Petrology, Geochemistry, Geophysics, Modeling and Mapping of Volcanic/Igneous Reservoirs and Analog Volcanoes

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Mineral Exploration Methods and Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 5158

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Key Laboratory for Evolution of Past Life and Environment in Northeast Asia, Jilin University, Ministry of Education, Changchun 130026, China
2. College of Earth Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130061, China
Interests: petrology; sedimentology; volcanology; geochemistry; tectonics; petroleum geology

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Guest Editor
College of Earth Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130061, China
Interests: petroleum geology; volcanology

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi 43600, Selangor, Malaysia
Interests: geophysics; rock physics; geomechanics; CO2 sequestration

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Guest Editor
College of Geo-Exploration Science and Technology, Jilin University, Changchun 130026, China
Interests: signal processing of ground-penetrating radar (GPR); joint inversion of GPR and seismic exploration; nonlinear elasticity of rocks
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Igneous reservoirs are widely distributed globally and have been attractive targets for oil and gas exploration, especially in the deep successions of sedimentary basins. Generally speaking, all types of lithologies have the potential to contain oil and gas. However, the normal case in specific practice during petroleum exploration is that only a few of them have been proved to be effective reservoirs for oil and gas.

Igneous rocks including volcanic and intrusive ones commonly show significant differences in their reservoir characteristics. Volcanic rocks will generally develop primary pores such as vesicles and gas pipes because of degassing during eruption. Secondary pores of different origin are pervasive in igneous rocks, which can be formed during weathering, burial diagenesis, fluid alteration and structural deformation. Pore spaces are the results of rock forming and changing processes to which rock composition and structure are causally related. Facies architecture commonly controls the distribution pattern of reservoir spaces in igneous rocks. As typical allostrotigraphic units, igneous reservoir bodies are mainly massive or pseudostratified. They are significantly different from sedimentary ones. Special methods and techniques are needed in igneous reservoir delineation and exploration concerning petrological, geochemical and geophysical investigations.

Description of buried volcanoes can be well constrained by multiple borehole and seismic data in many cases in petroliferous sedimentary basins. On the other hand, volcanoes modern and ancient exposed on the ground can be viewed in three dimensions. Many of the volcanoes outcropped on a basin margin are actually counterparts of the buried ones in the basin. Volcanology study on the volcanoes related to petroliferous basins has proved to be an effective approach to igneous reservoir exploration. Great progress has been made in igneous oil and gas exploration in recent years in China and other countries. Valuable information and successful experience have been accumulated during this period. Sharing these experiences and lessons in a timely manner contributes to scientific and technological progress. In order to summarize the theoretical progress of igneous reservoirs based on the exploration practice, and point out further potential key research issues in the future. In this Special Issue, we seek contributions on (1) volcanic/igneous reservoirs; (2) analog volcanoes related to buried volcanoes in sedimentary basins; (3) method and technique in petrology, geochemistry and geophysics related to volcanic/igneous reservoirs.

The Special Issue is organized into three sections:

  • Section 1: volcanology of outcropping and buried volcanoes;
  • Section 2: petrology, geochemistry, and geophysics of volcanic/igneous reservoirs;
  • Section 3: volcanostratigraphy, modelling, and mapping.

Prof. Dr. Pujun Wang
Prof. Dr. Huafeng Tang
Dr. Thian Lai Goh
Prof. Dr. Xuan Feng
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • reservoir classification
  • reservoir characterization
  • reservoir exploration
  • reservoir inversion
  • reservoir space
  • facies architecture
  • petrophysics
  • volcanology
  • volcanostratigraphy
  • modelling
  • mapping

