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Frequency Mixing Magnetic Detection of Magnetic Nanoparticles

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 5734

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Forschungszentrum Jülich, IBI-3, 52425 Jülich, Germany
Interests: magnetic field sensors; SQUID; low field NMR

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Medical Engineering and Applied Mathematics, FH Aachen University of Applied Sciences, 52428 Jülich, Germany
Interests: magnetic nanoparticles; micromagnetic simulations; hyperthermia

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Frequency mixing magnetic detection (FMMD) has been well-established for more than 15 years as a sensitive and very selective technique to quantitatively probe magnetic nanoparticles by their nonlinear responses to a two-frequency magnetic excitation field. The method has been applied for numerous magnetic immunoassays of different biological targets, such as viruses, proteins, bacteria, toxins and cells, with better sensitivities and detection ranges than the standard enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA) techniques. In this Special Issue; the fundamentals of FMMD methodology will be comprehensively explained, the design and realization of FMMD instrumentation will be presented; and various FMMD applications from the fields of biomedicine, nanomaterials characterization and even the non-destructive evaluation of fatigue will be highlighted. In particular it will present how offset field scanning is employed to determine the core size distribution of magnetic particles; a phase evaluation allows for the assessment of the Brownian relaxation, yielding information on the binding state of magnetic particles to biological targets; FMMD has been applied as a detection modality for magnetic particle imaging (MPI).

Prof. Dr. Hans-Joachim Krause
Prof. Dr. Ulrich Engelmann
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • frequency mixing magnetic detection (FMMD)
  • magnetic particles
  • magnetic detection
  • magnetic immunoassay (MIA)
  • immunomagnetic reduction (IMR)
  • nonlinear AC susceptometry (NL-ACS)
  • magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS)
  • magnetic particle imaging (MPI)
  • magnetic relaxation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 2033 KiB  
Article
Frequency Mixing Magnetic Detection Setup Employing Permanent Ring Magnets as a Static Offset Field Source
by Ali Mohammad Pourshahidi, Stefan Achtsnicht, Andreas Offenhäusser and Hans-Joachim Krause
Sensors 2022, 22(22), 8776; https://doi.org/10.3390/s22228776 - 14 Nov 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2417
Abstract
Frequency mixing magnetic detection (FMMD) has been explored for its applications in fields of magnetic biosensing, multiplex detection of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) and the determination of core size distribution of MNP samples. Such applications rely on the application of a static offset magnetic [...] Read more.
Frequency mixing magnetic detection (FMMD) has been explored for its applications in fields of magnetic biosensing, multiplex detection of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) and the determination of core size distribution of MNP samples. Such applications rely on the application of a static offset magnetic field, which is generated traditionally with an electromagnet. Such a setup requires a current source, as well as passive or active cooling strategies, which directly sets a limitation based on the portability aspect that is desired for point of care (POC) monitoring applications. In this work, a measurement head is introduced that involves the utilization of two ring-shaped permanent magnets to generate a static offset magnetic field. A steel cylinder in the ring bores homogenizes the field. By variation of the distance between the ring magnets and of the thickness of the steel cylinder, the magnitude of the magnetic field at the sample position can be adjusted. Furthermore, the measurement setup is compared to the electromagnet offset module based on measured signals and temperature behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frequency Mixing Magnetic Detection of Magnetic Nanoparticles)
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Review

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26 pages, 3772 KiB  
Review
Magnetic Particle Spectroscopy for Point-of-Care: A Review on Recent Advances
by Parsa Yari, Bahareh Rezaei, Clifton Dey, Vinit Kumar Chugh, Naga Venkata Ravi Kumar Veerla, Jian-Ping Wang and Kai Wu
Sensors 2023, 23(9), 4411; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23094411 - 30 Apr 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2179
Abstract
Since its first report in 2006, magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS)-based biosensors have flourished over the past decade. Currently, MPS are used for a wide range of applications, such as disease diagnosis, foodborne pathogen detection, etc. In this work, different MPS platforms, such as [...] Read more.
Since its first report in 2006, magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS)-based biosensors have flourished over the past decade. Currently, MPS are used for a wide range of applications, such as disease diagnosis, foodborne pathogen detection, etc. In this work, different MPS platforms, such as dual-frequency and mono-frequency driving field designs, were reviewed. MPS combined with multi-functional magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been extensively reported as a versatile platform for the detection of a long list of biomarkers. The surface-functionalized MNPs serve as nanoprobes that specifically bind and label target analytes from liquid samples. Herein, an analysis of the theories and mechanisms that underlie different MPS platforms, which enable the implementation of bioassays based on either volume or surface, was carried out. Furthermore, this review draws attention to some significant MPS platform applications in the biomedical and biological fields. In recent years, different kinds of MPS point-of-care (POC) devices have been reported independently by several groups in the world. Due to the high detection sensitivity, simple assay procedures and low cost per run, the MPS POC devices are expected to become more widespread in the future. In addition, the growth of telemedicine and remote monitoring has created a greater demand for POC devices, as patients are able to receive health assessments and obtain results from the comfort of their own homes. At the end of this review, we comment on the opportunities and challenges for POC devices as well as MPS devices regarding the intensely growing demand for rapid, affordable, high-sensitivity and user-friendly devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frequency Mixing Magnetic Detection of Magnetic Nanoparticles)
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