Cyanobacteria, Algae and Plants—from Biology to Biotechnology Volume II

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2024 | Viewed by 3859

Special Issue Editors

Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 42122 Reggio Emilia, Italy
Interests: plant acoustics; BVOCs; plant communication; ancient plant medicine; microalgae
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Photosynthetic organisms have created many milestones in the history of life: they helped to shape Earth's atmosphere as we know it today and they are the basis of almost all food chains; therefore, in a certain sense, they are the basis for life on Earth. From a human point of view, plants have provided material to build shelter and procure medicine, food, and, of course, oxygen. Microalgae and cyanobacteria provide us with almost half the oxygen we breathe and absorb a quarter of the CO2 produced by fossil fuels, while cyanobacteria are responsible for first introducing oxygen into the Earth’s anoxygenic atmosphere more than three billion years ago. Algae have often been associated with plants and are classified accordingly, as they share some peculiar traits, and blue-green algae, or cyanobacteria, have been considered close to microalgae, since they derive energy from sunlight like algae and plants through photosynthesis. However, since they do not have a nuclear membrane, they are prokaryotes.

Cyanobacteria, microalgae, and plants are beneficial and promising organisms for the sustainable production of food, feed, materials, chemicals, and fuels. To reach sustainability, considerable attention must be given to both strains and cultivars and available, new tools.

From biology to biotechnology, research today should aim to eradicate hunger and illness in the world and build a greener future. This Special Issue of Plants is focused on the most up-to-date research on these topics.

In this Special Issue, we would like to present original research articles and reviews related, but not limited to:

  • The knowledge of and biotechnological applications for plant growth and cultivation, including specific aspects of sustainable agriculture and potential benefits to the environment and various other dimensions of human life;
  • The bio-sequestration of CO2;
  • The remediation of polluted waters/soils;
  • Microalgal and cyanobacterial biomass production and applications.

Prof. Dr. Luca Forti
Prof. Dr. Laura Arru
Prof. Dr. Moreno Bondi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food
  • green chemistry
  • applications
  • sustainable agriculture
  • CO2 capture
  • cyanobacteria
  • microalgae
  • biofuel
  • bioproduction
  • bioremediation
  • biotechnology
  • microorganisms
  • plants
  • biocatalysis
  • commercial
  • feedstock

