Safe Mobility of Rail Vehicles

A special issue of Safety (ISSN 2313-576X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2017) | Viewed by 10142

Special Issue Editor

Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, School of Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 96 Frelinghuysen Road, Room 607, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA
Interests: railway safety and risk management; infrastructure asset management; transportation data analytics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Railway transportation plays a critical role in safely and efficiently transporting cargo and passengers. Safety is the lifeline and top priority for any type of rail system. In recognition of rising global attention to continued railway safety improvement, this Special Issue, “Safe Mobility of Rail Vehicles”, aims to solicit timely, original, high-quality, peer-reviewed papers that collectively provide a portfolio of recent innovations in railway safety and risk management. All types of rail systems will be considered. Potential topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Track infrastructure
  • Rolling stock
  • Train control and signaling
  • Condition monitoring
  • Human factors
  • Highway-rail grade crossing issues
  • Hazardous materials
  • Data analytics
  • Operations research

The submitted paper must present original research that has not been published elsewhere. The paper should clearly state its unique contribution to the literature and practice regarding railway safety.

Assist. Prof. Dr. Xiang Liu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Safety is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Railway
  • safety
  • risk
  • infrastructure
  • equipment
  • train control
  • human factors
  • data analytics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 3117 KiB  
Article
A Weibull Approach for Enabling Safety-Oriented Decision-Making for Electronic Railway Signaling Systems
Safety 2018, 4(2), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/safety4020017 - 16 Apr 2018
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 5443
Abstract
This paper presents the advantages of using Weibull distributions, within the context of railway signaling systems, for enabling safety-oriented decision-making. Failure rates are used to statistically model the basic event of fault-tree analysis, and their value sizes the maximum allowable latency of failures [...] Read more.
This paper presents the advantages of using Weibull distributions, within the context of railway signaling systems, for enabling safety-oriented decision-making. Failure rates are used to statistically model the basic event of fault-tree analysis, and their value sizes the maximum allowable latency of failures to fulfill the safety target for which the system has been designed. Relying on field-return failure data, Weibull parameters have been calculated for an existing electronic signaling system and a comparison with existing predictive reliability data, based on exponential distribution, is provided. Results are discussed in order to drive considerations on the respect of quantitative targets and on the impact that a wrong hypothesis might have on the choice of a given architecture. Despite the huge amount of information gathered through the after-sales logbook used to build reliability distribution, several key elements for reliable estimation of failure rate values are still missing. This might affect the uncertainty of reliability parameters and the effort required to collect all the information. We then present how to intervene when operational failure rates present higher values compared to the theoretical approach: increasing the redundancies of the system or performing preventive maintenance tasks. Possible consequences of unjustified adoption of constant failure rate are presented. Some recommendations are also shared in order to build reliability-oriented logbooks and avoid data censoring phenomena by enhancing the functions of the electronic boards composing the system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Safe Mobility of Rail Vehicles)
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169 KiB  
Article
Analysis of Passenger Incident Data from Five Rail Transit Systems
Safety 2017, 3(3), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/safety3030021 - 12 Sep 2017
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 4375
Abstract
The study results reported here are part of a larger research project that developed a manual for practitioners to improve safety at rail transit platform/train and platform/guideway interfaces. As part of that effort, passenger injury incident data was collected from five rail transit [...] Read more.
The study results reported here are part of a larger research project that developed a manual for practitioners to improve safety at rail transit platform/train and platform/guideway interfaces. As part of that effort, passenger injury incident data was collected from five rail transit systems, and interviews were conducted with safety officers at other rail transit systems in the US and Canada. The data collected showed that stairs and escalators and general platform tripping produced more injury incidents than the platform/train and platform/guideway interfaces. Heavy rail transit with platforms that are higher than 24 inches from top of rail had more injury incidents than light rail transit that typically operates on low level platforms. Other causes of injury incidents included intoxication, attempted suicide, and distraction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Safe Mobility of Rail Vehicles)
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