Functional Nanocomposites: From Strategic Design to Applications

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanocomposite Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 May 2024 | Viewed by 2006

Special Issue Editors

Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH 45469, USA
Interests: interdisciplinary research in the fields of materials engineering, additive manufacturing, physics, optics, energy science, chemistry, biology, nanoscience and nanotechnology; optical, electrical, thermal, magnetic, and mechanical properties; analysis and applications of various advanced nanomaterials and composites
Department of Natural Sciences, Northwest Missouri State University, Maryville, MO 64468, USA
Interests: fluorescent carbon-based nanomaterials; carbon- and boron-based nanomaterials as multifunctional modifiers for polymers; nanomaterial engineering for hydrogen storage and combustion
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Nanocomposites are advanced composites that include nanomaterials to improve properties for various applications. They are low-dimensional materials having one-, two-, or three-dimensional confinements, and possess superior optical, electronic, magnetic, thermal, or mechanical properties compared to their bulk material counterparts. The intriguing properties of nanomaterials continue to attract broad attention for developing new advanced materials with improved properties, further stimulating the research and development of functional nanocomposites. In this special issue, original research and review articles on developing functional nanocomposites for novel applications are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Development of nanocomposites with 0D nanomaterials (such as nanoparticles) and applications
  • Development of nanocomposites with 1D nanomaterials (such as nanowires, nanotubes, nanorods, etc.) and applications
  • Development of nanocomposites with 2D nanomaterials (such as nanosheets) and applications
  • Theoretical simulations and modeling of design, fabrication, properties, mechanisms, as well as applications for advanced functional nanocomposites
  • Review articles involving functional nanocomposites and their applications

Dr. Li Cao
Prof. Dr. Mohammed Jaouad Meziani
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • nanocomposites
  • nanoparticles
  • nanotubes
  • nanowires
  • nanorods
  • nanosheets

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 6692 KiB  
Article
Comparative Evaluation of TiO2 Nanoparticle Addition and Postcuring Time on the Flexural Properties and Hardness of Additively Fabricated Denture Base Resins
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(23), 3061; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13233061 - 30 Nov 2023
Viewed by 731
Abstract
Three-dimensionally (3D)-printed fabricated denture bases have shown inferior strength to conventional and subtractively fabricated ones. Several factors could significantly improve the strength of 3D-printed denture base resin, including the addition of nanoparticles and post-curing factors. This study evaluated the effect of TiO2 [...] Read more.
Three-dimensionally (3D)-printed fabricated denture bases have shown inferior strength to conventional and subtractively fabricated ones. Several factors could significantly improve the strength of 3D-printed denture base resin, including the addition of nanoparticles and post-curing factors. This study evaluated the effect of TiO2 nanoparticle (TNP) addition and the post-curing time (PCT) on the flexural properties and hardness of three-dimensionally (3D)-printed denture base resins. A total of 360 specimens were fabricated, with 180 specimens from each type of resin. For evaluating the flexural properties, bar-shaped specimens measuring 64 × 10 × 3.3 mm were used, while, for the hardness testing, disc-shaped specimens measuring 15 × 2 mm were employed. The two 3D-printed resins utilized in this study were Asiga (DentaBASE) and NextDent (Vertex Dental B.V). Each resin was modified by adding TNPs at 1% and 2% concentrations, forming two groups and an additional unmodified group. Each group was divided into three subgroups according to the PCT (15, 60, and 90 min). All the specimens were subjected to artificial aging (5000 cycles), followed by testing of the flexural strength and elastic modulus using a universal testing machine, and the hardness using the Vickers hardness test. A three-way ANOVA was used for the data analysis, and a post hoc Tukey’s test was used for the pairwise comparisons (α = 0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used for the fracture surface analysis. The addition of the TNPs increased the flexural strength in comparison to the unmodified groups (p < 0.001), while there was no significant difference in the elastic modulus and hardness with the 1% TNP concentration. Among the TNP groups, the 2% TNP concentration significantly decreased the elastic modulus and hardness (p < 0.001). The SEM showed a homogenous distribution of the TNPs, and the more irregular fracture surface displayed ductile fractures. The PCT significantly increased the flexural strength, elastic modulus, and hardness (p < 0.001), and this increase was time-dependent. The three-way ANOVA results revealed a significant difference between the material types, TNP concentrations, and PCT interactions (p < 0.001). Both concentrations of the TNPs increased the flexural strength, while the 2% TNP concentration decreased the elastic modulus and hardness of the 3D-printed nanocomposites. The flexural strength and hardness increased as the PCT increased. The material type, TNP concentration, and PCT are important factors that affect the strength of 3D-printed nanocomposites and could improve their mechanical performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Nanocomposites: From Strategic Design to Applications)
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24 pages, 5890 KiB  
Article
Self-Healing Iron Oxide Polyelectrolyte Nanocomposites: Influence of Particle Agglomeration and Water on Mechanical Properties
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(23), 2983; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13232983 - 21 Nov 2023
Viewed by 816
Abstract
Self-healing nanocomposites can be generated by organic functionalization of inorganic nanoparticles and complementary functionalization of the polymer matrix, allowing reversible interactions between the two components. Here, we report on self-healing nanocomposites based on ionic interactions between anionic copolymers consisting of di(ethylene glycol) methyl [...] Read more.
Self-healing nanocomposites can be generated by organic functionalization of inorganic nanoparticles and complementary functionalization of the polymer matrix, allowing reversible interactions between the two components. Here, we report on self-healing nanocomposites based on ionic interactions between anionic copolymers consisting of di(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate, sodium 4-(methacryloyloxy)butan-1-sulfonate, and cationically functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles. The materials exhibited hygroscopic behavior. At water contents < 6%, the shear modulus was reduced by up to 90%. The nanoparticle concentration was identified as a second factor strongly influencing the mechanical properties of the materials. Backscattered scanning electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering measurements showed the formation of agglomerates in the size range of 100 nm to a few µm in diameter, independent of concentration, resulting in the disordering of the semi-crystalline ionic polymer blocks. These effects resulted in an increase in the shear modulus of the composite from 3.7 MPa to 5.6 MPa, 6.3 Mpa, and 7.5 MPa for 2, 10, and 20 wt% particles, respectively. Temperature-induced self-healing was possible for all composites investigated. However, only 36% of the maximum stress could be recovered in systems with a low nanoparticle content, whereas the original properties were largely restored (>85%) at higher particle contents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Nanocomposites: From Strategic Design to Applications)
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