Nanoparticulate Systems for Nose-to-Brain Drug Delivery

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923). This special issue belongs to the section "Drug Delivery and Controlled Release".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2023) | Viewed by 2940

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Pharmaceutics, Institute of Pharmacy, Nirma University, Ahmedabad 382481, Gujarat, India
Interests: novel drug delivery systems; nanotechnology; solubility enhancement; targeted delivery; quality by design

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Guest Editor
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Gulf Medical University, Ajman P.O. Box 4184, United Arab Emirates
Interests: nanotechnology in drug delivery systems; solubilization enhancement technologies; preformulation and material characterization; film-based drug delivery systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The major barriers for the delivery of drugs to the central nervous system are the blood–brain barrier and blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier which restrict most of the molecules entering the brain. In contrast, the direct nose-to-brain drug delivery system is a safe, feasible, mostly non-invasive, and convenient form of formulation approaches that could be considered an effective strategy, particularly for low molecular weight and macromolecular neurotherapeutics. Presently various strategies and approaches especially using nanoparticulate systems for enhanced nose-to-brain drug and biomolecule delivery have been investigated and have shown immense potential. Rapid advancement is expected in the field of specifically designed novel nanocarrier-based drug delivery systems to overcome different barriers for targeted drug delivery to the brain microenvironments. Moreover, combinatorial strategies have also been proved a very promising approach. Furthermore, focusing on the technological advances taking place in the development of novel drug delivery devices for intranasal administration is significant for brain targeting through the nose. Toxicological and regulatory aspects of various ingredients used to develop direct nose-to-brain drug delivery vehicles are a matter of paramount importance. Recent patents and the current clinical status of the potential neurotherapeutics with diverse pharmaceutical and biomedical applications should be highlighted.

This Special Issue will highlight recent advances and challenges encountered during the development of nanoparticulate drug delivery approaches and novel drug administration devices for the treatment of neurological conditions.

Prof. Dr. Jigar N. Shah 
Prof. Dr. Shery Jacob
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • nanoparticles
  • drug delivery
  • brain targeting
  • polymers
  • in vitro release
  • in vivo study
  • nasal route
  • penetration enhancer
  • neurotherapeutics
  • bioadhesion
  • blood–brain barrier
  • neuro-ailments
  • neurological disorders

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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22 pages, 25607 KiB  
Article
A Dual Therapy of Nanostructured Lipid Carrier Loaded with Teriflunomide—A Dihydro-Orotate Dehydrogenase Inhibitor and an miR-155-Antagomir in Cuprizone-Induced C57BL/6J Mouse
by Trideva Sastri Koduru, Vishal N. Gupta, Balamuralidhara Veeranna and Shanmuganathan Seetharaman
Pharmaceutics 2023, 15(4), 1254; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics15041254 - 17 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1751
Abstract
The effective treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS) has been challenging due to the limited ability of therapeutic agents to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB). In this study, we investigated the potential of nanocarrier systems to deliver [...] Read more.
The effective treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS) has been challenging due to the limited ability of therapeutic agents to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB). In this study, we investigated the potential of nanocarrier systems to deliver miR-155-antagomir-teriflunomide (TEF) dual therapy to the brain via intranasal (IN) administration to manage MS-associated neurodegeneration and demyelination. Our results showed that the combinatorial therapy of miR-155-antagomir and TEF loaded in nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) significantly increased brain concentration and improved targeting potential. The novelty of this study lies in the use of a combinatorial therapy approach of miR-155-antagomir and TEF loaded in NLCs. This is a significant finding, as the effective delivery of therapeutic molecules to the CNS has been a challenge in treating neurodegenerative disorders. Additionally, this study sheds light on the potential use of RNA-targeting therapies in personalized medicine, which could revolutionize the way CNS disorders are managed. Furthermore, our findings suggest that nanocarrier-loaded therapeutic agents have great potential for safe and economical delivery in treating CNS disorders. Our study provides novel insights into the effective delivery of therapeutic molecules via the IN route for managing neurodegenerative disorders. In particular, our results demonstrate the potential of delivering miRNA and TEF via the intranasal route using the NLC system. We also demonstrate that the long-term use of RNA-targeting therapies could be a promising tool in personalized medicine. Importantly, using a cuprizone-induced animal model, our study also investigated the effects of TEF-miR155-antagomir-loaded NLCs on demyelination and axonal damage. Following six weeks of treatment, the TEF-miR155-antagomir-loaded NLCs potentially lowered the demyelination and enhanced the bioavailability of the loaded therapeutic molecules. Our study is a paradigm shift in delivering miRNAs and TEF via the intranasal route and highlights the potential of this approach for managing neurodegenerative disorders. In conclusion, our study provides critical insights into the effective delivery of therapeutic molecules via the IN route for managing CNS disorders, and especially MS. Our findings have significant implications for the future development of nanocarrier-based therapies and personalized medicine. Our results provide a strong foundation for further studies and the potential to develop safe and economic therapeutics for CNS disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticulate Systems for Nose-to-Brain Drug Delivery)
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Review

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30 pages, 1085 KiB  
Review
Nasal Delivery to the Brain: Harnessing Nanoparticles for Effective Drug Transport
by Shivani Gandhi, Divyesh H. Shastri, Jigar Shah, Anroop B. Nair and Shery Jacob
Pharmaceutics 2024, 16(4), 481; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics16040481 - 01 Apr 2024
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Abstract
The nose-to-brain drug-delivery system has emerged as a promising strategy to overcome the challenges associated with conventional drug administration for central nervous system disorders. This emerging field is driven by the anatomical advantages of the nasal route, enabling the direct transport of drugs [...] Read more.
The nose-to-brain drug-delivery system has emerged as a promising strategy to overcome the challenges associated with conventional drug administration for central nervous system disorders. This emerging field is driven by the anatomical advantages of the nasal route, enabling the direct transport of drugs from the nasal cavity to the brain, thereby circumventing the blood–brain barrier. This review highlights the significance of the anatomical features of the nasal cavity, emphasizing its high permeability and rich blood supply that facilitate rapid drug absorption and onset of action, rendering it a promising domain for neurological therapeutics. Exploring recent developments and innovations in different nanocarriers such as liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles, dendrimers, micelles, nanoemulsions, nanosuspensions, carbon nanotubes, mesoporous silica nanoparticles, and nanogels unveils their diverse functions in improving drug-delivery efficiency and targeting specificity within this system. To minimize the potential risk of nanoparticle-induced toxicity in the nasal mucosa, this article also delves into the latest advancements in the formulation strategies commonly involving surface modifications, incorporating cutting-edge materials, the adjustment of particle properties, and the development of novel formulations to improve drug stability, release kinetics, and targeting specificity. These approaches aim to enhance drug absorption while minimizing adverse effects. These strategies hold the potential to catalyze the advancement of safer and more efficient nose-to-brain drug-delivery systems, consequently revolutionizing treatments for neurological disorders. This review provides a valuable resource for researchers, clinicians, and pharmaceutical-industry professionals seeking to advance the development of effective and safe therapies for central nervous system disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticulate Systems for Nose-to-Brain Drug Delivery)
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