Nanomedicines in Cancer Therapy

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanomedicine and Nanotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 August 2024 | Viewed by 3534

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Nelson Mandela University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6001, South Africa
Interests: polymers; nanoparticles; wound dressings; skin regeneration; nanofibers; membranes; hydrogels; essential oils; anticancer drugs; antimalarials
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Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, University of Fort Hare, Alice Campus, Alice 5700, Eastern Cape, South Africa
Interests: polymer-based drug delivery systems; wound dressings; organic synthesis; antimalarials; anticancer; polymer–drug conjugates
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Despite many advanced treatment methods in the field of oncology, cancer remains a deadly disease globally. The administration of anticancer drugs is the most common treatment approach for various cancer types. However, most of the currently available anticancer drugs suffer from limitations, including multi-drug resistance, drug toxicity, poor drug bioavailability, etc. Nanomedicines are based on the application of nanotechnology for the monitoring, diagnosis, and treatment of different types of cancers. Nanomedicines have been widely explored and studied in preclinical studies and provide improved therapeutic outcomes when compared to conventional anticancer drugs. Today, there are some nanomedicine formulations and devices on the market and many more undergoing clinical trials and development. They are developed from materials such as polymers, carbon-based materials, metallic and non-metallic nanomaterials. The advantages of nanomedicines include a targeted drug delivery, sustained and controlled drug release, enhanced drug stability, high drug encapsulation efficiency, reduced drug toxicity, high cellular uptake, and an improvement of the pharmacokinetic parameters. Furthermore, nanomedicines can be used for combination chemotherapy, resulting in significant synergistic anticancer activity. This Special Issue is focused on the current status and prospects of nanomedicines based on preclinical and clinical studies for the treatment of cancer. Original research articles and reviews are welcome in this Special Issue. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  1. Nano-based drug delivery systems for the delivery of anticancer drugs;
  2. Nanomedicines in clinical trials;
  3. Nanodevices for cancer diagnoses and monitoring treatment;
  4. Combination therapy employing nanocarriers;
  5. New nanomedicine technologies;
  6. Safety evaluation of nanomedicines;
  7. Biomaterials employed for the design of nanomedicine drug formulations: advantages and limitations;
  8. The mechanisms of interaction between nanomedicines and the immune system;
  9. Limitations associated with the translation of nanomedicines to clinical applications;
  10. Nano-based delivery systems using stimulus-responsive and smart biomaterials;
  11. Success stories of nanomedicine formulations and devices that are currently in clinical use, lessons learnt, and prospects.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Sibusiso Alven
Prof. Dr. Blessing Atim Aderibigbe
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • cancer
  • biomaterials
  • anticancer drugs
  • nanotherapeutics
  • nano-based diagnostic devices
  • nanoparticles
  • polymer–drug conjugates
  • nanoliposomes
  • exosomes
  • nanocapsules
  • dendrimers

Published Papers (2 papers)

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15 pages, 3368 KiB  
Article
Synthesis and Characterization of ZIF-90 Nanoparticles as Potential Brain Cancer Therapy
by Lorenzo Monarca, Francesco Ragonese, Paola Sabbatini, Concetta Caglioti, Matteo Stamegna, Federico Palazzetti, Paolo Sportoletti, Ferdinando Costantino and Bernard Fioretti
Pharmaceutics 2024, 16(3), 414; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics16030414 - 18 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Human glioblastoma is probably the most malignant and aggressive among cerebral tumors, of which it represents approximately 80% of the reported cases, with an overall survival rate that is quite low. Current therapies include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, with associated consistent side effects [...] Read more.
Human glioblastoma is probably the most malignant and aggressive among cerebral tumors, of which it represents approximately 80% of the reported cases, with an overall survival rate that is quite low. Current therapies include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, with associated consistent side effects and low efficacy. The hardness in reaching the site of action, and overcoming the blood–brain barrier, is a major limitation of pharmacological treatments. In this paper, we report the synthesis and characterization of ZIF-90 (ZIF, Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework) nanoparticles as putative carriers of anticancer drugs to the brain. In particular, we successfully evaluated the biocompatibility of these nanoparticles, their stability in body fluids, and their ability to uptake in U251 human glioblastoma cell lines. Furthermore, we managed to synthesize ZIF-90 particles loaded with berberine, an alkaloid reported as a possible effective adjuvant in the treatment of glioblastoma. These findings could suggest ZIF-90 as a possible new strategy for brain cancer therapy and to study the physiological processes present in the central nervous system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomedicines in Cancer Therapy)
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29 pages, 3558 KiB  
Review
Emerging Trends of Nanomedicines in the Management of Prostate Cancer: Perspectives and Potential Applications
by Rohitas Deshmukh, Vaibhav Singh, Ranjit K. Harwansh, Rutvi Agrawal, Akash Garg, Sudarshan Singh, Gehan M. Elossaily, Mohd Nazam Ansari, Nemat Ali and Bhupendra G. Prajapati
Pharmaceutics 2024, 16(3), 297; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics16030297 - 20 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Prostate cancer is one of the most life-threatening disorders that occur in males. It has now become the third most common disease all over the world, and emerging cases and spiking mortality rates are becoming more challenging day by day. Several approaches have [...] Read more.
Prostate cancer is one of the most life-threatening disorders that occur in males. It has now become the third most common disease all over the world, and emerging cases and spiking mortality rates are becoming more challenging day by day. Several approaches have been used to treat prostate cancer, including surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, etc. These are painful and invasive ways of treatment. Primarily, chemotherapy has been associated with numerous drawbacks restricting its further application. The majority of prostate cancers have the potential to become castration-resistant. Prostate cancer cells exhibit resistance to chemotherapy, resistance to radiation, ADT (androgen-deprivation therapy) resistance, and immune stiffness as a result of activating tumor-promoting signaling pathways and developing resistance to various treatment modalities. Nanomedicines such as liposomes, nanoparticles, branched dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, and quantum dots are promising disease management techniques in this context. Nanomedicines can target the drugs to the target site and enhance the drug’s action for a prolonged period. They may also increase the solubility and bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. This review summarizes the current data on nanomedicines for the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer. Thus, nanomedicine is pioneering in disease management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomedicines in Cancer Therapy)
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