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Nanotechnology: Engineering the Future of Medicine

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 July 2023) | Viewed by 32241

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Universidade do Porto, Rua Alfredo Allen, 208, 4200-135 Porto
Interests: materials science and engineering; nanotechnology; biomedicine; cancer; in vivo animal models

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Guest Editor
Biomaterials and Biomedical Technology Lab, CBQF – Centro de Biotecnologia e Química Fina, Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Católica Portuguesa, 4169-005 Porto, Portugal
Interests: biopolymers; silk-based biomaterials; wound healing and regeneration; sterilization of sensitive biomedical polymers
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanotechnology has revolutionized the biomedical field. When the right tools were invented, such as scanning electron and atomic force microscopes, scientists were able to make observations at the nanoscale. With that knowledge, a new range of biomaterials emerged, such as nanoparticles and liposomes. These can be combined with drugs or diagnostic molecules to improve the ability to target specific cells or tissues and can be used as delivery systems and probes for biological diagnostics, imaging, and therapeutics. Different cells have distinctive properties, and nanotechnology can be used to recognize cells of interest, allowing associated drugs and therapeutics to reach diseased tissue, circumventing healthy cells. Nanomaterials can be functionalized with specific molecules that will bind cellular receptors for targeted delivery.

The applicability of nanotechnology in biomedicine is broad. It can be used in cancer using nanoparticles or liposomes carrying potential cancer drugs to specific cancers; in regenerative medicine using nanomaterials-assisted gene delivery to stem cells or nanostructured materials employing patients own´s cells; and in inflammatory disorders using passive targeting due to the small size and different surface properties passing through blood vessel walls into tissues.

This Special Issue aims to cover recent research on nanotechnology applied to biomedicine. Different medical applications can be endorsed, as well as diverse types of nanostructures. Types of contributions can be original research papers, short communications, and reviews.

Dr. Ana Rita Costa-Pinto
Dr. Ana Leite Oliveira
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanoparticles 
  • Nanomedicine 
  • Biomedicine 
  • Nanotechnology 
  • Theranostics 
  • Targeted delivery systems

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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22 pages, 6126 KiB  
Article
Continuous Production of Highly Tuned Silk/Calcium-Based Composites: Exploring New Pathways for Skin Regeneration
by Anabela Veiga, Rui Magalhães, Marta M. Duarte, Juliana R. Dias, Nuno M. Alves, Ana Rita Costa-Pinto, Filipa Castro, Fernando Rocha and Ana L. Oliveira
Molecules 2022, 27(7), 2249; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27072249 - 30 Mar 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1643
Abstract
Calcium plays an important role in barrier function repair and skin homeostasis. In particular, calcium phosphates (CaPs) are well established materials for biomedical engineering due to their biocompatibility. To generate biomaterials with a more complete set of biological properties, previously discarded silk sericin [...] Read more.
Calcium plays an important role in barrier function repair and skin homeostasis. In particular, calcium phosphates (CaPs) are well established materials for biomedical engineering due to their biocompatibility. To generate biomaterials with a more complete set of biological properties, previously discarded silk sericin (SS) has been recovered and used as a template to grow CaPs. Crucial characteristics for skin applications, such as antibacterial activity, can be further enhanced by doping CaPs with cerium (Ce) ions. The effectiveness of cell attachment and growth on the materials highly depends on their morphology, particle size distribution, and chemical composition. These characteristics can be tailored through the application of oscillatory flow technology, which provides precise mixing control of the reaction medium. Thus, in the present work, CaP/SS and CaP/SS/Ce particles were fabricated for the first time using a modular oscillatory flow plate reactor (MOFPR) in a continuous mode. Furthermore, the biological behavior of both these composites and of previously produced pure CaPs was assessed using human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). It was demonstrated that both CaP based with plate-shaped nanoparticles and CaP-SS-based composites significantly improved cell viability and proliferation over time. The results obtained represent a first step towards the reinvention of CaPs for skin engineering. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanotechnology: Engineering the Future of Medicine)
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Review

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45 pages, 14612 KiB  
Review
Controlled Drug Delivery Systems: Current Status and Future Directions
by Shivakalyani Adepu and Seeram Ramakrishna
Molecules 2021, 26(19), 5905; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26195905 - 29 Sep 2021
Cited by 368 | Viewed by 29580
Abstract
The drug delivery system enables the release of the active pharmaceutical ingredient to achieve a desired therapeutic response. Conventional drug delivery systems (tablets, capsules, syrups, ointments, etc.) suffer from poor bioavailability and fluctuations in plasma drug level and are unable to achieve sustained [...] Read more.
The drug delivery system enables the release of the active pharmaceutical ingredient to achieve a desired therapeutic response. Conventional drug delivery systems (tablets, capsules, syrups, ointments, etc.) suffer from poor bioavailability and fluctuations in plasma drug level and are unable to achieve sustained release. Without an efficient delivery mechanism, the whole therapeutic process can be rendered useless. Moreover, the drug has to be delivered at a specified controlled rate and at the target site as precisely as possible to achieve maximum efficacy and safety. Controlled drug delivery systems are developed to combat the problems associated with conventional drug delivery. There has been a tremendous evolution in controlled drug delivery systems from the past two decades ranging from macro scale and nano scale to intelligent targeted delivery. The initial part of this review provides a basic understanding of drug delivery systems with an emphasis on the pharmacokinetics of the drug. It also discusses the conventional drug delivery systems and their limitations. Further, controlled drug delivery systems are discussed in detail with the design considerations, classifications and drawings. In addition, nano-drug delivery, targeted and smart drug delivery using stimuli-responsive and intelligent biomaterials is discussed with recent key findings. The paper concludes with the challenges faced and future directions in controlled drug delivery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanotechnology: Engineering the Future of Medicine)
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