Advances in Nanomedicine Biotechnologies

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Biology and Medicines".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2024) | Viewed by 5528

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Researchers and pioneers in the field of nanomedicine biotechnologies are invited to contribute to a Special Issue of Nanomaterials on "Advances in Nanomedicine Biotechnologies". This provides an exciting opportunity to highlight the most recent discoveries and ideas at the nexus of nanotechnology and medicine. We are looking for high-impact publications that explore the revolutionary potential of nanomedicine in fields including drug delivery systems, anti-cancer and anti-infective therapies, creative treatments for metabolic disorders, neurodegenerative illnesses, and biosensors. At the nanoscale, the emphasis is on smoothly merging biology and medicine. This Special Issue offers a forum for the dissemination of ground-breaking findings across an international readership, providing researchers the chance to join a thriving community that pushes the limits of cell biology, biomedical engineering, and nanotechnology and make a huge impact on the field. Individuals are encouraged to contribute original research, reviews, and viewpoints that are at the forefront of nanomaterials research. This will allow us to work together to transform patient care and pave the way for a healthy future.

Prof. Dr. Rúben Fernandes
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanobiosystems for targeted drug delivery
  • advances in anti-cancer nanotherapies
  • novel approaches for anti-infective nanomedicine
  • innovative nanotherapies for neurodegenerative disorders
  • nanomedicine strategies for metabolic disorder management
  • development of biosensors for biomedical applications
  • point-of-care diagnostics using nanomaterials
  • nanotechnology-enabled regenerative medicine
  • biocompatible nanomaterials for tissue engineering
  • nanoparticles for controlled release and sustained drug delivery

