remotesensing-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Satellite Remote Sensing of Weather, Water and Climate Couplings and Phenomena (Second Edition)

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Ocean Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 442

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Coastal and Marine Systems Science, Coastal Carolina University, Conway, SC 29526, USA
Interests: observations of and numerical modeling of atmospheric; oceanic, estuary; land and hydraulic inter-actively coupled systems; relationships between climate and weather coupled systems; wind-wave-current coupled interactions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Marine Sciences, UOS Rome, 00133 Rome, Italy
Interests: oceanography; earth observation; physical oceanography; satellite image analysis; ocean currents and circulation; satellite image processing; satellite; water quality; environment; climate change
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Nanjing University of Information and Science, 219 Ningliu Road, Nanjing 210044, China
Interests: satellite oceanography; tropical cyclone remote sensing; atmosphere-ocean interaction; radar constellation sea ice monitoring; marine information intelligent extraction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Marine Technology, Faculty of Information Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China
Interests: ocean remote sensing; convolutional neural network; sea surface temperature; spatial resolution; deep learning; geostationary satellite; high spatial resolution; hurricane; open ocean; satellite images; subsurface temperature; tropical cyclone
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Due to the overwhelming support and interest in the previous Special Issue (SI), we are introducing a 2nd edition regarding “Satellite Remote Sensing of Weather, Water, and Climate Couplings and Phenomena”. I would like to thank all the authors and co-authors who made contributions to the success of the 1st edition of this SI.

Satellite remote sensing presents a robust tool with which to address and unravel coupled weather, water, and climate phenomena at multiple scales. The temporal and spatial scales of atmospheric, oceanic, and hydrologic environmental phenomena span the period range from isolated events, particularly extreme events, to that of sub-seasonal variability in the Earth’s interactively coupled atmospheric, oceanic, and hydrologic systems. There are significant associated implications for human and ecological systems, and these have become an emerging topic around which issues of societal and economic value and sustainability can be examined and used for societal responses and planning. In this issue, remote sensing tools comprehensively address these phenomena because of the incredible spatial synoptic coverage that they provide. When coupled with environmental observational datasets and mathematical modeling outputs, satellite remote sensing couples observed and/or modeled environmental processes with societal impacts. Moreover, satellite data used for numerical model validation are now being assimilated into next-gen numerical modeling strategies, thus advancing event prognostications. Specific topics include coastal renewable energy assessment; storm-induced coastal and inland flooding; flood hazard mapping; atmospheric coastal frontal system detection; African SAL detection; ocean heat content; multi-scale storm phenomena components; atmospheric rivers; and new uncharted uses of different types of remotely sensed imagery for pattern recognition.

Prof. Dr. Len Pietrafesa
Dr. Emanuele Böhm
Prof. Dr. Biao Zhang
Prof. Dr. Qing Xu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • coastal renewable energy assessment
  • storm induced coastal and inland flooding
  • flood hazard mapping
  • atmospheric coastal frontal system detection
  • African SAL detection
  • ocean heat content
  • multi-scale storm phenomena components
  • extreme weather and precipitation
  • atmospheric rivers
  • interaction of ocean, atmosphere and land
  • climate change

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

20 pages, 26003 KiB  
Article
Impact of Satellite Wind on Improving Simulation of the Upper Ocean Response to Tropical Cyclones
by Xinxin Yue and Biao Zhang
Remote Sens. 2024, 16(11), 1832; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs16111832 - 21 May 2024
Viewed by 300
Abstract
Accurate modeling of the ocean response to tropical cyclones (TCs) requires high-quality wind fields to force ocean models. In this study, blended wind fields are generated using multi-source satellite data and the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) wind data. We utilize the hybrid [...] Read more.
Accurate modeling of the ocean response to tropical cyclones (TCs) requires high-quality wind fields to force ocean models. In this study, blended wind fields are generated using multi-source satellite data and the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) wind data. We utilize the hybrid wind fields to drive the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) for simulating oceanic dynamic and thermodynamic parameters. The model’s simulated ocean surface and sub-surface temperatures, as well as current speeds, are generally consistent with satellite and in situ observations collected during TC Winston and Freddy. The results are significantly better than those simulated by ROMS using wind forcing from CFSR alone. These results suggest that incorporating satellite wind data into the atmospheric forcing has the potential to enhance vertical mixing and improve simulations of the upper ocean response to TCs. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop