Advances in Microbial Biofilm Formation

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Biofilm".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 3381

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology (MTC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
Interests: microbial biofilm formation; cyclic di-nucleotide signaling; pathogen-host interaction; protein quality control; Salmonella typhimurium; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Candida parapsilosis
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is the continuation of our Special Issue “Feature Papers in Microbial Biofilm Formation”.

Microbial biofilm formation, the coordinated assembly of self-replicating cells into multicellular communities, emerged at least 3.5 billion years ago and is an ancient prototype of tissue-like structures connected by an extracellular matrix that arose in order to more efficiently meet metabolic, physiological, and environmental challenges. As challenges can be met under almost or even all circumstances, biofilm formation of microorganisms is even today ubiquitous and diverse. Although beneficial in many settings such as biofilm formation of microorganisms in the global terrestrial biosphere, of the commensal flora, and of microbes in wastewater treatment, and much more common, detrimental biofilm formation can also occur in clinical, industrial, and agricultural settings can implement undesirable long-term consequences. Due to the complexity of multicellular aggregate formation, theoretical and experimental approaches from different disciplines need to tackle the various aspects of biofilm formation. In this volume of featured papers, some of the diverse aspects of biofilm research will be addressed. 

Prof. Dr. Ute Römling
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Microorganisms is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • commensal
  • environment
  • metabolism
  • multi-disciplinarity
  • pathogen
  • second messenger signaling

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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17 pages, 4259 KiB  
Article
Genetic Insights into Biofilm Formation by a Pathogenic Strain of Vibrio harveyi
by Amandine Morot, François Delavat, Alexis Bazire, Christine Paillard, Alain Dufour and Sophie Rodrigues
Microorganisms 2024, 12(1), 186; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms12010186 - 17 Jan 2024
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Abstract
The Vibrio genus includes bacteria widely distributed in aquatic habitats and the infections caused by these bacteria can affect a wide range of hosts. They are able to adhere to numerous surfaces, which can result in biofilm formation that helps maintain them in [...] Read more.
The Vibrio genus includes bacteria widely distributed in aquatic habitats and the infections caused by these bacteria can affect a wide range of hosts. They are able to adhere to numerous surfaces, which can result in biofilm formation that helps maintain them in the environment. The involvement of the biofilm lifestyle in the virulence of Vibrio pathogens of aquatic organisms remains to be investigated. Vibrio harveyi ORM4 is a pathogen responsible for an outbreak in European abalone Haliotis tuberculata populations. In the present study, we used a dynamic biofilm culture technique coupled with laser scanning microscopy to characterize the biofilm formed by V. harveyi ORM4. We furthermore used RNA-seq analysis to examine the global changes in gene expression in biofilm cells compared to planktonic bacteria, and to identify biofilm- and virulence-related genes showing altered expression. A total of 1565 genes were differentially expressed, including genes associated with motility, polysaccharide synthesis, and quorum sensing. The up-regulation of 18 genes associated with the synthesis of the type III secretion system suggests that this virulence factor is induced in V. harveyi ORM4 biofilms, providing indirect evidence of a relationship between biofilm and virulence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Microbial Biofilm Formation)
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Review

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18 pages, 1512 KiB  
Review
Review of the Impact of Biofilm Formation on Recurrent Clostridioides difficile Infection
by Daira Rubio-Mendoza, Adrián Martínez-Meléndez, Héctor Jesús Maldonado-Garza, Carlos Córdova-Fletes and Elvira Garza-González
Microorganisms 2023, 11(10), 2525; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms11102525 - 10 Oct 2023
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Abstract
Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) may recur in approximately 10–30% of patients, and the risk of recurrence increases with each successive recurrence, reaching up to 65%. C. difficile can form biofilm with approximately 20% of the bacterial genome expressed differently between biofilm and planktonic [...] Read more.
Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) may recur in approximately 10–30% of patients, and the risk of recurrence increases with each successive recurrence, reaching up to 65%. C. difficile can form biofilm with approximately 20% of the bacterial genome expressed differently between biofilm and planktonic cells. Biofilm plays several roles that may favor recurrence; for example, it may act as a reservoir of spores, protect the vegetative cells from the activity of antibiotics, and favor the formation of persistent cells. Moreover, the expression of several virulence genes, including TcdA and TcdB toxins, has been associated with recurrence. Several systems and structures associated with adhesion and biofilm formation have been studied in C. difficile, including cell-wall proteins, quorum sensing (including LuxS and Agr), Cyclic di-GMP, type IV pili, and flagella. Most antibiotics recommended for the treatment of CDI do not have activity on spores and do not eliminate biofilm. Therapeutic failure in R-CDI has been associated with the inadequate concentration of drugs in the intestinal tract and the antibiotic resistance of a biofilm. This makes it challenging to eradicate C. difficile in the intestine, complicating antibacterial therapies and allowing non-eliminated spores to remain in the biofilm, increasing the risk of recurrence. In this review, we examine the role of biofilm on recurrence and the challenges of treating CDI when the bacteria form a biofilm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Microbial Biofilm Formation)
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