.05) higher perceptions of a task climate, perceived physical competence, sport enjoyment, and autonomous motivation and a lower level of amotivation compared to nonelite athletes. The meaningfulness (Hedges’ g) of the significant differences ranged from small to moderate. Retrospectively, elite athletes indicated significantly (p < 0.05) higher perception of a task climate and a social relatedness climate during their sporting career. Hedges’ g ranged from moderate to large in meaningfulness. The findings highlighted the importance of focusing on the positive aspects surrounding elite athletes’ perceptions to promote youth athletes’ development, while not discounting the importance of physical size and talent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Motivational Theories in Physical Activity and Competitive Sports)
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