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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29 pages, 5832 KiB  
Article
Three-Dimensional-Printed GelMA-KerMA Composite Patches as an Innovative Platform for Potential Tissue Engineering of Tympanic Membrane Perforations
by Tuba Bedir, Dilruba Baykara, Ridvan Yildirim, Ayse Ceren Calikoglu Koyuncu, Ali Sahin, Elif Kaya, Gulgun Bosgelmez Tinaz, Mert Akin Insel, Murat Topuzogulları, Oguzhan Gunduz, Cem Bulent Ustundag and Roger Narayan
Nanomaterials 2024, 14(7), 563; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano14070563 - 23 Mar 2024
Viewed by 783
Abstract
Tympanic membrane (TM) perforations, primarily induced by middle ear infections, the introduction of foreign objects into the ear, and acoustic trauma, lead to hearing abnormalities and ear infections. We describe the design and fabrication of a novel composite patch containing photocrosslinkable gelatin methacryloyl [...] Read more.
Tympanic membrane (TM) perforations, primarily induced by middle ear infections, the introduction of foreign objects into the ear, and acoustic trauma, lead to hearing abnormalities and ear infections. We describe the design and fabrication of a novel composite patch containing photocrosslinkable gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) and keratin methacryloyl (KerMA) hydrogels. GelMA-KerMA patches containing conical microneedles in their design were developed using the digital light processing (DLP) 3D printing approach. Following this, the patches were biofunctionalized by applying a coaxial coating with PVA nanoparticles loaded with gentamicin (GEN) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) with the Electrohydrodynamic Atomization (EHDA) method. The developed nanoparticle-coated 3D-printed patches were evaluated in terms of their chemical, morphological, mechanical, swelling, and degradation behavior. In addition, the GEN and FGF-2 release profiles, antimicrobial properties, and biocompatibility of the patches were examined in vitro. The morphological assessment verified the successful fabrication and nanoparticle coating of the 3D-printed GelMA-KerMA patches. The outcomes of antibacterial tests demonstrated that GEN@PVA/GelMA-KerMA patches exhibited substantial antibacterial efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli. Furthermore, cell culture studies revealed that GelMA-KerMA patches were biocompatible with human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSC) and supported cell attachment and proliferation without any cytotoxicity. These findings indicated that biofunctional 3D-printed GelMA-KerMA patches have the potential to be a promising therapeutic approach for addressing TM perforations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nanomedicine Biotechnologies)
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10 pages, 3064 KiB  
Article
Oxidative Stress and Acrosomal Status of Human Spermatozoa Subjected to Hydrophobic Carbon Soot Treatments
by Karekin D. Esmeryan, Ivaylo Rangelov and Todor A. Chaushev
Nanomaterials 2024, 14(5), 395; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano14050395 - 21 Feb 2024
Viewed by 630
Abstract
The fourth industrial revolution extensively reshapes the reality we are living in by blurring the boundaries of physical, digital and biological worlds. A good example is the previously unthinkable incursion of nanoscale waste materials, such as soot, into the technologies for assisted reproduction. [...] Read more.
The fourth industrial revolution extensively reshapes the reality we are living in by blurring the boundaries of physical, digital and biological worlds. A good example is the previously unthinkable incursion of nanoscale waste materials, such as soot, into the technologies for assisted reproduction. Although the rapeseed oil soot may efficiently enhance the progressive motility of human spermatozoa, it is yet unknown whether this material induces undesirable oxidative stress and premature acrosome reaction, endangering the sperm-oocyte fusion and blastocyst formation. In an attempt to clarify this issue, we reveal that the three-hour incubation of human semen mixed with three main types of soot does not cause oxidative stress and spontaneous acrosome reaction of the sperm. These unique findings are attributed to synchronous elimination and stabilization of the oxidants via hydrogen bonding to the acidic groups of the soot (i.e., C=O and/or C-O-C) and electron donation by its basic chemical sites (i.e., C-OH and/or COOH). Moreover, the soot nanoparticles are electrostatically attracted by discrete positively charged areas on the sperm head, increasing its negative charge and in some cases interfering the acrosome reaction. Such novel mechanistic insights emphasize the credibility of rapeseed oil soot to confidently shift from the purely diagnostic and therapeutic phases in reproductive medicine to research dealing with the effect of carbon nanomaterials on the embryo development and implantation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nanomedicine Biotechnologies)
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25 pages, 13525 KiB  
Article
Resveratrol/Selenium Nanocomposite with Antioxidative and Antibacterial Properties
by Nina Tomić, Magdalena M. Stevanović, Nenad Filipović, Tea Ganić, Biljana Nikolić, Ina Gajić and Dragana Mitić Ćulafić
Nanomaterials 2024, 14(4), 368; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano14040368 - 16 Feb 2024
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Abstract
In this work, we synthesized a new composite material comprised of previously formulated resveratrol nanobelt-like particles (ResNPs) and selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs), namely ResSeNPs. Characterization was provided by FESEM and optical microscopy, as well as by UV-Vis and FTIR spectroscopy, the last showing hydrogen [...] Read more.
In this work, we synthesized a new composite material comprised of previously formulated resveratrol nanobelt-like particles (ResNPs) and selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs), namely ResSeNPs. Characterization was provided by FESEM and optical microscopy, as well as by UV-Vis and FTIR spectroscopy, the last showing hydrogen bonds between ResNPs and SeNPs. DPPH, TBA, and FRAP assays showed excellent antioxidative abilities with ResNPs and SeNPs contributing mainly to lipid peroxidation inhibition and reducing/scavenging activity, respectively. The antibacterial effect against common medicinal implant colonizers pointed to notably higher activity against Staphylococcus isolates (minimal inhibitory concentrations 0.75–1.5%) compared to tested gram-negative species (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Antibiofilm activity against S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and P. aeruginosa determined in a crystal violet assay was promising (up to 69%), but monitoring of selected biofilm-related gene expression (pelA and algD) indicated the necessity of the involvement of a larger number of genes in the analysis in order to further establish the underlying mechanism. Although biocompatibility screening showed some cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in MTT and alkaline comet assays, respectively, it is important to note that active antioxidative and antibacterial/antibiofilm concentrations were non-cytotoxic and non-genotoxic in normal MRC-5 cells. These results encourage further composite improvements and investigation in order to adapt it for specific biomedical purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nanomedicine Biotechnologies)
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30 pages, 7860 KiB  
Article
Elaboration of Nanostructured Levan-Based Colloid System as a Biological Alternative with Antimicrobial Activity for Applications in the Management of Pathogenic Microorganisms
by Vitalijs Radenkovs, Anda Valdovska, Daiga Galina, Stefan Cairns, Dmitrijs Jakovlevs, Sergejs Gaidukovs, Ingmars Cinkmanis and Karina Juhnevica-Radenkova
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(22), 2969; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13222969 - 17 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1089
Abstract
Considering the documented health benefits of bacterial exopolysaccharides (EPSs), specifically of bacterial levan (BL), including its intrinsic antimicrobial activity against certain pathogenic species, the current study concentrated on the development of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in the form of colloid systems (CoSs) containing [...] Read more.
Considering the documented health benefits of bacterial exopolysaccharides (EPSs), specifically of bacterial levan (BL), including its intrinsic antimicrobial activity against certain pathogenic species, the current study concentrated on the development of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in the form of colloid systems (CoSs) containing silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) employing in-house biosynthesized BL as a reducing and capping agent. The established protocol of fermentation conditions implicating two species of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), i.e., Streptococcus salivarius K12 and Leuconostoc mesenteroides DSM 20343, ensured a yield of up to 25.7 and 13.7 g L−1 of BL within 72 h, respectively. An analytical approach accomplished by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy allowed for the verification of structural features attributed to biosynthesized BL. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed the crystalline morphology of biosynthesized BL with a smooth and glossy surface and highly porous structure. Molecular weight (Mw) estimated by multi-detector size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) indicated that BL biosynthesized using S. salivarius K12 has an impressively high Mw, corresponding to 15.435 × 104 kilodaltons (kDa). In turn, BL isolated from L. mesenteroides DSM 20343 was found to have an Mw of only 26.6 kDa. Polydispersity index estimation (PD = Mw/Mn) of produced BL displayed a monodispersed molecule isolated from S. salivarius K12, corresponding to 1.08, while this was 2.17 for L. mesenteroides DSM 20343 isolate. The presence of fructose as the main backbone and, to a lesser extent, glucose and galactose as side chain molecules in EPS hydrolysates was supported by HPLC-RID detection. In producing CoS-BL@AgNPs within green biosynthesis, the presence of nanostructured objects with a size distribution from 12.67 ± 5.56 nm to 46.97 ± 20.23 was confirmed by SEM and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The prominent inhibitory potency of elaborated CoS-BL@AgNPs against both reference test cultures, i.e., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus and those of clinical origin with multi-drug resistance (MDR), was confirmed by disc and well diffusion tests and supported by the values of the minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations. CoS-BL@AgNPs can be treated as APIs suitable for designing new antimicrobial agents and modifying therapies in controlling MDR pathogens. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nanomedicine Biotechnologies)
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17 pages, 23985 KiB  
Article
Synthesis of Titanium Oxide Nanotubes Loaded with Hydroxyapatite
by Elinor Zadkani Nahum, Alex Lugovskoy, Svetlana Lugovskoy and Alexander Sobolev
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(20), 2743; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13202743 - 11 Oct 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1168
Abstract
A simple method of synthesis of TiO2 nanotubes (TiNT) loaded with hydroxyapatite (HAP) is described. Such nanotubes find wide applications in various fields, including biomedicine, solar cells, and drug delivery, due to their bioactivity and potential for osseointegration. The Cp-Ti substrate was [...] Read more.
A simple method of synthesis of TiO2 nanotubes (TiNT) loaded with hydroxyapatite (HAP) is described. Such nanotubes find wide applications in various fields, including biomedicine, solar cells, and drug delivery, due to their bioactivity and potential for osseointegration. The Cp-Ti substrate was anodized at a constant voltage of 40 V, with the subsequent heat treatment at 450 °C. The resulting TiNT had a diameter of 100.3 ± 2.8 nm and a length of 3.5 ± 0.04 μm. The best result of the growth rate of HAP in Hanks’ balanced salt solution (Hanks’ BSS) was obtained in calcium glycerophosphate (CG = 0.1 g/L) when precipitates formed on the bottom and walls of the nanotubes. Structural properties, surface wettability, corrosion resistance, and growth rate of HAP as an indicator of the bioactivity of the coating have been studied. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), potentiodynamic polarization test (PPC), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and contact angle (CA) measurements were used to characterize HAP-loaded nanotubes (HAP-TiNT). The CA, also serving as an indirect indicator of bioactivity, was 30.4 ± 1.1° for the TiNT not containing HAP. The contact angle value for HAP-TiNT produced in 0.1 g/L CG was 18.2 ± 1.2°, and for HAP-TiNT exposed to Hanks’ BSS for 7 days, the CA was 7.2 ± 0.5°. The corrosion studies and measurement of HAP growth rates after a 7-day exposure to Hanks’ BSS confirmed the result that TiNT processed in 0.1 g/L of CG exhibited the most significant capacity for HAP formation compared to the other tested samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nanomedicine Biotechnologies)
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Review

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22 pages, 2368 KiB  
Review
Current Advances of Nanomaterial-Based Oral Drug Delivery for Colorectal Cancer Treatment
by Nuoya Wang, Liqing Chen, Wei Huang, Zhonggao Gao and Mingji Jin
Nanomaterials 2024, 14(7), 557; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano14070557 - 22 Mar 2024
Viewed by 791
Abstract
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common malignant tumor, and traditional treatments include surgical resection and radiotherapy. However, local recurrence, distal metastasis, and intestinal obstruction are significant problems. Oral nano-formulation is a promising treatment strategy for CRC. This study introduces physiological and environmental factors, [...] Read more.
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common malignant tumor, and traditional treatments include surgical resection and radiotherapy. However, local recurrence, distal metastasis, and intestinal obstruction are significant problems. Oral nano-formulation is a promising treatment strategy for CRC. This study introduces physiological and environmental factors, the main challenges of CRC treatment, and the need for a novel oral colon-targeted drug delivery system (OCDDS). This study reviews the research progress of controlled-release, responsive, magnetic, targeted, and other oral nano-formulations in the direction of CRC treatment, in addition to the advantages of oral colon-targeted nano-formulations and concerns about the oral delivery of related therapeutic agents to inspire related research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nanomedicine Biotechnologies)
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