Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy in Nano-World

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2020) | Viewed by 21207

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Sauletekio Ave 3, LT-10257 Vilnius, Lithuania
Interests: Raman spectroscopy; surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy; sum-frequency generation; electrochemical interface; biospectroscopy; adsorption
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The development of nanomaterials for science, industry and biomedicine requires a molecular-level understanding of interfacial properties; in particular the structure, orientation, interactions, and function of adsorbed (bio)molecules. Such an understanding enables the prediction and discovery of new interfacial effects and allows for their control. This is a challenging task, as techniques suitable for such studies must be both surface sensitive and molecular structure specific. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is an intrinsically nanostructure-based surface vibrational spectroscopy born at the electrochemical interface in 1974. The recent development of the technique is associated with tremendous progress in the construction and control of the physico-chemical properties of nanomaterials and has enabled the emergence of new types of plasmon-enhanced methods, including tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS).

This Special Issue focuses on the molecular-level characterization of nanomaterials using the SERS, TERS, and SHINERS approaches. These techniques are able to provide unique atomistic information on the architecture and function of molecules at surfaces including metal–adsorbate bonding, the orientation of specific molecular groups, chemical reactions at the interface, the secondary structure of biomolecules, interfacial recognition events, and the effects of electrochemical potential on the interface structure. We invite authors to contribute research articles or reviews of the recent progress in understanding the molecular structure and function of nanomaterials based on SERS analysis. Manuscripts devoted to understanding the biomolecule–nanomaterial interface are especially welcome.


Dr. Gediminas Niaura
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • SERS structure and function markers
  • Metal–adsorbate bonding
  • Graphene-family nanomaterials
  • Magnetic nanoparticles
  • 2D materials
  • Self-assembled monolayers
  • Nanoscale chemical analysis
  • SERS
  • TERS
  • SHINERS
  • Vibrations in nanomaterials

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 1847 KiB  
Article
Comparison of Free-Space and Waveguide-Based SERS Platforms
by Nina Turk, Ali Raza, Pieter Wuytens, Hans Demol, Michiel Van Daele, Christophe Detavernier, Andre Skirtach, Kris Gevaert and Roel Baets
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(10), 1401; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9101401 - 01 Oct 2019
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 3518
Abstract
Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) allows for the highly specific detection of molecules by enhancing the inherently weak Raman signals near the surface of plasmonic nanostructures. A variety of plasmonic nanostructures have been developed for SERS signal excitation and collection in a conventional free-space [...] Read more.
Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) allows for the highly specific detection of molecules by enhancing the inherently weak Raman signals near the surface of plasmonic nanostructures. A variety of plasmonic nanostructures have been developed for SERS signal excitation and collection in a conventional free-space microscope, among which the gold nanodomes offer one of the highest SERS enhancements. Nanophotonic waveguides have recently emerged as an alternative to the conventional Raman microscope as they can be used to efficiently excite and collect Raman signals. Integration of plasmonic structures on nanophotonic waveguides enables reproducible waveguide-based excitation and collection of SERS spectra, such as in nanoplasmonic slot waveguides. In this paper, we compare the SERS performance of gold nanodomes, in which the signal is excited and collected in free space, and waveguide-based nanoplasmonic slot waveguide. We evaluate the SERS signal enhancement and the SERS background of the different SERS platforms using a monolayer of nitrothiophenol. We show that the nanoplasmonic slot waveguide approaches the gold nanodomes in terms of the signal-to-background ratio. We additionally demonstrate the first-time detection of a peptide monolayer on a waveguide-based SERS platform, paving the way towards the SERS monitoring of biologically relevant molecules on an integrated lab-on-a-chip platform. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy in Nano-World)
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14 pages, 8955 KiB  
Article
Mussel-Inspired Fabrication of SERS Swabs for Highly Sensitive and Conformal Rapid Detection of Thiram Bactericides
by Jun Liu, Tiantian Si, Lingzi Zhang and Zhiliang Zhang
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(9), 1331; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9091331 - 17 Sep 2019
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 3844
Abstract
As an important sort of dithiocarbamate bactericide, thiram has been widely used for fruits, vegetables and mature crops to control various fungal diseases; however, the thiram residues in the environment pose a serious threat to human health. In this work, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) [...] Read more.
As an important sort of dithiocarbamate bactericide, thiram has been widely used for fruits, vegetables and mature crops to control various fungal diseases; however, the thiram residues in the environment pose a serious threat to human health. In this work, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were grown in-situ on cotton swab (CS) surfaces, based on the mussel-inspired polydopamine (PDA) molecule and designed as highly sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) swabs for the conformal rapid detection of bactericide residues. With this strategy, the obtained CS@PDA@AgNPs swabs demonstrated highly sensitive and reproducible Raman signals toward Nile blue A (NBA) probe molecules, and the detection limit was as low as 1.0 × 10−10 M. More critically, these CS@PDA@AgNPs swabs could be served as flexible SERS substrates for the conformal rapid detection of thiram bactericides from various fruit surfaces through a simple swabbing approach. The results showed that the detection limit of thiram residues from pear, grape and peach surfaces was approximately down to the level of 0.12 ng/cm2, 0.24 ng/cm2 and 0.15 ng/cm2 respectively, demonstrating a high sensitivity and excellent reliability toward dithiocarbamate bactericides. Not only could these SERS swabs significantly promote the collection efficiency of thiram residues from irregular shaped matrices, but they could also greatly enhance the analytical sensitivity and reliability, and would have great potential for the on-site detection of residual bactericides in the environment and in bioscience fields. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy in Nano-World)
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9 pages, 1585 KiB  
Article
Highly Sensitive and Selective Nanogap-Enhanced SERS Sensing Platform
by ChaeWon Mun, Vo Thi Nhat Linh, Jung-Dae Kwon, Ho Sang Jung, Dong-Ho Kim and Sung-Gyu Park
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(4), 619; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9040619 - 16 Apr 2019
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3229
Abstract
This paper reports a highly sensitive and selective surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) sensing platform. We used a simple fabrication method to generate plasmonic hotspots through a direct maskless plasma etching of a polymer surface and the surface tension-driven assembly of high aspect ratio [...] Read more.
This paper reports a highly sensitive and selective surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) sensing platform. We used a simple fabrication method to generate plasmonic hotspots through a direct maskless plasma etching of a polymer surface and the surface tension-driven assembly of high aspect ratio Ag/polymer nanopillars. These collapsed plasmonic nanopillars produced an enhanced near-field interaction via coupled localized surface plasmon resonance. The high density of the small nanogaps yielded a high plasmonic detection performance, with an average SERS enhancement factor of 1.5 × 107. More importantly, we demonstrated that the encapsulation of plasmonic nanostructures within nanofiltration membranes allowed the selective filtration of small molecules based on the degree of membrane swelling in organic solvents and molecular size. Nanofiltration membrane-encapsulated SERS substrates do not require pretreatments. Therefore, they provide a simple and fast detection of toxic molecules using portable Raman spectroscopy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy in Nano-World)
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12 pages, 2576 KiB  
Article
Immobilization and 3D Hot-Junction Formation of Gold Nanoparticles on Two-Dimensional Silicate Nanoplatelets as Substrates for High-Efficiency Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Detection
by Yen-Chen Lee and Chih-Wei Chiu
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(3), 324; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9030324 - 01 Mar 2019
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 3367
Abstract
We synthesize a high-efficiency substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurements, which is composed of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on two-dimensional silicate nanoplatelets acting as an inorganic stabilizer, via the in-situ reduction of hydrogen tetrachloroaurate (III) by sodium citrate in an aqueous solution. Silicate [...] Read more.
We synthesize a high-efficiency substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurements, which is composed of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on two-dimensional silicate nanoplatelets acting as an inorganic stabilizer, via the in-situ reduction of hydrogen tetrachloroaurate (III) by sodium citrate in an aqueous solution. Silicate platelets of ~1-nm thickness and various sizes, viz. laponite (50 nm), sodium montmorillonite (Na+–MMT, 100 nm), and mica (500 nm), are used to stabilize the AuNPs (Au@silicate), which are formed with uniform diameters ranging between 25 and 30 nm as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In particular, the laponite SERS substrate can be used in biological, environmental, and food safety applications to measure small molecules such as DNA (adenine molecule), dye (Direct Blue), and herbicide (paraquat) as it shows high detection sensitivity with a detection limit of 10−9 M for adenine detection. These highly sensitive SERS substrates, with their three-dimensional hot-junctions formed with AuNPs and two-dimensional silicate nanoplatelets, allow the highly efficient detection of organic molecules. Therefore, these Au@silicate nanohybrid substrates have great potential in biosensor technology because of their environmentally-friendly and simple fabrication process, high efficiency, and the possibility of rapid detection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy in Nano-World)
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10 pages, 1826 KiB  
Article
Investigation of the Microstructures of Graphene Quantum Dots (GQDs) by Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy
by Junxiao Wu, Peijie Wang, Fuhe Wang and Yan Fang
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(10), 864; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8100864 - 22 Oct 2018
Cited by 84 | Viewed by 6541
Abstract
Photoluminescence (PL) is the most significant feature of graphene quantum dots (GQDs). However, the PL mechanism in GQDs has been debated due to the fact that the microstructures, such as edge and in-plane defects that are critical for PL emission, have not been [...] Read more.
Photoluminescence (PL) is the most significant feature of graphene quantum dots (GQDs). However, the PL mechanism in GQDs has been debated due to the fact that the microstructures, such as edge and in-plane defects that are critical for PL emission, have not been convincingly identified due to the lack of effective detection methods. Conventional measures such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy only show some localized lattice fringes of GQDs and the structures of some substituents, which have little significance in terms of thoroughly understanding the PL effect. Here, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was introduced as a highly sensitive surface technique to study the microstructures of GQDs. Pure GQDs were prepared by laser ablating and cutting highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) parallel to the graphite layers. Consequently, abundant SERS signals of the GQDs were obtained on an Ag electrode in an electrochemical environment for the first time. The results convincingly and experimentally characterized the typical and detailed features of GQDs, such as the crystallinity of sp2 hexagons, the quantum confinement effect, various defects on the edges, sp3-like defects and disorders on the basal planes, and passivated structures on the periphery and surface of the GQDs. This work demonstrates that SERS is thus by far the most effective technique for probing the microstructures of GQDs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy in Nano-World)
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