Advanced Functional Polymeric Materials for Biomedical Applications

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomacromolecules, Biobased and Biodegradable Polymers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 April 2024) | Viewed by 2327

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
BIO-IT Foundry Technology Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 46241, Republic of Korea
Interests: biomaterials; tissue engineering; multi-functional nanomaterials and nanocomposites; electrospun nanofiber mats; hydrogels; bioinks
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CATERS Laboratory, CSIR – Central Leather Research Institute, Chennai 600 020, India
Interests: nanomaterials; polymer; sensor; tissue engineering; bio-imaging; smart leather

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Laboratory of Functional Molecules and Materials, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo 255000, Shandong, China
Interests: bionanomaterials and nanocomposites; electrospun nanofibers; bionanosensor; biomedical applications; toxicity; gas sensing

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Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, College of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Pusan National University, Busan 46241, Republic of Korea
Interests: nanobiomaterials; tissue engineering; regenerative medicine; 3D bioprinting; cells/tissues/organs-on-chips; medical devices
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues

The design, fabrication, and biomedical applications of bioactive polymers represent one of the developing fields of science. The knowledge of tailoring polymers has allowed researchers to produce numerous multi-functional biomaterials and find diverse biomedical applications, such as drug delivery, bioimaging, tissue engineering, etc. The insights into the nano- or micro-level changes, such as molecular bond arrangement and morphology, provide information about macroscopic properties of polymeric materials, such as shape, color, and functionality, which determine cell–biomaterial interaction and biocompatibility. Smart polymers are sensitive to external environments, including chemicals, light, temperature, and magnetic or electrical fields. Due to the emerging technologies, biocompatible polymers have been fabricated in different forms, such as thin film, nanoparticles, composites, hydrogel, nanofiber mat, 3D-printed gel, and organs-on-chips.

The present Special Issue welcomes contributions in the form of articles, reviews, or communication on the broad topic of design and fabrication of advanced functional polymeric materials for diverse biomedical applications.

Dr. Iruthaya Pandi Selestin Raja
Dr. Mohan Vedhanayagam
Dr. Rajan Ramachandran
Prof. Dr. Dong-Wook Han
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biomaterials
  • nanomaterials and nanocomposite
  • biofabrication
  • tissue engineering
  • drug delivery
  • bioimaging
  • biosensors
  • stimuli-responsive polymers
  • cell-biomaterial interaction
  • cell biocompatibility

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

17 pages, 6418 KiB  
Article
Investigation on Centrifugally Spun Fibrous PCL/3-Methyl Mannoside Mats for Wound Healing Application
by Soloman Agnes Mary, Naisini Ariram, Arun Gopinath, Senthil Kumar Chinnaiyan, Iruthayapandi Selestin Raja, Bindia Sahu, Venkateshwarapuram Rengaswami Giri Dev, Dong-Wook Han and Balaraman Madhan
Polymers 2023, 15(5), 1293; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15051293 - 3 Mar 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1557
Abstract
Fibrous structures, in general, have splendid advantages in different forms of micro- and nanomembranes in various fields, including tissue engineering, filtration, clothing, energy storage, etc. In the present work, we develop a fibrous mat by blending the bioactive extract of Cassia auriculata (CA) [...] Read more.
Fibrous structures, in general, have splendid advantages in different forms of micro- and nanomembranes in various fields, including tissue engineering, filtration, clothing, energy storage, etc. In the present work, we develop a fibrous mat by blending the bioactive extract of Cassia auriculata (CA) with polycaprolactone (PCL) using the centrifugal spinning (c-spinning) technique for tissue-engineered implantable material and wound dressing applications. The fibrous mats were developed at a centrifugal speed of 3500 rpm. The PCL concentration for centrifugal spinning with CA extract was optimized at 15% w/v of PCL to achieve better fiber formation. Increasing the extract concentration by more than 2% resulted in crimping of fibers with irregular morphology. The development of fibrous mats using a dual solvent combination resulted in fine pores on the fiber structure. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images showed that the surface morphology of the fibers in the produced fiber mats (PCL and PCL-CA) was highly porous. Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis revealed that the CA extract contained 3-methyl mannoside as the predominant component. The in vitro cell line studies using NIH3T3 fibroblasts demonstrated that the CA-PCL nanofiber mat was highly biocompatible, supporting cell proliferation. Hence, we conclude that the c-spun, CA-incorporating nanofiber mat can be employed as a tissue-engineered construct for wound healing applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Functional Polymeric Materials for Biomedical Applications)
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