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

16 pages, 23066 KiB  
Article
Effects of Light Intensity on the Growth and Biochemical Composition in Various Microalgae Grown at High CO2 Concentrations
Plants 2023, 12(22), 3876; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12223876 - 16 Nov 2023
Viewed by 687
Abstract
In modern energy, various technologies for absorbing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere are being considered, including photosynthetic microalgae. An important task is to obtain maximum productivity at high concentrations of CO2 in gas–air mixtures. In this regard, the aim of the investigation [...] Read more.
In modern energy, various technologies for absorbing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere are being considered, including photosynthetic microalgae. An important task is to obtain maximum productivity at high concentrations of CO2 in gas–air mixtures. In this regard, the aim of the investigation is to study the effect of light intensity on the biomass growth and biochemical composition of five different microalgae strains: Arthrospira platensis, Chlorella ellipsoidea, Chlorella vulgaris, Gloeotila pulchra, and Elliptochloris subsphaerica. To assess the viability of microalgae cells, the method of cytochemical staining with methylene blue, which enables identifying dead cells during microscopy, was used. The microalgae were cultivated at 6% CO2 and five different intensities: 80, 120, 160, 200, and 245 μmol quanta·m−2·s−1. The maximum growth rate among all strains was obtained for C. vulgaris (0.78 g·L−1·d−1) at an illumination intensity of 245 µmol quanta·m−2·s−1. For E. subsphaerica and A. platensis, similar results (approximately 0.59 and 0.25 g·L−1·d−1 for each strain) were obtained at an illumination intensity of 160 and 245 µmol quanta·m−2·s−1. A decrease in protein content with an increase in illumination was noted for C. vulgaris (from 61.0 to 46.6%) and A. platensis (from 43.8 to 33.6%), and a slight increase in lipid content was shown by A. platensis (from 17.8 to 21.4%). The possibility of increasing microalgae biomass productivity by increasing illumination has been demonstrated. This result can also be considered as showing potential for enhanced lipid microalgae production for biodiesel applications. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 4415 KiB  
Article
The Utilisation of Antarctic Microalgae Isolated from Paradise Bay (Antarctic Peninsula) in the Bioremediation of Diesel
Plants 2023, 12(13), 2536; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12132536 - 03 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1524
Abstract
Research has confirmed that the utilisation of Antarctic microorganisms, such as bacteria, yeasts and fungi, in the bioremediation of diesel may provide practical alternative approaches. However, to date there has been very little attention towards Antarctic microalgae as potential hydrocarbon degraders. Therefore, this [...] Read more.
Research has confirmed that the utilisation of Antarctic microorganisms, such as bacteria, yeasts and fungi, in the bioremediation of diesel may provide practical alternative approaches. However, to date there has been very little attention towards Antarctic microalgae as potential hydrocarbon degraders. Therefore, this study focused on the utilisation of an Antarctic microalga in the bioremediation of diesel. The studied microalgal strain was originally obtained from a freshwater ecosystem in Paradise Bay, western Antarctic Peninsula. When analysed in systems with and without aeration, this microalgal strain achieved a higher growth rate under aeration. To maintain the growth of this microalga optimally, a conventional one-factor-at a-time (OFAT) analysis was also conducted. Based on the optimized parameters, algal growth and diesel degradation performance was highest at pH 7.5 with 0.5 mg/L NaCl concentration and 0.5 g/L of NaNO3 as a nitrogen source. This currently unidentified microalga flourished in the presence of diesel, with maximum algal cell numbers on day 7 of incubation in the presence of 1% v/v diesel. Chlorophyll a, b and carotenoid contents of the culture were greatest on day 9 of incubation. The diesel degradation achieved was 64.5% of the original concentration after 9 days. Gas chromatography analysis showed the complete mineralisation of C7–C13 hydrocarbon chains. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis confirmed that strain WCY_AQ5_3 fully degraded the hydrocarbon with bioabsorption of the products. Morphological and molecular analyses suggested that this spherical, single-celled green microalga was a member of the genus Micractinium. The data obtained confirm that this microalga is a suitable candidate for further research into the degradation of diesel in Antarctica. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

20 pages, 5167 KiB  
Article
The Influence of Elevated CO2 Concentrations on the Growth of Various Microalgae Strains
Plants 2023, 12(13), 2470; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12132470 - 28 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1222
Abstract
The influence of elevated CO2 concentrations on the growth and viability of various microalgae strains was studied. Arthrospira platensis, Chlorella ellipsoidea, Chlorella vulgaris, Gloeotila pulchra, and Elliptochloris subsphaerica were tested. The cultivation of microalgae was carried out at [...] Read more.
The influence of elevated CO2 concentrations on the growth and viability of various microalgae strains was studied. Arthrospira platensis, Chlorella ellipsoidea, Chlorella vulgaris, Gloeotila pulchra, and Elliptochloris subsphaerica were tested. The cultivation of microalgae was carried out at constant CO2 concentrations (0.04, 3, 6, or 9%—sequentially from lower to higher concentrations), under constant (24 h·day−1) illumination with an intensity of 74.3 µmol quanta·m−2·s−1, and a constant temperature of 23.5 ± 0.5 °C. The optical density of the microalgae biomass, pH, and the chemical composition of the culture medium were measured. Microscopy (including the cytochemical microscopic method) was conducted to monitor the state of the microalgae. The highest biomass growth rate (0.37 g·L−1·day−1), among all experiments, was achieved for Chlorella vulgaris at CO2 = 3% and for Chlorella ellipsoidea at CO2 = 6 and 9%. The lowest growth rate (0.12 g·L−1·day−1) was achieved for Arthrospira platensis at CO2 = 3 and 9%. The microscopy results showed the absence or a minimum number of dead cells of the strains under selected conditions. The ability to maintain the viability of cultures up to significant concentrations of CO2 = 9% was due to adaptation (gradual increase in CO2 concentrations in the experiments). Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop