Polymers for Wound Dressings

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 August 2023) | Viewed by 13370

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, University of Fort Hare, Alice Campus, Eastern Cape 5700, South Africa
Interests: polymer-based drug delivery systems; wound dressings; organic synthesis; antimalarials; anticancer; polymer-drug conjugates
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Polymers have been widely used for the development of wound dressings. Natural polymers were the earliest scaffold materials used in clinical applications due to their good interactions with cells. Combinations of synthetic and natural polymers have resulted in improved cell attachment, biodegradability, etc. The use of polymers for the design of wound dressings has generated scaffolds in different forms such as nanofibers, membranes, films, foams, sponges, hydrogels, 3D structures, etc. The numerous advantages offered by polymers include excellent tailorable properties, easy processing, flexibility for chemical modifications, affordability, overcoming toxicity, ready availability, degradability, and biocompatibility supporting skin regeneration, and ability to be used as skin substitutes. These features have motivated researchers to design different classes of polymer-based wound dressings with excellent features for different types of wounds, resulting in accelerated wound healing.

This Special Issue of Polymers, entitled "Polymer for Wound Dressing" aims to present a collection of original research and review articles on the development and characterization of polymer-based materials for wound dressings, skin regeneration, and antibacterial treatment. Authors are invited to share recent advances in polymer-based materials developed for wound dressings,  skin regeneration, and polymer-based delivery systems for the delivery of antibacterial agents together with their future perspectives.

Prof. Dr. Blessing Atim Aderibigbe
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • wound dressings
  • 3D printing
  • tissue engineering
  • skin regeneration
  • polymeric scaffolds design
  • biopolymers
  • synthetic polymers
  • chronic wounds
  • acute wounds
  • electrospun nanofibers
  • biomaterials
  • self-healing materials
  • nanomaterials
  • advanced materials
  • regenerative medicine
  • polymer nanoparticles
  • antibacterial activity
  • polymer-based composites
  • sponges
  • foams
  • hydrogels
  • membranes
  • films
  • hydrocolloids
  • polymer-drug conjugates
  • transdermal patches
  • polymeric microneedles

