Development and Applications of Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry in Food Analysis

A special issue of Separations (ISSN 2297-8739). This special issue belongs to the section "Analysis of Food and Beverages".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 3341

Special Issue Editors

Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain
Interests: phenolic compounds; circular economy; cosmetics; encapsulation; bioactive properties; by-products
Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Granada, Avda Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada, Spain
Interests: bioactive compounds; phenolic compounds; green extraction techniques; microencapsulation; mass spectrometry; metabolomics
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, advances in analytical methodologies in the field of food analysis have experienced continuous growth. These achievements are especially significant in the coupling of liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The high variety of food constituents together with the diverse nature of food matrices means that this research topic is of great interest and still under investigation. Moreover, novel extraction procedures and instrumentation have allowed delving into minor food constituents and metabolites with interesting applications.

For this reason, this Special Issue of Separations focused on the development and applications of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in food analysis will provide an overview of the current status and future perspectives of the status of this powerful analytical platform in the field of food analysis.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Analytical methodologies for food analysis: HPLC, UHPLC, nano-HPLC, mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS).
  • LC-MS analysis of chemicals present in food: lipids, carbohydrates, glycoproteins, vitamins, flavonoids, mycotoxins, pesticides, allergens, food additives, etc.
  • LC-MS analysis of different food matrices: vegetables, fruits, dairy products, cereals, olive oil, wines, etc.
  • LC-MS analysis for food authentication and adulteration.

This Special Issue titled “Development and Applications of Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry in Food Analysis” will include a selection of recent research and current review articles about novel analytical methodology advances regarding food analysis with LC-MS. This Special Issue is particularly focused on articles describing the advances and optimization of LC-MS analysis for food components.

Prof. Dr. Antonio Segura-Carretero
Dr. Isabel Borrás-Linares
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Separations is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • HPLC
  • UHPLC
  • nano-HPLC
  • mass spectrometry
  • method development
  • LC-MS instrumentation
  • food analysis
  • food authentication
  • food adulteration

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

10 pages, 1185 KiB  
Article
An Improved Analytical Approach Based on µ-QuEChERS Combined with LC-ESI/MS for Monitoring the Occurrence and Levels of Patulin in Commercial Apple Juices
Separations 2023, 10(3), 149; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations10030149 - 23 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1089
Abstract
Patulin (PAT) is a mycotoxin produced in fruits, especially in apples, by diverse fungal species that can be transferred into industrial apple juice during processing. An accurate, effective, and selective method has been validated for the quantification of PAT in different commercial apple [...] Read more.
Patulin (PAT) is a mycotoxin produced in fruits, especially in apples, by diverse fungal species that can be transferred into industrial apple juice during processing. An accurate, effective, and selective method has been validated for the quantification of PAT in different commercial apple juices by combining a modified µ-QuEChERS procedure with high-pressure liquid chromatography (LC) equipped with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (QqQMS). This sample extraction procedure reduced interference from the sugar-rich matrix, and the separation was performed using the C18 Atlantis T3 column within 10 min. PAT was found by MS with electrospray negative ionization (ESI) in the mode of multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The correlation coefficient (R2 = 0.999) satisfied the prerequisite of linearity for PAT in the concentration range of 2–50 μg/kg. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) of PAT were 0.32 and 1.15 μg/kg, respectively, which were compliant with the maximum levels settled in Commission Regulation (EC) No. 1881/2006. The recoveries were within the 92–103% range, at three fortified levels of 2, 20 and 50 μg/kg, with relative standard deviations lower than 7%. Based on analytical validation, it was confirmed that the µ-QuEChERS/HPLC-MS/MS method is an enhanced, reliable, and quick approach for determination of PAT in apple juice. The current approach proposes reduced sample preparation and analysis time. In addition, it is economical, environmentally friendly, and simpler to implement in comparison to traditional approaches. Full article
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13 pages, 2016 KiB  
Article
Chemical Fingerprinting Profile and Targeted Quantitative Analysis of Phenolic Compounds from Rooibos Tea (Aspalathus linearis) and Dietary Supplements Using UHPLC-PDA-MS
Separations 2022, 9(7), 159; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations9070159 - 23 Jun 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1779
Abstract
Aspalathus linearis (Burm.f.) R. Dahlgren, commonly known as rooibos tea, was consumed traditionally by the indigenous South African inhabitants as an herbal remedy. Beside antioxidant properties, it displays antiallergic, antispasmodic, and hypoglycemic activities. An ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography method coupled with photodiode array and [...] Read more.
Aspalathus linearis (Burm.f.) R. Dahlgren, commonly known as rooibos tea, was consumed traditionally by the indigenous South African inhabitants as an herbal remedy. Beside antioxidant properties, it displays antiallergic, antispasmodic, and hypoglycemic activities. An ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography method coupled with photodiode array and mass spectrometry detectors were developed for the determination of 14 phenolic constituents from leaves and stems of A. linearis. The efficient separation was performed within 30 min at a temperature of 30 °C by using C-18 column as the stationary phase and water/acetonitrile with 0.05% formic acid as the mobile phase. Method validation for linearity, repeatability, limits of detection, and limits of quantification was achieved. The limits of detection from 0.2–1 μg/mL were reported for the standard compounds. Their total content varied substantially (1.50–9.85 mg/100 mg sample) in 21 dietary supplements. The presence of regioisomers and diastereomers which co-elute on a variety of stationary phases make separation for quantification purposes challenging. This method was found to be efficient in providing low retention times and excellent resolution for this type of phytochemicals. The established method is suitable for chemical fingerprint analysis of A. linearis and cost-effective for quality control of rooibos tea products. Full article
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