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Harsh Environment Special Sensors: From Materials to Electrical Readout

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Intelligent Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020) | Viewed by 3863

Special Issue Editor

Department of Applied Electronics, Politehnica University of Bucharest, 061071 Bucharest, Romania
Interests: low-power electronics; power convertors; CMOS digital integrated circuits; CMOS memory circuits

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The development of advanced sensors and actuators capable of operating in harsh environmental conditions, which include but are not limited to high temperatures, high radiation, high shock, and chemically corrosive environments, has experienced significant expansion in recent years. There is an abundance of applications (combustion optimization and emission control in automotives; geothermal, oil and gas exploration; industrial gas turbines and furnaces; nuclear industry; carbon capture and sequestration; smart infrastructures; space exploration; etc.) which would benefit from the deployment of sensors able to operate in harsh environment conditions. The merits of these advanced sensors include integration into smart structures and components, improved robustness, enriched functionality, enhanced intelligence, and unprecedented performance.

In the last decade, both industry and academia have put a lot of effort into the development of new materials that are able to overcome the limitations in silicon-based microelectronics and nanoelectronics, especially at temperatures above 150°C.

Silicon-on-insulator devices, although not too different from bulk silicon-based sensors, from a chemical and mechanical perspective, provide extended working temperature ranges (up to 300 °C) and radiation hardness. Silicon carbide (SiC), gallium nitride (GaN), aluminium nitride (AlN), and diamond are certainly also extremely attractive in terms of intrinsic properties.

This new Special Issue on Harsh Environment Special Sensors: From Materials to Electrical Readout invites researchers to contribute with reviews and original articles that delve into further performance improvements of advanced sensors for severe conditions. Particular focus is placed on smart parts (innovative sensors, smart interfaces, and readout circuits) to address the monitoring needs within extreme environment conditions, such as high temperature, high pressure, corrosive/erosive atmosphere, and large strain/stress.

Practical sensor monitoring probes usually consist of a sensing element and processing circuitry, packaged in a metal or ceramic casing. Dedicated read-out circuits convert the sensor output signal to industrial standard requirements. Automation of the read-out calibration process, lowering probe power consummation, and improving sensitivity are also key contributions, suitable for the Special Issue. Both experimental and theoretical/simulated results will be taken into account.

Prof. Gheorghe Brezeanu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Harsh environment
  • Wide band gap semiconductors (SiC,GaN,AlN,etc)
  • Emerging materials for sensors
  • High temperature sensors
  • Gas, pressure, blast, tubidity sensors
  • Sensors for automotive and other industrial applications
  • Biosensors, optical sensors
  • Hearth monitoring
  • Readout circuits
  • Performance, optimization

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

15 pages, 5271 KiB  
Article
60–700 K CTAT and PTAT Temperature Sensors with 4H-SiC Schottky Diodes
Sensors 2021, 21(3), 942; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21030942 - 31 Jan 2021
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3246
Abstract
A SiC Schottky dual-diode temperature-sensing element, suitable for both complementary variation of VF with absolute temperature (CTAT) and differential proportional to absolute temperature (PTAT) sensors, is demonstrated over 60–700 K, currently the widest range reported. The structure’s layout places the two identical [...] Read more.
A SiC Schottky dual-diode temperature-sensing element, suitable for both complementary variation of VF with absolute temperature (CTAT) and differential proportional to absolute temperature (PTAT) sensors, is demonstrated over 60–700 K, currently the widest range reported. The structure’s layout places the two identical diodes in close, symmetrical proximity. A stable and high-barrier Schottky contact based on Ni, annealed at 750 °C, is used. XRD analysis evinced the even distribution of Ni2Si over the entire Schottky contact area. Forward measurements in the 60–700 K range indicate nearly identical characteristics for the dual-diodes, with only minor inhomogeneity. Our parallel diode (p-diode) model is used to parameterize experimental curves and evaluate sensing performances over this far-reaching domain. High sensitivity, upwards of 2.32 mV/K, is obtained, with satisfactory linearity (R2 reaching 99.80%) for the CTAT sensor, even down to 60 K. The PTAT differential version boasts increased linearity, up to 99.95%. The lower sensitivity is, in this case, compensated by using a high-performing, low-cost readout circuit, leading to a peak 14.91 mV/K, without influencing linearity. Full article
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