Potential of Nano/Microemulsions for Drugs and Phytochemicals Delivery, 2nd Edition

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923). This special issue belongs to the section "Drug Delivery and Controlled Release".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 August 2024 | Viewed by 525

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Pharmaceutical Sciences Graduate Program, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre 90610-000, Brazil
Interests: pharmaceutical technology; nanotechnology; natural products; essential oils
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Pharmacy, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre 90610-000, RS, Brazil
Interests: nanoemulsions; spontaneous emulsification; skin delivery; intranasal delivery; natural products
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanoemulsions consist of nanoscale oil/water dispersions stabilized by an appropriate surfactant system in which the drug is incorporated into the oil core and/or adsorbed at the interface. They emerged from the parenteral emulsions more than fifty years ago as they offered an appealing alternative for the administration of poorly water-soluble drugs due to their biocompatibility, stability, ability to reduce the toxicity of cytotoxic drugs, and ability to protect drugs from degradation. Nanoemulsions can be prepared using simple and easy scale-up techniques that enable the solubilization of high quantities of hydrophobic compounds, which represent the majority of new chemical- and plant-based entities. In addition, they are the most deeply studied nanostructure systems to encapsulate essential oils, that replace the oily core conferring to its bioactivities. With specific excipients, such as surfactants and polymers, physicochemical properties are improved providing gains in mucoadhesiveness, permeability, and interaction with biological membranes. In this context, the advantages of these relatively simple colloidal systems have expanded their use from the parenteral to other administration routes, such as oral, transdermal, ocular, and nasal.

Taking into consideration the advantages of nanoemulsions, for this Special Issue, original research and review articles addressing recent advances of nanoemulsions formulations for drugs and phytochemicals delivery using different routes of administration are welcomed.

Prof. Dr. Letícia Scherer Koester
Prof. Dr. Helder Teixeira
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • nanoemulsions
  • natural products
  • essential oils
  • drugs
  • high-pressure homogenization
  • spontaneous emulsification
  • microfluidization
  • biocompatiblity
  • parenteral
  • oral
  • nasal
  • transdermal
  • ocular

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

13 pages, 3065 KiB  
Article
Topical Nanoemulsions as Delivery Systems for Green Extracts of Pterocaulon balansae Aiming at the Treatment of Sporotrichosis
by Bruna Medeiros-Neves, Daiane Heidrich, Roselena Silvestri Schuh, Nathalya Tesch Brazil, Flávia Nathiely Silveira Fachel, Eduardo Cassel, Rubem Mário Figueiró Vargas, Maria Lúcia Scroferneker, Gilsane Lino von Poser, Letícia Scherer Koester and Helder Ferreira Teixeira
Pharmaceutics 2024, 16(4), 492; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics16040492 - 02 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Coumarins are benzopyrones found in several plant genera, including Pterocaulon (Asteraceae). These compounds represent an important source of new treatments, especially as antimicrobial and antifungal agents. In this study, two coumarin-rich extracts from Pterocaulon balansae using green technologies were obtained through aqueous maceration [...] Read more.
Coumarins are benzopyrones found in several plant genera, including Pterocaulon (Asteraceae). These compounds represent an important source of new treatments, especially as antimicrobial and antifungal agents. In this study, two coumarin-rich extracts from Pterocaulon balansae using green technologies were obtained through aqueous maceration (AE) and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE). Such extracts were incorporated into nanoemulsions (NAE and NSFE) composed of a medium-chain triglyceride oil core stabilized by phospholipids. The nanoemulsions exhibited droplet sizes between 127 and 162 nm, pH above 5.0, and viscosity of approximately 1.0 cP, properties compatible with the topical route. The coumarins permeation/retention from formulations through ear porcine skin using Franz-type diffusion cells were evaluated. Whatever the extract, coumarins were distributed in skin layers, especially in the dermis in both intact and impaired (tape stripping) skin. In addition, a significant increase in coumarins that reached up to the receptor fluid was observed for impaired skin, with increases of approximately threefold for NAE and fourfold for NSFE. Finally, antifungal activity of nanoemulsions was evaluated according to minimum inhibitory concentrations, and the values were 250 µg/mL for all strains tested. The overall results demonstrated the feasibility of incorporating P. balansae extracts into nanoemulsions and showed a potential alternative for the treatment of sporotrichosis. Full article
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