Safety—Practitioners' Perspectives

A special issue of Safety (ISSN 2313-576X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 April 2022) | Viewed by 5240
Submit your paper and select the Journal “Safety” and the Special Issue “Safety—Practitioners' Perspectives” via: https://susy.mdpi.com/user/manuscripts/upload/dceed4dddcd5d4c41f85ee01f2a34029?journal=safety. Please contact the guest editor or the journal editor (tiffany.lv@mdpi.com) for any queries.

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Machine Design, School of Industrial Engineering and Management, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 10044 Stockholm, Sweden
Interests: system safety; system/software engineering; empirical software engineering; engineering education
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Gothenburg, 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden
Interests: software engineering; software metrics (key performance indicators); software engineering standardization (e.g., ISO/IEC 15939, ISO/IEC 25xxx); software design (e.g., modelling, meta-modelling, UML, SysML); self-adaptive software systems; software technology (e.g. performance technology); safety systems (ISO 26262)

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 114 28 Stockholm, Sweden
Interests: safety management in safety critical operations; sociotechnical system analysis and design at work and organisational level; safety management training and engineering education for safe and sustainable systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Contemporary engineering is building ever more complex systems, especially through the integration of cyber and physical parts into cyber-physical systems (CPS) in domains such as transportation, manufacturing, healthcare, and power generation. New hazards and increased risks of CPS during operations are known and under the intense scrutiny of researchers. However, this research is seldom actively related to the engineering organisations that ensure that the design of said CPS is suitable for safe operations. This is problematic, as:

  • Researchers might overlook important parts of engineering practice that influence the efficiency of the methods they propose for ensuring safety.
  • Engineers might be unaware of new methods for ensuring safety or find it difficult to apply them.
  • Managers in engineering organisations might be unaware of their role in safety when organising work (including implementing practice and methods).

This Special Issue invites papers that bridge this gap between research and engineering practice, for instance, (empirical) studies:

  • Of engineering organisations and practice as related to the safe engineering of CPS.
  • Relating novel methods for ensuring safety to CPS engineering processes or standards.
  • Clarifying limitations on safety practice brought on by the sociotechnical context of engineers producing CPS.
  • Safety management (assurance) in engineering organisations.

Keywords

  • Safety practice
  • Safety engineering practice
  • Engineering safety practice
  • Safety management
  • Cyber-physical systems

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

26 pages, 733 KiB  
Article
Engineer-Centred Design Factors and Methodological Approach for Maritime Autonomy Emergency Response Systems
by Fredrik Asplund and Pernilla Ulfvengren
Safety 2022, 8(3), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/safety8030054 - 29 Jul 2022
Viewed by 2395
Abstract
Commercial deployment of maritime autonomous surface ships (MASSs) is close to becoming a reality. Although MASSs are fully autonomous, the industry will still allow remote operations centre (ROC) operators to intervene if a MASS is facing an emergency the MASS cannot handle by [...] Read more.
Commercial deployment of maritime autonomous surface ships (MASSs) is close to becoming a reality. Although MASSs are fully autonomous, the industry will still allow remote operations centre (ROC) operators to intervene if a MASS is facing an emergency the MASS cannot handle by itself. A human-centred design for the associated emergency response systems will require attention to the ROC operator workplace, but also, arguably, to the behaviour-shaping constraints on the engineers building these systems. There is thus a need for an engineer-centred design of engineering organisations, influenced by the current discourse on human factors. To contribute to the discourse, think-aloud protocol interviewing was conducted with well-informed maritime operators to elicit fundamental demands on cognition and collaboration by maritime autonomy emergency response systems. Based on the results, inferences were made regarding both design factors and methodological choices for future, early phase engineering of emergency response systems. Firstly, engineering firms have to improve their informal gathering and sharing of information through gatekeepers and/or organisational liaisons. To avoid a too cautious approach to accountability, this will have to include a closer integration of development and operations. Secondly, associated studies taking the typical approach of exposing relevant operators to new design concepts in scripted scenarios should include significant flexibility and less focus on realism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Safety—Practitioners' Perspectives)
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