Effects of Viticultural Practices and Edaphoclimatic Conditions on Grape and Wine Quality

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Crop Physiology and Crop Production".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 July 2023) | Viewed by 11700

Special Issue Editors

Escuela de Agronomía, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Mayor, Huechuraba 8580000, Chile
Interests: amino acids; berry quality; edaphoclimatic conditions; phenolic compounds: terroir; viticultural practices; volatile compounds
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Institute of grape and wine science (ICVV-CSIC) Finca la Grajera,Burgos road km 6, 26080 logrono, la Rioja, Spain
Interests: grape and wine quality; volatile composition; sensory analysis; abiotic stress effect on grape quality; sustainable viticulture
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Centro de Investigación Intihuasi, Instituto de Investigaciones Agropecuarias (INIA), Colina San Joaquín s/n, La Serena 1700000, Chile
Interests: grapevine phenology; precision viticulture; climate change; viticultural practices
Département des sciences naturelles, Université du Québec en Outaouais, Gatineau, QC J0V 1V0, Canada
Interests: northern viticulture; abiotic stress in perennial plants; resistant Vitis varieties; metabolomics; organic viticulture; climate change

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Viticulture represents a relevant sector in the economy of the OIV’s Member states and of emerging countries. Global warming has provoked a series of changes at the productive level, opening possibilities for the study of adaptative strategies and for the development of viticulture in new agricultural regions. 

Variations in temperature, relative humidity, water availability, and UV radiation, among others, may affect vine physiology, productivity, berry quality, and wine typicity. Viticultural practices and edaphoclimatic conditions affect grape and wine quality, and their understanding may provide us valuable information for vineyard management and to define harvesting time.

This Special Issue is opened to a wide range of manuscripts that evaluate the effects of viticultural strategies and edaphoclimatic conditions on vine physiology, berry quality, and wine typicity. Manuscripts covering different topics such as abiotic and biotic stress, vine phenology, bioclimatic indices, selection of vineyard, planting material, training systems, crop thinning, shoot trimming, leaf removal, canopy management, irrigation, plant hormones, and foliar fertilization, among others, are highly invited.

Dr. Gastón Gutiérrez-Gamboa
Dr. Mar Vilanova de la Torre
Dr. Nicolás Verdugo-Vásquez
Dr. Karine Pedneault
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • berry quality
  • climate change adaptation
  • cold climate viticulture
  • edaphoclimatic conditions
  • precision viticulture
  • subtropical viticulture
  • table grape production
  • viticultural practices
  • wine typicity
  • terroir

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 2563 KiB  
Article
Evolution of Physicochemical Properties and Phenolic Maturity of Vilana, Vidiano, Kotsifali and Mandilari Wine Grape Cultivars (Vitis vinifera L.) during Ripening
Plants 2022, 11(24), 3547; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11243547 - 15 Dec 2022
Viewed by 981
Abstract
Determining the optimum harvest time is a significant factor affecting the quality of the grapes and the wine. Monitoring the evolution of grapes’ physicochemical properties and phenolic maturity during ripening could be a valuable tool for determining the optimum harvest time. In this [...] Read more.
Determining the optimum harvest time is a significant factor affecting the quality of the grapes and the wine. Monitoring the evolution of grapes’ physicochemical properties and phenolic maturity during ripening could be a valuable tool for determining the optimum harvest time. In this study, the total phenolic content, antioxidant activity, flavonols, flavanols, anthocyanins and resveratrol content were determined during the last weeks of ripening for the white cultivars Vilana and Vidiano, as well as for the red cultivars Kotsifali and Mandilari (Vitis vinifera L.). According to the results, an early harvest for the white cultivars and a late harvest for the red cultivars may increase the total phenolics and trans-resveratrol content in grapes and wine. An early harvest would be desirable to maintain high flavanols content and high levels of antioxidant activity in the grapes’ skin and seeds. Conversely, a late harvest for the red cultivars may be desirable to increase the total flavonols and anthocyanin content in grapes and wines. Full article
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