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Advances in Remote Sensing of the Inland and Coastal Water Zones II

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 July 2024 | Viewed by 6520

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Geoinformatics, Maritime University of Szczecin, 70-500 Szczecin, Poland
Interests: image processing; shoreline extraction; spatial analyses; digital terrain modeling; sea bottom modeling; big data set reduction; neural networks
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Marine and Environmental Sciences, University of Szczecin, 70-500 Szczecin, Poland
Interests: terrestrial laser scanner; remote sensing modeling of coastal environment; shoreline erosion; coastal geomorphology; coastal hazards; flood risk
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Oceanography, University of Gdańsk, 80-309 Gdańsk, Poland
Interests: physical oceanography; satellite remote sensing; sea color; sea surface temperature; object based image analysis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Navigation, Maritime University of Szczecin, Waly Chrobrego 1-2, 70-500 Szczecin, Poland
Interests: spatial big data; spatial analysis; artificial neural networks; deep learning; data fusion; processing of bathymetric data; sea bottom modeling; data reduction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Contact areas between water and land are an important element of the environment that is constantly changing. It is related to the influence of marine and inland water masses on land and the influence of various anthropogenic factors. One of the effects of the impact may be coastal erosion, changes in the coastline, the occurrence of floods, algal blooms, pollution or changes in the functioning of ecosystems. The balanced coexistence of these two environments requires constant monitoring. Taking into account the extent of inland and coastal water areas, such monitoring can be carried out with the use of remote sensing sensors on a scale covering local analyses or covering larger sections of banks, rivers or water reservoirs. More and more detailed and diversified remote sensing data of the aquatic environment and adjacent areas make it possible to conduct comprehensive studies, which is often related to their increasing resolution, completeness, availability or development of measuring instruments.

The previous Special Issue ‘Advances in Remote Sensing of the Inland and Coastal Water Zones’ was a great success. We dedicate a special edition to publications related to research on the environment of coastal and inland coastal zones, undertaking comprehensive and up-to-date solutions to scientific problems. Research may also be related to new applications of remote sensing data, the development of new methods of their processing including machine learning, geospatial modelling or the assimilation of remote sensing data in forecasting models. Taking into account the constant development of remote sensing, satellite, hydrographic and other mobile sensors, in this Special Issue, we wanted to focus on their use in various environmental aspects. Research may include, among others, the detection of changes taking place in coastal zones, the analysis of water parameters, processing of data, the creation of digital terrain and bathymetric models, ecosystem analysis and other thematically related topics.

Dr. Jacek Lubczonek
Dr. Paweł Terefenko
Dr. Katarzyna Bradtke
Dr. Marta Wlodarczyk-Sielicka
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • coastal zone
  • coastal geomorphology
  • inland waters
  • shoreline change/erosion
  • ecosystem
  • water parameters
  • water level
  • bathymetry
  • topo-bathymetry
  • geodata processing
  • data fusion
  • LIDAR
  • spatial big data
  • satellite remote sensing
  • algal blooms
  • 3D modelling
  • spatial mapping
  • image processing and analysis
  • machine learning
  • digital elevation/bathymetric models

Published Papers (5 papers)

