Yeasts Biochemistry and Biotechnology, 2nd Edition

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Microbial Biotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 2985

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Grupo EXPRELA, Centro de Investigacións Científicas Avanzadas (CICA), Departamento de Bioloxía, Facultade de Ciencias, Universidade da Coruña, 15071 A Corunna, Spain
Interests: yeasts; functional metagenomics; thermophiles; thermozymes; protein engineering
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Grupo EXPRELA, Centro de Investigacións Científicas Avanzadas (CICA), Departamento de Bioloxía, Facultade de Ciencias, Universidade da Coruña, 15071 A Corunna, Spain
Interests: yeasts; functional metagenomics; thermophiles and thermozymes; structure and function of proteins; protein engineering
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Yeasts are eukaryotic unicellular microorganisms of the fungi kingdom that have served mankind since ancient times. The most-studied yeast hitherto is Saccharomyces cerevisiae, whose genome was the first eukaryotic one fully sequenced, and which was a pioneer in the development of genetic engineering and gene editing tools. It has been used as a simple model for research in metabolism, physiology, gene regulation, diseases, etc. At the same time, it has been the main protagonist of the biotechnological industry, providing recombinant proteins, biofuels, and several other bioproducts. Other yeast species, called non-conventional species, have been arising in the scientific world due to their differential characteristics compared with S. cerevisiae, such as the utilization of a wider variety of carbon sources, including waste materials, different respiro-fermentative metabolisms, different glycosylation patterns of recombinant proteins, etc.

The aim of this Special Issue is to provide a multidisciplinary space to share valuable information about recent research (basic and applied) on yeasts and using yeasts as tools, from the genome to the proteins (native and recombinant) and other bioproducts. Studies of S. cerevisiae and non-conventional yeasts are both welcome, as well as articles about the history of yeast research.

As Guest Editors of this Special Issue, we invite you to submit research articles, review articles, and short communications related to recent advances in yeast research.

Dr. María-Isabel González-Siso
Dr. Manuel Becerra
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Microorganisms is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • yeast
  • eukaryote model
  • biotechnology
  • recombinant protein
  • bioproduction
  • protein engineering

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

25 pages, 4038 KiB  
Review
Biosynthesis Progress of High-Energy-Density Liquid Fuels Derived from Terpenes
by Jiajia Liu, Man Lin, Penggang Han, Ge Yao and Hui Jiang
Microorganisms 2024, 12(4), 706; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms12040706 - 30 Mar 2024
Viewed by 968
Abstract
High-energy-density liquid fuels (HED fuels) are essential for volume-limited aerospace vehicles and could serve as energetic additives for conventional fuels. Terpene-derived HED biofuel is an important research field for green fuel synthesis. The direct extraction of terpenes from natural plants is environmentally unfriendly [...] Read more.
High-energy-density liquid fuels (HED fuels) are essential for volume-limited aerospace vehicles and could serve as energetic additives for conventional fuels. Terpene-derived HED biofuel is an important research field for green fuel synthesis. The direct extraction of terpenes from natural plants is environmentally unfriendly and costly. Designing efficient synthetic pathways in microorganisms to achieve high yields of terpenes shows great potential for the application of terpene-derived fuels. This review provides an overview of the current research progress of terpene-derived HED fuels, surveying terpene fuel properties and the current status of biosynthesis. Additionally, we systematically summarize the engineering strategies for biosynthesizing terpenes, including mining and engineering terpene synthases, optimizing metabolic pathways and cell-level optimization, such as the subcellular localization of terpene synthesis and adaptive evolution. This article will be helpful in providing insight into better developing terpene-derived HED fuels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Yeasts Biochemistry and Biotechnology, 2nd Edition)
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38 pages, 5034 KiB  
Review
Komagataella phaffii as a Platform for Heterologous Expression of Enzymes Used for Industry
by Tamara M. Khlebodarova, Natalia V. Bogacheva, Andrey V. Zadorozhny, Alla V. Bryanskaya, Asya R. Vasilieva, Danil O. Chesnokov, Elena I. Pavlova and Sergey E. Peltek
Microorganisms 2024, 12(2), 346; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms12020346 - 7 Feb 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1636
Abstract
In the 1980s, Escherichia coli was the preferred host for heterologous protein expression owing to its capacity for rapid growth in complex media; well-studied genetics; rapid and direct transformation with foreign DNA; and easily scalable fermentation. Despite the relative ease of use of [...] Read more.
In the 1980s, Escherichia coli was the preferred host for heterologous protein expression owing to its capacity for rapid growth in complex media; well-studied genetics; rapid and direct transformation with foreign DNA; and easily scalable fermentation. Despite the relative ease of use of E. coli for achieving the high expression of many recombinant proteins, for some proteins, e.g., membrane proteins or proteins of eukaryotic origin, this approach can be rather ineffective. Another microorganism long-used and popular as an expression system is baker’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In spite of a number of obvious advantages of these yeasts as host cells, there are some limitations on their use as expression systems, for example, inefficient secretion, misfolding, hyperglycosylation, and aberrant proteolytic processing of proteins. Over the past decade, nontraditional yeast species have been adapted to the role of alternative hosts for the production of recombinant proteins, e.g., Komagataella phaffii, Yarrowia lipolytica, and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. These yeast species’ several physiological characteristics (that are different from those of S. cerevisiae), such as faster growth on cheap carbon sources and higher secretion capacity, make them practical alternative hosts for biotechnological purposes. Currently, the K. phaffii-based expression system is one of the most popular for the production of heterologous proteins. Along with the low secretion of endogenous proteins, K. phaffii efficiently produces and secretes heterologous proteins in high yields, thereby reducing the cost of purifying the latter. This review will discuss practical approaches and technological solutions for the efficient expression of recombinant proteins in K. phaffii, mainly based on the example of enzymes used for the feed industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Yeasts Biochemistry and Biotechnology, 2nd Edition)
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