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Review

15 pages, 1038 KiB  
Review
Gellan Gum in Wound Dressing Scaffolds
by Zizo Feketshane, Sibusiso Alven and Blessing Atim Aderibigbe
Polymers 2022, 14(19), 4098; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym14194098 - 30 Sep 2022
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 2695
Abstract
Several factors, such as bacterial infections, underlying conditions, malnutrition, obesity, ageing, and smoking are the most common issues that cause a delayed process of wound healing. Developing wound dressings that promote an accelerated wound healing process and skin regeneration is crucial. The properties [...] Read more.
Several factors, such as bacterial infections, underlying conditions, malnutrition, obesity, ageing, and smoking are the most common issues that cause a delayed process of wound healing. Developing wound dressings that promote an accelerated wound healing process and skin regeneration is crucial. The properties of wound dressings that make them suitable for the acceleration of the wound healing process include good antibacterial efficacy, excellent biocompatibility, and non-toxicity, the ability to provide a moist environment, stimulating cell migration and adhesion, and providing gaseous permeation. Biopolymers have demonstrated features appropriate for the development of effective wound dressing scaffolds. Gellan gum is one of the biopolymers that has attracted great attention in biomedical applications. The wound dressing materials fabricated from gellan gum possess outstanding properties when compared to traditional dressings, such as good biocompatibility, biodegradability, non-toxicity, renewability, and stable nature. This biopolymer has been broadly employed for the development of wound dressing scaffolds in different forms. This review discusses the physicochemical and biological properties of gellan gum-based scaffolds in the management of wounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers for Wound Dressings)
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31 pages, 3086 KiB  
Review
Hybrid-Based Wound Dressings: Combination of Synthetic and Biopolymers
by Blessing Atim Aderibigbe
Polymers 2022, 14(18), 3806; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym14183806 - 12 Sep 2022
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 3001
Abstract
Most commercialized wound dressings are polymer-based. Synthetic and natural polymers have been utilized widely for the development of wound dressings. However, the use of natural polymers is limited by their poor mechanical properties, resulting in their combination with synthetic polymers and other materials [...] Read more.
Most commercialized wound dressings are polymer-based. Synthetic and natural polymers have been utilized widely for the development of wound dressings. However, the use of natural polymers is limited by their poor mechanical properties, resulting in their combination with synthetic polymers and other materials to enhance their mechanical properties. Natural polymers are mostly affordable, biocompatible, and biodegradable with promising antimicrobial activity. They have been further tailored into unique hybrid wound dressings when combined with synthetic polymers and selected biomaterials. Some important features required in an ideal wound dressing include the capability to prevent bacteria invasion, reduce odor, absorb exudates, be comfortable, facilitate easy application and removal as well as frequent changing, prevent further skin tear and irritation when applied or removed, and provide a moist environment and soothing effect, be permeable to gases, etc. The efficacy of polymers in the design of wound dressings cannot be overemphasized. This review article reports the efficacy of wound dressings prepared from a combination of synthetic and natural polymers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers for Wound Dressings)
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23 pages, 1832 KiB  
Review
Insights into the Design of Polyurethane Dressings Suitable for the Stages of Skin Wound-Healing: A Systematic Review
by Maria Morales-González, Luis Eduardo Díaz, Carlos Dominguez-Paz and Manuel F. Valero
Polymers 2022, 14(15), 2990; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym14152990 - 24 Jul 2022
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 3572
Abstract
Dressings made with polyurethanes have been found to exhibit good and varied biological properties that make them good candidates for this application. However, as has been seen, the wound-healing process is complex, which includes four different stages. So far, the design and evaluation [...] Read more.
Dressings made with polyurethanes have been found to exhibit good and varied biological properties that make them good candidates for this application. However, as has been seen, the wound-healing process is complex, which includes four different stages. So far, the design and evaluation of polyurethane for wound dressing has focused on achieving good properties (mechanical, physicochemical, and biological), but each of them separates from the others or even directed at only one of the stages of skin wound-healing. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review is to explore the applications of polyurethanes in wound dressings and to determine whether could be designed to cover more than one stage of skin wound-healing. The PRISMA guidelines were followed. The current research in this field does not consider each stage separately, and the design of polyurethane dressings is focused on covering all the stages of wound healing with a single material but is necessary to replace polyurethanes in short periods of time. Additionally, little emphasis is placed on the hemostasis stage and further characterization of polyurethanes is still needed to correlate mechanical and physicochemical properties with biological properties at each stage of the wound-healing. Current research demonstrates an effort to characterize the materials physiochemically and mechanically, but in terms of their biological properties, most of the literature is based on the performance of histological tests of explants morphologically probing the compromised tissues, which give an indication of the potential use of polyurethanes in the generation of wound-healing dressings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers for Wound Dressings)
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20 pages, 1653 KiB  
Review
Cell Secretome Strategies for Controlled Drug Delivery and Wound-Healing Applications
by Ranya Ibrahim, Hillary Mndlovu, Pradeep Kumar, Samson A. Adeyemi and Yahya E. Choonara
Polymers 2022, 14(14), 2929; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym14142929 - 20 Jul 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3279
Abstract
There is significant interest in using stem cells in the management of cutaneous wounds. However, potential safety, efficacy, and cost problems associated with whole-cell transplantation hinder their clinical application. Secretome, a collective of mesenchymal stem-cell-stored paracrine factors, and immunomodulatory cytokines offer therapeutic potential [...] Read more.
There is significant interest in using stem cells in the management of cutaneous wounds. However, potential safety, efficacy, and cost problems associated with whole-cell transplantation hinder their clinical application. Secretome, a collective of mesenchymal stem-cell-stored paracrine factors, and immunomodulatory cytokines offer therapeutic potential as a cell-free therapy for the treatment of cutaneous wounds. This review explores the possibility of secretome as a treatment for cutaneous wounds and tissue regeneration. The review mainly focuses on in vitro and in vivo investigations that use biomaterials and secretome together to treat wounds, extend secretome retention, and control release to preserve their biological function. The approaches employed for the fabrication of biomaterials with condition media or extracellular vesicles are discussed to identify their future clinical application in wound treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers for Wound Dressings)
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