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19 pages, 5129 KiB  
Article
Annual and Interannual Variability in the Diffuse Attenuation Coefficient and Turbidity in Urbanized Washington Lake from 2013 to 2022 Assessed Using Landsat-8/9
by Jennifer A. Schulien, Tessa Code, Curtis DeGasperi, David A. Beauchamp, Arielle Tonus Ellis and Arni H. Litt
Remote Sens. 2023, 15(20), 5055; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs15205055 - 21 Oct 2023
Viewed by 941
Abstract
Water clarity, defined in this study using measurements of the downwelling diffuse light attenuation coefficient (Kd) and turbidity, is an important indicator of lake trophic status and ecosystem health. We used in-situ measurements to evaluate existing semi-analytical models for Kd [...] Read more.
Water clarity, defined in this study using measurements of the downwelling diffuse light attenuation coefficient (Kd) and turbidity, is an important indicator of lake trophic status and ecosystem health. We used in-situ measurements to evaluate existing semi-analytical models for Kd and turbidity, developed a regional turbidity model based on spectral shape, and evaluated the spatial and temporal trends in Lake Washington from 2013 to 2022 using Landsat-8/9 Operational Land Imager (OLI). We found no significant trends from 2013 to 2022 in Kd or turbidity when both the annual and full datasets were considered. In addition to the spring peak lasting from April through June, autumn Kd peaks were present at all sites, a pattern consistent with seasonal chlorophyll a and zooplankton concentrations. There existed no autumn peak in the monthly turbidity dataset, and the spring peak occurred two months before the Kd peak, nearly mirroring seasonal variability in the Cedar River discharge rates over the same period. The Kd and turbidity algorithms were thus each more sensitive to different sources of water clarity variability in Lake Washington. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Remote Sensing of the Inland and Coastal Water Zones II)
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25 pages, 34037 KiB  
Article
Application of Filtering Techniques to Smooth a Surface of Hybrid Digital Bathymetric Model
by Jacek Lubczonek and Grzegorz Zaniewicz
Remote Sens. 2023, 15(19), 4737; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs15194737 - 27 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 949
Abstract
The aim of the research is to identify the optimal method for smoothing the surface of a hybrid digital bathymetric model (HDBM). The initiation of this research is justified by the fact that a model created from diverse types of data may have [...] Read more.
The aim of the research is to identify the optimal method for smoothing the surface of a hybrid digital bathymetric model (HDBM). The initiation of this research is justified by the fact that a model created from diverse types of data may have different surface textures and outliers. This diversity may cause problems in subsequent data processing stages, such as generating depth contours. As part of the adopted research methodology, fifteen filters were analysed. Filtering techniques were examined for filter type, the number of iterations, weights, and window size. The result is the adopted research methodology, which enabled the selection of the optimal filtering method. The research undertaken in this work is an extension of the methodology for developing an HDBM. An important aspect of the research is the approach to elaborating on such kinds of models in shallow and ultra-shallow waters adjacent to the land, as well as the use of data obtained by modern measurement platforms, such as unmanned surface vehicles (USV) and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). The studies fit into the general context of works related to the development of this type of model and undoubtedly provide a solid reference for further development or improvement of similar methods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Remote Sensing of the Inland and Coastal Water Zones II)
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20 pages, 5952 KiB  
Article
Introducing ICEDAP: An ‘Iterative Coastal Embayment Delineation and Analysis Process’ with Applications for the Management of Coastal Change
by Nicholas B. Wellbrock, Nathalie W. Jung, David P. Retchless, Timothy M. Dellapenna and Victoria L. Salgado
Remote Sens. 2023, 15(16), 4034; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs15164034 - 15 Aug 2023
Viewed by 901
Abstract
Coastal embayments provide vital benefits to both nature and humans alike in the form of ecosystem services, access to waterways, and general aesthetic appeal. These coastal interfaces are therefore often subject to human development and modifications, with estuarine embayments especially likely to have [...] Read more.