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

24 pages, 6541 KiB  
Article
Provenance of Volcanogenic Deposits from the Shanxi Formation of the Daniudi Gas Field, Ordos Basin, and Its Tectonic Implications
by Xuejiao Qu, Qiao Wang, Dunfan Wang, Tao Lei, Hao Chen, Jia Wang, Wei Jiang, Wei Zhang, Long Luo, Jianping Liu, Nan Jiang, Xuanbo Gao and Xianfeng Tan
Minerals 2023, 13(12), 1546; https://doi.org/10.3390/min13121546 - 14 Dec 2023
Viewed by 804
Abstract
Through detailed drill-core description, petrography, cathodoluminescence imaging, and geochemistry analysis, sedimentary deposits with a high content of volcanogenic components (27.6%) were discovered in the Shanxi Formation of the Daniudi Gas Field, Ordos Basin. The volcanogenic components include volcanogenic quartz, lava fragments (dominated by [...] Read more.
Through detailed drill-core description, petrography, cathodoluminescence imaging, and geochemistry analysis, sedimentary deposits with a high content of volcanogenic components (27.6%) were discovered in the Shanxi Formation of the Daniudi Gas Field, Ordos Basin. The volcanogenic components include volcanogenic quartz, lava fragments (dominated by rhyolite fragments), tuff fragments, and tuffaceous matrix. In addition, at least two volcanic ash layers were discovered. Although the metamorphic rocks of the Precambrian succession in the ancient land of Yin Mountain are usually considered the primary source of the Shanxi formation, it is most likely that the volcanogenic components were derived from intermediate-acid volcanic materials that accumulated in the Daqingshan area during the Late Carboniferous to Early Permian. Those volcanogenic components are mainly transported by flowing water rather than by air from origin to basin. In addition, the accumulation of volcanic materials in the Daqingshan area was controlled by volcanic eruptions occurring solely in this area, rather than by the Inner Mongolia Orogenic Belt. Those volcanic eruptions were related to the southward subduction of the Paleo-Asian Ocean Plate beneath the northern margin of the North China Plate in the Late Carboniferous to Early Permian. The active continental margin related to the subduction of the Paleo-Asian Ocean Plate lasted at least until the Early Permian, and the closure of the Paleo-Asian Ocean must have occurred later than the Early Permian. Full article
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18 pages, 7218 KiB  
Article
Vesicles and Reservoirs of Basic Lava Flows in the Laoheishan and Huoshaoshan Volcanoes, NE China
by Guochao Lu, Huafeng Tang, Qingbin Wang, Liying Yang, Jingsong Hu, Haichao Wu, Jiawei Bai and Zhiwen Tian
Minerals 2023, 13(11), 1434; https://doi.org/10.3390/min13111434 - 12 Nov 2023
Viewed by 891
Abstract
As an important part of the lava flow reservoir, vesicles affect reservoir performance to some extent. To explore the distribution, origins and importance of vesicles in different facies belts of basic lava flows. In this study, we selected representative field outcrops and samples [...] Read more.
As an important part of the lava flow reservoir, vesicles affect reservoir performance to some extent. To explore the distribution, origins and importance of vesicles in different facies belts of basic lava flows. In this study, we selected representative field outcrops and samples from different facies belts of the Laoheishan and Huoshaoshan lava flows in the Wudalianchi volcanics, Heilongjiang Province, identified and examined vesicles, measured their porosity and permeability, and analyzed their surface porosity. Three facies belts of vesicle shape, size, quantity, arrangement, origin, and connectivity between vesicles and fractures were identified. The results showed that the vesicles in the crater–near-crater belt were ellipsoidal and spherical, with many vesicles. The vesicles in the proximal belt were dominated by many ellipsoids with a uniform distribution. The vesicles in the distal belt were dominated by spherical and ellipsoidal vesicles, with a few tubular vesicles and a small number of vesicles. The findings suggest that the crater-near-crater belt and proximal belt have the best reservoir performance, whereas the distal belt has the worst. Full article
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18 pages, 3923 KiB  
Article
Petrophysical Acoustic Characterization of Weathered Granite: A Case Study of Mesozoic Granites in the Coastal Area of Fujian Province, China
by Zhiwen Tian, Jinshui Liu, Huafeng Tang, Wenrui Ma, Peng Tao, Zhe Dong and Jingsong Hu
Minerals 2023, 13(4), 514; https://doi.org/10.3390/min13040514 - 6 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1176
Abstract
In recent years, with the exploration and development of granite buried-hill oil and gas reservoirs, petrophysics research has played an important role in the study of reservoir characteristics and fluid identification. Through analysis of the relationship between the fluid-bearing petrophysical parameters and the [...] Read more.
In recent years, with the exploration and development of granite buried-hill oil and gas reservoirs, petrophysics research has played an important role in the study of reservoir characteristics and fluid identification. Through analysis of the relationship between the fluid-bearing petrophysical parameters and the reservoir, the seismic response changes caused by reservoir fluid changes can be determined. Mesozoic granites in the coastal area of Fujian Province in eastern China were investigated as the research object of this project. The mineral composition, density, porosity, P-wave velocity, and S-wave velocity of the granite were measured and analyzed by X-ray diffraction, rock density, rock porosity, and rock acoustics methods. Therefore, the granite’s petrophysical properties, fluid response characteristics, and gas sensitivity parameters were analyzed. The result of the study shows that the granite is predominantly monzogranite. According to the type of reservoir space assemblage, the samples can be divided into two types: those containing fracture-dissolution pores and those containing only dissolution pores. All the samples were characterized by medium to high densities and low to extra-low porosity. There was a linear correlation between the P-wave velocity and S-wave velocity under gas and water-saturated conditions. Factors such as P-wave to S-wave velocity ratio, Poisson’s ratio, Lame coefficient, and other parameters of the samples were analyzed, and the threshold values that distinguished the water and gas-saturated states of the samples were measured and determined. In addition, there were negative correlations between the P- and S-wave velocities and porosity. The sensitivities of the petrophysical parameters to the gas capacity from high to low are Ip2 − 2.03 Is2, λ − 0.03 μ, λ, λ/μ, E − 2.03 μ, σ, K/μ, K, Ip, Vp/Vs, Vp, E, μ, Vs, and Is. For granite-buried hill reservoirs, the variation ranges of the parameters, such as the density, porosity, and P-wave velocity, of the fracture-dissolution pore granite samples were larger than those of the dissolution pore samples. The bulk parameters (Ip, Vp, K, λ) and combination parameters (Ip2 − 2.03 Is2, K/μ, λ− 0.03 μ, E − 2.03 μ, λ/μ) of the dissolution pore samples were more sensitive to the gas capacity. The results of this study provide a basis for the geophysical identification of granite-buried hill reservoirs. Full article
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19 pages, 6152 KiB  
Article
Integrated Identification of Lithology Using Seismic and Magnetic Anomaly Data for Granite and Gneiss Basement: A Case Study of the LiShui Depression in the East China Sea Basin
by Haichao Wu, Tao Zhang, Huafeng Tang, Baoliang Lu and Zhe Dong
Minerals 2023, 13(4), 507; https://doi.org/10.3390/min13040507 - 1 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1450
Abstract
Granite and gneiss buried hill reservoirs are controlled by their lithology and dark mineral content. Therefore, lithological identification and dark mineral content analysis are important research tools in the early stage of buried hill exploration. In this paper, the relationships between the seismic [...] Read more.
Granite and gneiss buried hill reservoirs are controlled by their lithology and dark mineral content. Therefore, lithological identification and dark mineral content analysis are important research tools in the early stage of buried hill exploration. In this paper, the relationships between the seismic facies and lithology, magnetic susceptibility, and magnetic anomalies of granite and gneiss are analyzed based on the lithological characteristics of the LiShui depression (LS depression) in the East China Sea Basin (ECSB). The waveform classification method is used to identify granite and gneiss, and the waveform classification results reveal that areas with continuous distribution of a single seismic trace model or two seismic trace models represent good continuity, and can be interpreted as gneiss. Areas with a mixed distribution of multiple seismic trace models represent chaotic and poor continuity, which can be interpreted as granite. The mixed linear zone with multi-seismic trace models is a fault zone, and the rock is cataclasite. In addition, reduction to the pole (RTP) and downward continuation technique for magnetic data processing were used to determine the dark mineral content. Overall, the granite and gneiss can be divided into three types based on magnetic anomaly data: high, moderate, and low magnetic anomaly areas. The areas in which granite with moderate and low magnetic anomalies is distributed are the favorable exploration target areas. The above method provides a technical means of lithological identification in the early stage of buried hill exploration. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. Title: Classification of volcanic reservoir rocks in petroliferous basins

