The Role of Abscisic Acid in Plant Abiotic Stress Responses

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Response to Abiotic Stress and Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2020) | Viewed by 7927

Special Issue Editors

Department of Biology, Biochemist and Environmental Sciences, School of Technology and Experimental Sciences (ESTCE),12071 Castelló de la Plana, Spain
Interests: plant hormones; tomato; arabidopsis; molecular biology; genetics; plant physiology; plant biotechnology; plant signal transduction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plant growth and development are altered by environmental abiotic stresses, the harmful effects of which are increased by climate change and global warming. Hence, alone or in combination, abiotic stresses have become a key factor collectively limiting agricultural yield and productivity worldwide. To hamper the consequences of abiotic stress, plants have designed molecular mechanisms of resilience to produce a large number of stress-responsive gene products. Some of them are involved in short-term plant responses to avoid abiotic stress, but others are involved in long-term plant stress tolerance. Abiotic stress-responsive gene products include chaperone proteins, enzymes involved in phytohormones biosynthesis and metabolism, water channel and transport proteins, detoxification enzymes, and a variety of signal transduction proteins including kinases, phosphatases, and transcription factors. Among plant hormones controlling molecular mechanisms of resilience, abscisic acid (ABA) has been regarded as the universal stress hormone. However, hormonal crosstalk with other hormones is crucial to fine-tune plant stress responses, especially when a combination of abiotic stresses occur in crop fields.

The ABA signaling pathway has been shown to be very complex, with a multitude of regulatory components that act both positively to transduce the signal or negatively to block it. Moreover, phosphorylation/dephosphorylation events and protein modifications such as nitration, ubiquitylation, or sumolization are used by the plant to modulate the ABA signaling output. The discovery of new elements modulating the ABA signaling pathway will extend our knowledge of the regulation of plants’ abiotic stress responses. Moreover, new omics technologies will allow the study of non-model plants, pointing to new and specific gene functions in abiotic stress responses.

Therefore, this Special Issue will focus on the latest findings in all these aspects of the role developed by ABA in mechanisms steering plant responses to abiotic stresses.

Dr. Miguel González-Guzmán
Dr. Vicente Arbona
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • abscisic acid
  • plant tolerance
  • model and non-model plants
  • hormonal crosstalk
  • stress combination
  • omics technology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 1569 KiB  
Article
Early Molecular Responses of Tomato to Combined Moderate Water Stress and Tomato Red Spider Mite Tetranychus evansi Attack
Plants 2020, 9(9), 1131; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9091131 - 31 Aug 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3051
Abstract
Interaction between plants and their environment is changing as a consequence of the climate change and global warming, increasing the performance and dispersal of some pest species which become invasive species. Tetranychus evansi also known as the tomato red spider mite, is an [...] Read more.
Interaction between plants and their environment is changing as a consequence of the climate change and global warming, increasing the performance and dispersal of some pest species which become invasive species. Tetranychus evansi also known as the tomato red spider mite, is an invasive species which has been reported to increase its performance when feeding in the tomato cultivar Moneymaker (MM) under water deficit conditions. In order to clarify the underlying molecular events involved, we examined early plant molecular changes occurring on MM during T. evansi infestation alone or in combination with moderate drought stress. Hormonal profiling of MM plants showed an increase in abscisic acid (ABA) levels in drought-stressed plants while salicylic acid (SA) levels were higher in drought-stressed plants infested with T. evansi, indicating that SA is involved in the regulation of plant responses to this stress combination. Changes in the expression of ABA-dependent DREB2, NCED1, and RAB18 genes confirmed the presence of drought-dependent molecular responses in tomato plants and indicated that these responses could be modulated by the tomato red spider mite. Tomato metabolic profiling identified 42 differentially altered compounds produced by T. evansi attack, moderate drought stress, and/or their combination, reinforcing the idea of putative manipulation of tomato plant responses by tomato red spider mite. Altogether, these results indicate that the tomato red spider mite acts modulating plant responses to moderate drought stress by interfering with the ABA and SA hormonal responses, providing new insights into the early events occurring on plant biotic and abiotic stress interaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Abscisic Acid in Plant Abiotic Stress Responses)
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19 pages, 2007 KiB  
Article
Silicon and Gibberellins: Synergistic Function in Harnessing ABA Signaling and Heat Stress Tolerance in Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.)
Plants 2020, 9(5), 620; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9050620 - 13 May 2020
Cited by 56 | Viewed by 3926
Abstract
Date palm is one of the most economically vital fruit crops in North African and Middle East countries, including Oman. A controlled experiment was conducted to investigate the integrative effects of silicon (Si) and gibberellic acid (GA3) on date palm growth [...] Read more.
Date palm is one of the most economically vital fruit crops in North African and Middle East countries, including Oman. A controlled experiment was conducted to investigate the integrative effects of silicon (Si) and gibberellic acid (GA3) on date palm growth and heat stress. The exogenous application of Si and GA3 significantly promoted plant growth attributes under heat stress (44 ± 1 °C). The hormonal modulation (abscisic acid [ABA] and salicylic acid [SA]), antioxidant accumulation, and the expression of abiotic stress-related genes were evaluated. Interestingly, heat-induced oxidative stress was markedly reduced by the integrative effects of Si and GA3 when compared to their sole application, with significant reductions in superoxide anions and lipid peroxidation. The reduction of oxidative stress was attributed to the enhancement of polyphenol oxidase, catalase, peroxidase, and ascorbate peroxidase activities as well as the upregulation of their synthesis related genes expression viz. GPX2, CAT, Cyt-Cu/Zn SOD, and glyceraldehyde3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (GAPDH). The results showed the activation of heat shock factor related genes (especially HsfA3) during exogenous Si and GA3 as compared to the control. Furthermore, the transcript accumulation of ABA signaling-related genes (PYL4, PYL8, and PYR1) were significantly reduced with the combined treatment of Si and GA3, leading to reduced production of ABA and, subsequently, SA antagonism via its increased accumulation. These findings suggest that the combined application of Si and GA3 facilitate plant growth and metabolic regulation, impart tolerance against stress, and offers novel stress alleviating strategies for a green revolution in sustainable food security. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Abscisic Acid in Plant Abiotic Stress Responses)
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