Cyclospora cayetanensis and Cyclosporiasis 2.0

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2024 | Viewed by 953

Special Issue Editors

Department of Health and Human Services, Food and Drug Administration, Center for Food Safety and Nutrition (CFSAN), Office of Applied Research and Safety Assessment (OARSA), Division of Virulence Assessment, Laurel, MD 20708, USA
Interests: parasites; foodborne; waterborne; protozoa; Cyclospora; Toxoplasma
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Environmental Microbial and Food Safety Laboratory, USDA ARS, BARC, Beltsville, MD, USA
Interests: zoonotic protozoan parasites; food safety
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Health and Human Services, Food and Drug Administration, Center for Food Safety and Nutrition (CFSAN), Office of Applied Research and Safety Assessment (OARSA), Division of Virulence Assessment, Laurel, MD 20708, USA
Interests: Cyclospora cayetanensis; Caenorhabditis elegans
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is the continuation of our previous special issue "Cyclospora cayetanensis and Cyclosporiasis".

Cyclospora cayetanensis is an emerging and important cause of foodborne outbreaks of enteric disease in many developed countries, which are mostly associated with the consumption of contaminated fresh produce. Infection by C. cayetanensis is remarkably seasonal worldwide, although it varies by geographical regions. The most susceptible populations are children, foreigners, and immunocompromised patients in endemic countries, while in industrialized countries, C. cayetanensis affects people of any age. There are no animal models, and/or in vivo and in vitro culture systems to facilitate C. cayetanensis research, and many of the epidemiological aspects of this parasitic disease remain unknown. In addition, there is an urgent need for an effective genotyping method for source tracking in outbreak investigations. The aim of this Special Issue is to provide a comprehensive, up-to-date overview of the current knowledge on C. cayetanensis and cyclosporiasis, including general biology, molecular biology, diagnosis, epidemiology, outbreaks, clinical disease, treatment, control, and prevention. We welcome research articles, reviews, and short communications related to these topics.

Dr. Sonia Almeria
Dr. Monica Santin
Dr. Hediye Nese Cinar
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • Cyclospora cayetanensis
  • life cycle
  • biology
  • epidemiology
  • endemic areas
  • outbreaks
  • clinical symptoms
  • diagnosis
  • control

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

16 pages, 4735 KiB  
Article
Development and Evaluation/Verification of a Fully Automated Test Platform for the Rapid Detection of Cyclospora cayetanensis in Produce Matrices
Microorganisms 2023, 11(11), 2805; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms11112805 - 19 Nov 2023
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Abstract
Cyclosporiasis, caused by the coccidian parasite Cyclospora cayetanensis, has emerged as an increasing global public health concern, with the incidence of laboratory-confirmed domestically acquired cases in the US exceeding 10,000 since 2018. A recently published qPCR assay (Mit1C) based on a mitochondrial [...] Read more.
Cyclosporiasis, caused by the coccidian parasite Cyclospora cayetanensis, has emerged as an increasing global public health concern, with the incidence of laboratory-confirmed domestically acquired cases in the US exceeding 10,000 since 2018. A recently published qPCR assay (Mit1C) based on a mitochondrial target gene showed high specificity and good sensitivity for the detection of C. cayetanensis in fresh produce. The present study shows the integration and verification of the same mitochondrial target into a fully automated and streamlined platform that performs DNA isolation, PCR, hybridization, results visualization, and reporting of results to simplify and reduce hands-on time for the detection of this parasite. By using the same primer sets for both the target of interest (i.e., Mit1C) and the internal assay control (IAC), we were able to rapidly migrate the previously developed Mit1C qPCR assay into the more streamlined and automated format Rheonix C. cayetanensisTM Assay. Once the best conditions for detection were optimized and the migration to the fully automated format was completed, we compared the performance of the automated platform against the original “bench top” Mit1C qPCR assay. The automated Rheonix C. cayetanensis Assay achieved equivalent performance characteristics as the original assay, including the same performance for both inclusion and exclusion panels, and it was able to detect as low as 5 C. cayetanensis oocysts in fresh produce while significantly reducing hands-on time. We expect that the streamlined assay can be used as a tool for outbreak and/or surveillance activities to detect the presence of C. cayetanensis in produce samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cyclospora cayetanensis and Cyclosporiasis 2.0)
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