Authors: Weihua Bian

2. Title: Classification of facies of volanic reservoir rocks in petroliferous basins

Authors: Pujun Wang

3. Title: The volcanostratigraphic units in sedimentary basins

Authors: Huafeng Tang

4. Title: Mathematical modelling of volcanic products: volume and distribution aspects

Authors: Hanfei Wang

5. Title: Mapping volcanoes relating to sedimentary basins

Authors: Pujun Wang

6. Title: The stages of volcano-magmatism and its geological significances of the Emeishan Large Igneous Province

Authors: Xuejiao Qu

7. Title: Chronology, geochemistry and geological significance of early Cretaceous volcanic rocks in Songliao Basin, Northeast China

Authors:  Chongyang Chen

8. Title: Petrology of Triassic basement of the Songliao Basin: implications for final closure of the Paleo Asian Ocean

Authors: Yongkang Yin

9. Title: U-Pb isotope geochronology and geochemistry of granites in Songnan low uplift, Qiongdongnan Basin:Constraints on Mesozoic tectonic evolution

Authors: Yanan Liu

10. Title: Pore network and pore structure of volcanic reservoirs

Authors: Yulong Huang

11. Title: Lithology identification and reservoir characteristics of Permian volcanic rocks in the Jianyang area of the Sichuan Basin

Authors: Wenhua Wang

12. Title: Characteristics and quantification of pore network in basaltic reservoirs

Authors: Zheng Zheng

13. Title: Formation and occurrence of zeolites in mafic rocks and their significance to reservoirs of Paleogene in Bohai Bay Basin, NE China

Authors: Hao Zhang

14. Title: The vesicles characteristics of Quaterary Liaohei Volcano in Helongjiang Province, NE China

Authors: Guochao Lu

15. Title: Reservoir physical simulation of compaction of loosen volcaniclastics

Authors: Jiawei Bai

16. Title: Micro-features of pyroclastic hydrocarbon reservoir of the Early Cretaceous Yingcheng Formation, Songliao basin

Authors: Jinjiao Ji

17. Title: Storage capacity of Granite-Type Oil and Gas reservoir affected by mineral composition

Authors: Yan Zhang

18. Title: Reservoir physical simulation of compaction of weathered granite and its wash

Authors: Haichao Wu

19. Title: Diagenetic characteristics and reservoir significance of Permian subaqueous volcanic rocks in Sichuan Basin 

Authors: Youfeng Gao

20. Title: Mineral transformation and corresponding micropore system evolution during the burial process of basalt: a case from Liaohe Depression, Bohai Bay Basin, East China

Authors: Haibo Liu

21. Title: Geophysical characterization of volcanic reservoir in Songliao Basin

Authors: Shuming Chen

22. Title: Geophysical characterization of volcanic reservoir in Liaohe Basin

Authors: Bin Zhang

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