Probiotics and Gut Health of Farm Animals

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Gut Microbiota".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2022) | Viewed by 6969

Special Issue Editors

Institute of Animal Physiology, Centre of Biosciences of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, 4040 01 Košice, Slovakia
Interests: beneficial bacteria; bacteriocins; health; animals; food/feed
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Institute of Animal Physiology, Centre of Biosciences of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, 4040 01 Košice, Slovakia
Interests: enterocins; inhibition; spoilage; bacteria

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The health of farm animals is always of paramount interest, due to the following chain: healthy animals = healthy animal-derived food = meeting consumers demands. Therefore, breeders try to identify ways to fulfill this demand. They look for natural methods to do this, and probiotic/beneficial microbiota are promising candidates for this purpose; in particular, lactic acid bacteria are promising candidates, which are also known to produce antimicrobial substances with a beneficial influence on, for example, the immune status of animals, optimizing their biochemistry, weight gain and/or carcass quality. The innovation of identification techniques allow improved screening of gut microbiota following the application of beneficial microbiota, as well as to note the influences of different parameters with beneficial consequences. With these aspects in mind, the Special Issue will be focused on the following tasks:

  • Character and potential of new probiotic/beneficial strains;
  • Effect of the application of probiotic/beneficial strains in farm animals;
  • Influence of gut microbiota (especially using sequencing techniques);
  • Influence of immunity and physiological parameters;
  • Influence of growth parameters or carcass quality;

Combined application of probiotic microbiota and other substances in farm animals, and their effect (comparison).

Dr. Andrea Lauková
Dr. Jana Ščerbová
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • benefit bacteria
  • bacteriocins
  • health
  • animals
  • food/feed

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 1851 KiB  
Article
Possibility of Using By-Products with High NDF Content to Alter the Fecal Short Chain Fatty Acid Profiles, Bacterial Community, and Digestibility of Lactating Dairy Cows
Microorganisms 2022, 10(9), 1731; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms10091731 - 27 Aug 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1903
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate whether agricultural by-products with a high NDF content and small-particle-size substitute for forage could cause hindgut acidosis and dysbacteriosis in lactating dairy cows. We investigated the impact of soybean hull and beet pulp on the fecal fermentation, bacterial [...] Read more.
This study aimed to investigate whether agricultural by-products with a high NDF content and small-particle-size substitute for forage could cause hindgut acidosis and dysbacteriosis in lactating dairy cows. We investigated the impact of soybean hull and beet pulp on the fecal fermentation, bacterial community, and digestibility of cows. Sixteen lactating Holstein cows were treated as follows (% of dry matter (DM)): amount of by-product added was 0 (control, CON), 1.67% (low by-products, LB), 3.33% (medium by-products, MB), and 5% (high by-products, HB). The results showed the fecal pH of cows to be 7.23–7.29, implying no hindgut acidosis. With increased inclusion of by-products in the diets, the proportion of fecal propionate; relative abundance of the phylum Bacteroidetes, the family Lachnospiraceae, and genera unclassified_f_Lachnospiraceae, Acetitomaculum, and Prevotella; and the DM and NDF digestibility of cows all increased linearly. Meanwhile, the fecal genera Turicibacter and Clostridium_sensu_stricto_1 decreased linearly. By-products promoted the abundance of fecal bacteria genes related to energy metabolism, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, and propanoate metabolism; and correlations between fecal short chain fatty acids, digestibility, and the bacteria genera were seen. Overall, our study suggested that adding 5% by-products could be a viable dietary formulation strategy that promotes digestibility and makes positive changes in hindgut fermentation and bacteria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Probiotics and Gut Health of Farm Animals)
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15 pages, 2169 KiB  
Article
Effects of Bovine Pichia kudriavzevii T7, Candida glabrata B14, and Lactobacillus plantarum Y9 on Milk Production, Quality and Digestive Tract Microbiome in Dairy Cows
Microorganisms 2022, 10(5), 842; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms10050842 - 20 Apr 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1812
Abstract
Microbial administration has been used successfully to improve host health. However, the positive effects of endogenous microbials are still underexplored. This study investigated the effects of bovine Lactic acid bacteria and yeast on the milk production, quality and digestive tract microbiome of dairy [...] Read more.
Microbial administration has been used successfully to improve host health. However, the positive effects of endogenous microbials are still underexplored. This study investigated the effects of bovine Lactic acid bacteria and yeast on the milk production, quality and digestive tract microbiome of dairy cows. Lactobacillus plantarum Y9, Pichia kudriavzevii T7 and Candida glabrata B14 isolated from high-yielding dairy cows were selected to feed low-yielding Holstein cows. Pichia kudriavzevii T7 could significantly increase milk yield, meanwhile, Pichia kudriavzevii T7 and Candida glabrata B14 could obviously reduce the number of somatic cell counts (SCC). However, slight differences were found in milk fat, protein, lactose and SNF (solids not fat) percentage. High throughput sequencing showed that the dominant bacteria were Prevotella and Ruminococcaceae in rumen and feces, respectively, and the dominant fungi were Penicillium, Aspergillus and Trichoderma in both samples, before and after feeding the microbial addition. Nonetheless, microbial addition changed the abundance and structure of the microbiome in the digestive tract. Our data showed bovine yeast and LAB were beneficial for improving performance and regulating the microbial structure of dairy cows. This study was expected to enrich the knowledge of the digestive tract microbiome in dairy cows and provide a feasible strategy for the further utilization of bovine microorganisms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Probiotics and Gut Health of Farm Animals)
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22 pages, 1422 KiB  
Article
Lactobacillus salivarius CML352 Isolated from Chinese Local Breed Chicken Modulates the Gut Microbiota and Improves Intestinal Health and Egg Quality in Late-Phase Laying Hens
Microorganisms 2022, 10(4), 726; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms10040726 - 28 Mar 2022
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 2812
Abstract
Lactobacillus strains with fine probiotic properties are continuously needed in the laying hen industry to improve the animals’ gut health and production performance. In this study, we isolated 57 Lactobacillus strains from the gut microbiota of 17 different chicken breeds in China. We [...] Read more.
Lactobacillus strains with fine probiotic properties are continuously needed in the laying hen industry to improve the animals’ gut health and production performance. In this study, we isolated 57 Lactobacillus strains from the gut microbiota of 17 different chicken breeds in China. We characterized the probiotic features of these isolates, and evaluated the effects of a selected strain, Lactobacillus salivarius CML352, on the production performance and gut health of the late-phase laying hens. The results showed that the isolates varied much in probiotic properties, among which L. salivarius CML352 displayed high acid and bile salt tolerance, high hydrophobicity, auto-aggregation, and antibacterial activities. Whole genome sequencing analysis showed that CML352 was closely related to a strain isolated from human fecal samples, but had different functional potentials. Dietary supplementary of L. salivarius CML352 significantly reduced the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio, increased the expression of Muc-2, and decreased the expression of MyD88, IFN-γ, and TLR-4. Furthermore, strain CML352 reduced the birds’ abdominal fat deposition, and improved egg quality. Taken together, this study indicated that the newly isolated L. salivarius strain might be a worthy probiotic with positive impacts on the intestinal health and production performance of late-phase laying hens. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Probiotics and Gut Health of Farm Animals)
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