Pesticide Residues in Plants

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2024) | Viewed by 971

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory for Managing Biotic and Chemical Threats to the Quality and Safety of Agro-Products, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs Key Laboratory for Pesticide Residue Detection, Institute of Agro-Products Safety and Nutrition, Zhejiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Hangzhou 310021, China
Interests: pesticide residues; environmental fate of pesticides; uptake and translocation of pesticides in plants; nano pesticides

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest Insects and Rodents, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
Interests: pesticides toxicology and health risks; chiral pesticides and fate differences; fate characteristics and enantio-/stereo-selectivity; toxicity difference and regulation mechanism

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Pesticides play a vital role in plant protection as they are widely used across the globe for their low cost and high efficiency. However, these chemicals can remain in plants as residues through direct contact and plant uptake. The accumulation of pesticide residues in plants can lead to a range of negative effects on the environment, food safety, and human health. Therefore, it is essential to conduct detailed analyses of pesticide residues and understand the fate of pesticides in plants.

This Special Issue of Plants will focus on pesticide residues and their fate in plants, including the development and validation of analytical methods, risk assessment, the uptake and translocation of pesticides, metabolism, and other related topics. By analyzing the accumulation and fate of pesticide residues in plants, researchers can gain a deeper understanding of the potential environmental and health impacts of pesticide use.

Furthermore, the issue will explore ways to mitigate the negative impacts of pesticide residues in plants. This may include the development of new application technology or the implementation of agricultural practices that reduce the need for pesticides. The issue will be of great significance for policymakers, researchers, and farmers, as they seek to balance the benefits of pesticide use with the need to protect the environment and human health.

Dr. Changpeng Zhang
Dr. Zenglong Chen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pesticides
  • residues
  • analytical methods
  • dissipation
  • crops
  • risk assessment
  • uptake
  • translocation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

9 pages, 277 KiB  
Article
Residue Analysis and Dietary Risk Assessment of Pymetrozine in Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) and Chrysanthemum morifolium (Ramat)
by Yuting Chen, Hui Ye, Nan Fang, Yuqin Luo, Xiangyun Wang, Yanjie Li, Hongmei He, Youpu Cheng and Changpeng Zhang
Plants 2023, 12(22), 3905; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12223905 - 20 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 749
Abstract
Pymetrozine is used on potato (S. tuberosum) and Chrysanthemum morifolium (C. morifolium) to obtain greater yield and quality. However, pesticide use carries the potential for residues to remain and be detected on harvested crops. Therefore, the aim of this [...] Read more.
Pymetrozine is used on potato (S. tuberosum) and Chrysanthemum morifolium (C. morifolium) to obtain greater yield and quality. However, pesticide use carries the potential for residues to remain and be detected on harvested crops. Therefore, the aim of this study was to estimate pesticide residues in S. tuberosum and C. morifolium products that are commercially available for human consumption and to assess the associated dietary risks. For this study, a total of 340 samples (200 S. tuberosum samples and 140 C. morifolium samples) were collected randomly from supermarkets and farmer’s markets. Residues of pymetrozine in S. tuberosum and C. morifolium were detected by using an established and validated QuECHERS-HPLC-MS / MS method, while a dietary risk assessment of pymetrozine in S. tuberosum and C. morifolium was performed using these data. The detection rates of pymetrozine in S. tuberosum and C. morifolium samples were 92.31% and 98.17%, respectively, with residues not more than 0.036 and 0.024 mg/kg, respectively. Based on these results, the dietary risk assessment indicated that the intake of pymetrozine residues in S. tuberosum and C. morifolium does not pose a health risk. This work improved our understanding of the potential exposure risk of pymetrozine in S. tuberosum and C. morifolium. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pesticide Residues in Plants)
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