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Physical Activity and Healthy Habits for Sustainable Well-Being

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2023) | Viewed by 4090

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Division of Research & Innovation, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, QLD, Australia
Interests: sport psychology; elite performance; mood; emotion; psychometrics

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Guest Editor
1. Department of Kinesiology and Sport Management, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, USA
2. Education Academy, Vytautas Magnus University, Kaunas, Lithuania
Interests: sport and exercise psychology; meta-analysis; achievement goals
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Education, Health and Well-Being, University of Wolverhampton, Walsall, UK
Interests: sport psychology; emotion; mood; interventions; self-regulation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The global prevalence of physical health challenges, such as sedentary lifestyles and obesity, and psychological disorders, such as depression and anxiety, is at an all-time high [1,2]. This has prompted the World Health Organization to adopt the goal of promoting a greater abundance of physically active individuals to help create a healthier world, via its “Global Action Plan on Physical Activity 2018–2030” [3].  The purpose of this Special Issue of Sustainability is to present evidence on how healthy habits, especially those involving physical activity, promote sustainable physical and mental well-being. The scope of the Special Issue extends across the range of psychological, physical, dietary, economic, environmental, social, and cultural influences that impinge upon human well-being, with a particular emphasis on the role of physical activity in all its various forms. Contributions that focus on innovative ways to assess well-being indices, summarize the available evidence relating to well-being variables, report on the efficacy of well-being interventions, and/or present novel theoretical models of the well-being process, are especially welcome. This Special Issue will supplement the existing literature by presenting the latest original and summative research from world-leading experts in their respective fields of endeavour from across the globe. All types of research methodology are welcomed. The latest date for submissions is 30th September 2022, although earlier submissions would be very welcome.

References

  1. Waxman, A.; World Health Assembly. WHO global strategy on diet, physical activity and health. Food Nutr Bull. 2004, 25, 292-302. doi:10.1177/156482650402500310. PMID: 15460274.
  2. Ferrari, A.J.; Santomauro, D.F.; Mantilla Herrera, A.M.; Shadid, J.; Ashbaugh, C.; Erskine, H.E.; et al. Global, regional, and national burden of 12 mental disorders in 204 countries and territories, 1990–2019: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019. Lancet Psychiat. 2022, 9, 137-150. https://doi.org/10.1016/S2215-0366(21)00395-3
  3. Global Action Plan on Physical Activity 2018–2030: More Active People for a Healthier World. World Health Organization 2018. https://apps.who.int/iris/handle/10665/272722.

Prof. Dr. Peter C. Terry
Prof. Dr. Marc Lochbaum
Prof. Dr. Andrew M. Lane
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • mental health
  • lifestyle, exercise
  • sport
  • habit formation
  • psychology
  • active

Published Papers (2 papers)

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16 pages, 833 KiB  
Article
Physical Activity and Healthy Habits Influence Mood Profile Clusters in a Lithuanian Population
by Peter C. Terry, Renée L. Parsons-Smith, Albertas Skurvydas, Aušra Lisinskienė, Daiva Majauskienė, Dovilė Valančienė, Sydney Cooper and Marc Lochbaum
Sustainability 2022, 14(16), 10006; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141610006 - 12 Aug 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1505
Abstract
Moods have been investigated previously in a range of cultural contexts. In our study, we investigated if six mood profiles previously identified, termed the iceberg, inverse Everest, inverse iceberg, shark fin, submerged, and surface profiles, were also evident among a Lithuanian sample. A [...] Read more.
Moods have been investigated previously in a range of cultural contexts. In our study, we investigated if six mood profiles previously identified, termed the iceberg, inverse Everest, inverse iceberg, shark fin, submerged, and surface profiles, were also evident among a Lithuanian sample. A Lithuanian translation of the Brunel Mood Scale (BRUMS-LTU) was completed by a sample of 746 participants (male = 199, female = 547) aged from 17–78 years (M = 41.8 years, SD = 11.4 year). Seeded k-means cluster analysis clearly identified the six hypothesized mood profiles, the prevalence of which reflected previous findings. Cluster prevalence varied significantly by sex, age, exercise and smoking status, frequency of overeating, and self-rated health of participants. Male participants and older adults were under-represented for the inverse Everest profile and over-represented for the iceberg profile. Those who reported more healthy habits (i.e., exerciser, non-smoker, rarely overeat) and those reporting better self-rated health were over-represented for the iceberg profile and under-represented for negative mood profiles; namely, the inverse Everest, inverse iceberg, and shark fin profiles. Findings supported the cross-cultural invariance of the mood profile clusters and confirmed the link between unhealthy habits and negative mood profiles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Healthy Habits for Sustainable Well-Being)
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10 pages, 1253 KiB  
Brief Report
Effects of Multimodal Physical and Cognitive Fitness Training on Sustaining Mental Health and Job Readiness in a Military Cohort
by Paul Taylor, Frederick Rohan Walker, Andrew Heathcote and Eugene Aidman
Sustainability 2023, 15(11), 9016; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15119016 - 2 Jun 2023
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Abstract
Drawing on the emerging area of workplace sustainability, this study sought to measure the effects of multimodal physical and cognitive fitness training on sustaining mental health and job readiness via impacts on subjective burnout, mental wellbeing, and resilience in a military cohort. Volunteer [...] Read more.
Drawing on the emerging area of workplace sustainability, this study sought to measure the effects of multimodal physical and cognitive fitness training on sustaining mental health and job readiness via impacts on subjective burnout, mental wellbeing, and resilience in a military cohort. Volunteer participants were block randomised into either a standard 4-week resilient mind program (RMP) intervention or an RMP combined with self-paced functional imagery practice (RMP+FI). Self-reported burnout, mental wellbeing, and resilience were measured at baseline and at the end of the 4-week intervention using the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS), Brief Resilience Scale (BRS), and the World Health Organization’s WHO-5 Well-Being Index (WHO-5), respectively. A total of 78 participants were enrolled in the study and 72 (92%) completed the program. Repeated measures ANOVAs showed significant effects of the RMP intervention, with both the RMP and RMP+FI groups reporting improved resilience (F(1, 70) = 13.08, p < 0.001, partial ω2 = 0.00086) and mental wellbeing (F(1, 70) = 41.86, p < 0.001, partial ω2 = 0.36). Both groups also reported improved burnout markers for professional efficacy (F(1, 70) = 6.25, p < 0.002, partial ω2 = 0.02), as well as reduced emotional exhaustion (F(1, 70) = 31.84, p < 0.001, partial ω2 = 0.02) and job cynicism (F(1, 70) = 8.80, p < 0.005, partial ω2 = 0.005). The FI practice produced no significant improvement in the RMP-only condition. Our results support the efficacy of RMP intervention in reducing burnout symptoms and improving self-reported mental wellbeing and resilience in a cohort of serving Navy aviators. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Healthy Habits for Sustainable Well-Being)
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