Coastal embayments provide vital benefits to both nature and humans alike in the form of ecosystem services, access to waterways, and general aesthetic appeal. These coastal interfaces are therefore often subject to human development and modifications, with estuarine embayments especially likely to have been anthropogenically altered. Frequent alterations include damming to eliminate tidal influx, backfilling to create new land, and development for the sake of economic gain, which may cause profound damage to local habitats. By providing a record of transitions in surface waters over time, satellite imagery is essential to monitoring these coastal changes, especially on regional to global scales. However, prior work has not provided a straightforward way to use these satellite-derived datasets to specifically delineate embayed waters, limiting researchers’ ability to focus their analyses on this ecologically and economically important subset of coastal waters. Here, we created ICEDAP, a geometry-based ArcGIS toolbox to automatically delineate coastal embayments and quantify coastal surface water change. We then applied ICEDAP to the coast of South Korea, and found that coastal habitat change was particularly profound within embayed regions identified using an 8 km epsilon convexity setting (denoting a moderate distance from the coast and degree of enclosure by surrounding land areas). In the mapped coastal embayments, more than 1400 km2 of coastal habitats were lost during the past 38 years, primarily due to human modification such as large-scale land reclamation projects and the construction of impoundments. Our results suggest that anthropogenic alterations have resulted in the widespread loss of more than USD 70 million of valuable coastal ecosystem services. Together, ICEDAP provides a new innovative tool for both coastal scientists and managers to automatically identify hotspots of coastal change over large spatial and temporal scales in an epoch where anthropogenic and climate-driven changes commonly threaten the stability of coastal habitats. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Remote Sensing of the Inland and Coastal Water Zones II)
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17 pages, 26835 KiB  
Technical Note
The Impact of Side-Scan Sonar Resolution and Acoustic Shadow Phenomenon on the Quality of Sonar Imagery and Data Interpretation Capabilities
by Artur Grządziel
Remote Sens. 2023, 15(23), 5599; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs15235599 - 1 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1869
Abstract
Side-scan sonar is designed and used for a variety of survey work, in both military and civilian fields. These systems provide acoustic imageries that play a significant role in a variety of marine and inland applications. For this reason, it is extremely important [...] Read more.
Side-scan sonar is designed and used for a variety of survey work, in both military and civilian fields. These systems provide acoustic imageries that play a significant role in a variety of marine and inland applications. For this reason, it is extremely important that the recorded sonar image is characterized by high resolution, detail and sharpness. This article is mainly aimed at the demonstration of the impact of side-scan sonar resolution on the imaging quality. The article also presents the importance of acoustic shadow in the process of analyzing sonar data and identifying underwater objects. The real measurements were carried out using two independent survey systems: hull-mounted sonar and towed side-scan sonar. Six different shipwrecks lying in the Baltic Sea were selected as the objects of research. The results presented in the article also constitute evidence of how the sonar technology has changed over time. The survey findings show that by maintaining the appropriate operational conditions and meeting several requirements, it is possible to obtain photographic-quality sonar images, which may be crucial in the process of data interpretation and shipwreck identification. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Remote Sensing of the Inland and Coastal Water Zones II)
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17 pages, 13935 KiB  
Technical Note
Technological Advances to Rescue Temporary and Ephemeral Wetlands: Reducing Their Vulnerability, Making Them Visible
by Raquel Jiménez-Melero, Patricio Bohorquez, Inmaculada González-Planet, Francisco José Pérez-Latorre and Gema Parra
Remote Sens. 2023, 15(14), 3553; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs15143553 - 15 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1039
Abstract
Mediterranean temporary ponds are a priority habitat according to the Natura 2000 network of the European Union, and complete inventories of these ecosystems are therefore needed. Their small size, short hydroperiod, or severe disturbance make these ponds undetectable by most remote sensing systems. [...] Read more.
Mediterranean temporary ponds are a priority habitat according to the Natura 2000 network of the European Union, and complete inventories of these ecosystems are therefore needed. Their small size, short hydroperiod, or severe disturbance make these ponds undetectable by most remote sensing systems. Here we show, for the first time, that the distributed hydrologic model IBER+ detects ephemeral and even extinct wetlands by fully exploiting the available digital elevation model and resolving many microtopographic features at drainage basin scales of about 1000 km2. This paper aims to implement a methodology for siting flood-prone areas that can potentially host a temporary wetland, validating the results with historical orthophotos and existing wetlands inventories. Our model succeeds in dryland endorheic catchments of the Upper Guadalquivir Basin: it has detected 89% of the previously catalogued wetlands and found four new unknown wetlands. In addition, we have found that 24% of the detected wetlands have disappeared because of global change. Subsequently, environmental managers could use the proposed methodology to locate wetlands quickly and cheaply. Finding wetlands would help monitor their conservation and restore them if needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Remote Sensing of the Inland and Coastal Water Zones II)
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