Recent Advances in Modern Carbon-Negative Technologies for CO2 Capture

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental and Green Processes".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 998

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Semiconductor Engineering, Lunghwa University of Science and Technology, Taoyuan City 33306, Taiwan
Interests: crystallization and precipitation; CCUS; preparation of nanostructured lipid carriers; nanoscience and technology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The world is facing a significant climate crisis, and carbon emissions are a major contributor to it. To mitigate the impact of climate change, it is essential to reduce the amount of carbon emissions from various sources, such as coal-fired power, petroleum, cement production and steel-making plants. This Special Issue “Recent Advances in Modern Carbon-Negative Technologies for CO2 Capture” is a platform that can be used to reduce CO2 emission, focusing on the fundamental chemistry, chemical engineering processes and modern processes, such as absorption, adsorption, capture and utilization and membrane separation; it also includes the development of materials for capture. The technology does not only focus on carbon capture, storage and utilization (CCSU), but also includes the areas of renewable energy, hydrogen and circular economy.

Recently, there has been a number of works showing the effective mitigation and utilization of CO2, including direct air capture (DAC) technologies, enhanced rock weathering (ERW), aqueous amine-based CO2 capture, carbon capture and conversion, cryogenic carbon capture (CCC) and carbon capture using nanotechnology. This Special Issue on “Recent Advances in Modern Carbon-Negative Technologies for CO2 Capture” seeks high-quality works, with topics including, but not limited to:

  • Absorptions with new solvents and performance applications;
  • Membrane separations with higher-performance materials;
  • Adsorptions with high-specific-surface-area materials;
  • Carbon capture and conversion;
  • Renewable energy, hydrogen and circular economy.

Prof. Dr. Pao-Chi Chen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • capture
  • absorption
  • adsorption
  • renewable energy
  • circular economy

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 1868 KiB  
Article
Electrolytic Regeneration of Spent Caustic Soda from CO2 Capture Systems
by Hossein Mohammadpour, Almantas Pivrikas, Ka Yu Cheng and Goen Ho
Processes 2024, 12(4), 723; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr12040723 - 2 Apr 2024
Viewed by 605
Abstract
The traditional electrochemical caustic soda recovery system uses the generated pH gradient across the ion exchange membrane for the regeneration of spent alkaline absorbent from CO2 capture. This electrochemical CO2 capture system releases the by-products H2 and O2 at [...] Read more.
The traditional electrochemical caustic soda recovery system uses the generated pH gradient across the ion exchange membrane for the regeneration of spent alkaline absorbent from CO2 capture. This electrochemical CO2 capture system releases the by-products H2 and O2 at the cathode and anode, respectively. Although effective for capturing CO2, the slow kinetics of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) limit the energy efficiency of this technique. Hence, this study proposed and validated a hybrid electrochemical cell based on the H2-cycling from the cathode to the anode to eliminate the reliance on anodic oxygen generation. The results show that our lab-scale prototype enabled effective spent caustic soda recovery with an electron utilisation efficiency of 90%, and a relative carbonate/bicarbonate diffusional flux of approximately 40%. The system also enabled the regeneration of spent alkaline absorbent with a minimum electrochemical energy input of 0.19 kWh/kg CO2 at a CO2 recovery rate of 0.7 mol/m2/h, accounting for 30% lower energy demand than a control system without H2-recycling, making this technique a promising alternative to the conventional thermal regeneration technology. Full article
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