Advances in Microbial Fermentation Processes II

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Biological Processes and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 18166

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the food sector, fermentation processes have been the object of great interest in regard to enhancing the yield, quality, and safety of final products. Microbial fermentation has traditionally been used to produce foods with prolonged shelf life and enhanced digestibility. The benefits extended to human health by fermented foods are expressed either directly through the interactions of ingested live microorganisms with the host (probiotic effect) or indirectly as the result of the ingestion of microbial metabolites synthesized during fermentation (biogenic effect). Moreover, several beneficial microbes can inhibit the growth of pathogenic/spoilage microorganisms and degrade toxins.

Several novel microbial-based biotechnological solutions have been recorded, and continuous explorations of microbial diversity are being carried out worldwide. In addition, most recently, fermentation has been considered a sustainable approach for maximizing the utilization of bioresources to address the global food crisis. For example, several microbial-based bioconversions have been proposed for the production of enzymes, vitamins, antioxidants, biofuels, feeds, antimicrobial molecules, and other bioactive chemicals, also exploiting agro-industrial wastes.

We encourage the presentation of high-quality contributions (original research articles or review papers) providing innovations in microbial fermentative processes, including improvements of the quality/safety of fermented foods and beverages, the production of high-added-value products, and the valorization/recovery of agro-food wastes.

Dr. Maria Tufariello
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fermented foods
  • fermented beverages
  • bioactive compounds
  • volatile compounds
  • probiotics
  • nutrients
  • food safety
  • food processing
  • biotechnologies
  • agro-food wastes
  • microbial bioproduction

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 951 KiB  
Article
Microbial Communities and Metabolites of Whole Crop Corn Silage Inoculated with Lentilactobacillus plantarum and Lentilactobacillus buchneri
by Qian Guo, Xia Hao, Yuerui Li, Qing Zhang, Chao Wang and Hongyan Han
Processes 2022, 10(11), 2369; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr10112369 - 11 Nov 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 950
Abstract
To investigate the effects of different types of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on aerobic stability, microbial community and metabolites of whole crop corn silage ensiled with Lentilactobacillus plantarum (LP) and Lentilactobacillus buchneri (LB) or not (CK), the fermentation parameters, aerobic stability, microbial community [...] Read more.
To investigate the effects of different types of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on aerobic stability, microbial community and metabolites of whole crop corn silage ensiled with Lentilactobacillus plantarum (LP) and Lentilactobacillus buchneri (LB) or not (CK), the fermentation parameters, aerobic stability, microbial community and metabolite differential components of whole crop corn silage were analyzed after ensiling for 8 months. The results showed that the pH of the whole treatment was lower than 4.2, which indicates good fermentation quality. Compared with the LP group, the LB group significantly improved the aerobic stability of whole crop corn silage (p < 0.05). The addition of LB and LP both increased the number of LAB and the relative abundance of Lentilactobacillus. Metabolite analysis results showed that 28 metabolites were significantly different between the LP and CK groups (p < 0.01), 15 metabolites were significantly different between the LB and CK groups (p < 0.01), and 17 metabolites were significantly different between the LP and LB groups (p < 0.01). The antioxidant metabolites 9-oxo-10(E), 12(E)-octadecadienoic acid and 9(Z),11(E),13(E)-octadecatrienoic acid ethyl ester in the LB group were significantly higher than those in the lp group (p < 0.01). Therefore, compared with LP, obligate heterofermentative LB is more beneficial to maintain the stability of whole crop corn silage after cellar opening. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Microbial Fermentation Processes II)
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Review

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37 pages, 4164 KiB  
Review
Lactic Acid: A Comprehensive Review of Production to Purification
by Abidemi Oluranti Ojo and Olga de Smidt
Processes 2023, 11(3), 688; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11030688 - 24 Feb 2023
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 13692
Abstract
Lactic acid (LA) has broad applications in the food, chemical, pharmaceutical, and cosmetics industries. LA production demand rises due to the increasing demand for polylactic acid since LA is a precursor for polylactic acid production. Fermentative LA production using renewable resources, such as [...] Read more.
Lactic acid (LA) has broad applications in the food, chemical, pharmaceutical, and cosmetics industries. LA production demand rises due to the increasing demand for polylactic acid since LA is a precursor for polylactic acid production. Fermentative LA production using renewable resources, such as lignocellulosic materials, reduces greenhouse gas emissions and offers a cheaper alternative feedstock than refined sugars. Suitable pretreatment methods must be selected to minimize LA cost production, as the successful hydrolysis of lignocellulose results in sugar-rich feedstocks for fermentation. This review broadly focused on fermentative LA production from lignocellulose. Aspects discussed include (i). low-cost materials for fermentative LA production, (ii). pretreatment methods, (iii). enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose, (iv). lactic acid-producing microorganisms, including fungi, bacteria, genetically modified microorganisms, and their fermentative pathways, and (v). fermentation modes and methods. Industrial fermentative lactic acid production and purification, difficulties in using lignocellulose in fermentative LA production, and possible strategies to circumvent the challenges were discussed. A promising option for the industrial production and purification of LA that contains enzyme and cell recycling continuous simultaneous saccharification and fermentation coupled with membrane-based separation was proposed. This proposed system can eliminate substrate-, feedback-, and end-product inhibition, thereby increasing LA concentration, productivity, and yield. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Microbial Fermentation Processes II)
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20 pages, 2487 KiB  
Review
Improved Foods Using Enzymes from Basidiomycetes
by Ralf G. Berger and Franziska Ersoy
Processes 2022, 10(4), 726; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr10040726 - 09 Apr 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2904
Abstract
Within the kingdom of fungi, the division Basidiomycota represents more than 30,000 species, some with huge genomes indicating great metabolic potential. The fruiting bodies of many basidiomycetes are appreciated as food (“mushrooms”). Solid-state and submerged cultivation processes have been established for many species. [...] Read more.
Within the kingdom of fungi, the division Basidiomycota represents more than 30,000 species, some with huge genomes indicating great metabolic potential. The fruiting bodies of many basidiomycetes are appreciated as food (“mushrooms”). Solid-state and submerged cultivation processes have been established for many species. Specifically, xylophilic fungi secrete numerous enzymes but also form smaller metabolites along unique pathways; both groups of compounds may be of interest to the food processing industry. To stimulate further research and not aim at comprehensiveness in the broad field, this review describes some recent progress in fermentation processes and the knowledge of fungal genetics. Processes with potential for food applications based on lipases, esterases, glycosidases, peptidases and oxidoreductases are presented. The formation and degradation of colourants, the degradation of harmful food components, the formation of food ingredients and particularly of volatile and non-volatile flavours serve as examples. In summary, edible basidiomycetes are foods—and catalysts—for food applications and rich donors of genes to construct heterologous cell factories for fermentation processes. Options arise to support the worldwide trend toward greener, more eco-friendly and sustainable processes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Microbial Fermentation Processes II)
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