Clever Microorganisms in Biotechnology: From Wastes to High-Value Biopolymers

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomacromolecules, Biobased and Biodegradable Polymers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 1967

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Microbiology and Mycology, Faculty of Biology and Biotechnology, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, 10719 Olsztyn, Poland
Interests: biopolymers; antimicrobial agents; microbial fermentation; metabolic engineering; synthetic biology
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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering,Yeungnam Univesity, Gyeongsan, Republic of Korea
Interests: polyhydroxyalkanoate; astaxanthin; biofuels; microbiology; biofilm
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The effects of petrochemical-derived plastics on the global environment and the need for new polymers with unique properties have paved the way for developing novel technologies for the production of a wide range of biopolymers. Biopolymers, such as bacterial cellulose, exopolysaccharides, polyhydroxyalkanoates, dextran and alginates, are bioproducts utilized in industrial applications. There is a growing interest in producing bioproducts from renewable resources using microorganisms. Such substrates could be waste materials that create problems in waste management and water pollution. Many microbes have become  efficient cell factories for biopolymer production due to their metabolic versatility and a remarkable tolerance to a wide range of carbon sources. This Special Issue intends to cover the latest developments in the microbial synthesis of biopolymers using waste streams. 

Topics may include  (but are not limited to):

  • The utilization of wastes for biopolymer production by pure, recombinant and mixed microbial cultures; 
  • New approaches to the sustainable production of biopolymers; 
  • Novel microbes as biopolymers producers; 
  • Novel biopolymers’ characterization and their applications.

Prof. Dr. Justyna Możejko-Ciesielska
Dr. Prasun Kumar
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pure/mixed cultures
  • metabolic engineering
  • wastes
  • bacterial cellulose
  • exopolysaccharides
  • dextran
  • alginates
  • biopolymers

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

19 pages, 1829 KiB  
Review
Recent Challenges and Trends of Polyhydroxyalkanoate Production by Extremophilic Bacteria Using Renewable Feedstocks
by Justyna Możejko-Ciesielska, Subhasree Ray and Shivangi Sankhyan
Polymers 2023, 15(22), 4385; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15224385 - 11 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1556
Abstract
Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biodegradable polymers with immense potential in addressing the global plastic pollution crisis and advancing sustainable bioplastics production. Among the various microbes known for PHA production, extremophilic bacteria possess unique capabilities to thrive under extreme conditions, making them attractive candidates for [...] Read more.
Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biodegradable polymers with immense potential in addressing the global plastic pollution crisis and advancing sustainable bioplastics production. Among the various microbes known for PHA production, extremophilic bacteria possess unique capabilities to thrive under extreme conditions, making them attractive candidates for PHA synthesis. Furthermore, the utilization of renewable feedstocks for PHA production aligns with the growing demand for sustainable bioplastic alternatives. A diverse range of extremophilic bacteria, especially halophiles and thermophiles, has provided cost-competitive platforms for producing customized PHA polymers. Extremophilic bacteria offer unique advantages over mesophiles due to their contamination resistance, high cell density growth, and unique culture conditions. The current status of Halomonas spp. as a chassis further allows exploration of metabolic engineering approaches to overcome the challenges associated with current industrial biotechnology. This article especially focuses on extremophilic bacteria and explores recent advances in utilizing renewable feedstocks such as lignocellulosic biomass, agro-industrial residues, and waste streams for PHA production. The integration of biorefinery concepts and circular economy principles in PHA manufacturing is also examined. This review is an attempt to provide an understanding of renewable substrates as feedstocks and emerging trends in PHA production by extremophilic bacteria. It underscores the pivotal role of extremophiles and sustainable feedstock sources in advancing the feasibility and eco-friendliness of PHAs as a promising biopolymer alternative. Full article
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