Optical and Laser Material Processing

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "D:Materials and Processing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 2676

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203, USA
Interests: nanophotonics; laser holographic fabrication; 2D materials

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203, USA
Interests: nanophotonics; ultra-fast laser; quantum plasmonics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Products and services based on nanotechnology are becoming increasingly important to our economy, and so is the optical and laser processing and manufacturing technology that produces them. Two- and three-dimensional nanofabrication can be addressed using both top-down and bottom-up approaches. Bottom-up approaches have enabled large-scale additive and selective laser manufacturing. Top-down methods (including EUV lithography) have resulted in computer chip manufacturing. Combining top-down and bottom-up approaches can facilitate the integration of different dimensions and scales in optical and laser material processing, including the direct laser writing of 2D-layered materials in pattern. Thus, this Special Issue seeks to showcase research papers and reviews on new developments in optical and laser material processing for micro- and nano-scale manufacturing.

We look forward to receiving your submissions!

Prof. Dr. Yuankun Lin
Dr. Yuzhe Xiao
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Micromachines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • material-based micro/nano structures and devices
  • optical and laser material processing
  • optical- and laser-based nano/micro-fabrication
  • 2D and bulk material processing

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 6962 KiB  
Article
Enhancing the Spin Hall Effect of Cylindrically Polarized Beams
by Alexey A. Kovalev, Anton G. Nalimov and Victor V. Kotlyar
Micromachines 2024, 15(3), 350; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi15030350 - 29 Feb 2024
Viewed by 736
Abstract
Two linked gear wheels in a micromachine can be simultaneously rotated in opposite directions by using a laser beam that has in its section areas the spin angular momentum (SAM) of the opposite sign. However, for instance, a cylindrical vector beam has zero [...] Read more.
Two linked gear wheels in a micromachine can be simultaneously rotated in opposite directions by using a laser beam that has in its section areas the spin angular momentum (SAM) of the opposite sign. However, for instance, a cylindrical vector beam has zero SAM in the focus. We alter a cylindrical vector beam so as to generate areas in its focus where the SAM is of opposite signs. The first alteration is adding to the cylindrical vector beam a linearly polarized beam. Thus, we study superposition of two rotationally symmetric beams: those with cylindrical and linear polarization. We obtain an expression for the SAM and prove two of its properties. The first property is that changing superposition coefficients does not change the shape of the SAM density distribution, whereas the intensity changes. The second property is that maximal SAM density is achieved when both beams in the superposition have the same energy. The second perturbation is adding a spatial carrier frequency. We study the SAM density of a cylindrical vector beam with a spatial carrier frequency. Due to periodic modulation, upon propagation in space, such a beam is split into two beams, having left and right elliptic polarization. Thus, in the beam transverse section, areas with the spin of different signs are separated in space, which is a manifestation of the spin Hall effect. We demonstrate that such light beams can be generated by metasurfaces, with the transmittance depending periodically on one coordinate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical and Laser Material Processing)
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12 pages, 8869 KiB  
Article
Hydrophobic Surface Array Structure Based on Laser-Induced Graphene for Deicing and Anti-Icing Applications
by Mian Zhong, Shichen Li, Yao Zou, Hongyun Fan, Yong Jiang, Chao Qiu, Jinling Luo and Liang Yang
Micromachines 2024, 15(2), 285; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi15020285 - 17 Feb 2024
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 949
Abstract
The exceptional performance of graphene has driven the advancement of its preparation techniques and applications. Laser-induced graphene (LIG), as a novel graphene preparation technique, has been applied in various fields. Graphene periodic structures created by the LIG technique exhibit superhydrophobic characteristics and can [...] Read more.
The exceptional performance of graphene has driven the advancement of its preparation techniques and applications. Laser-induced graphene (LIG), as a novel graphene preparation technique, has been applied in various fields. Graphene periodic structures created by the LIG technique exhibit superhydrophobic characteristics and can be used for deicing and anti-icing applications, which are significantly influenced by the laser parameters. The laser surface treatment process was simulated by a finite element software analysis (COMSOL Multiphysics) to optimize the scanning parameter range, and the linear array surface structure was subsequently fabricated by the LIG technique. The generation of graphene was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The periodic linear array structure was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser imaging (CLSM). In addition, CLSM testings, contact angle measurements, and delayed icing experiments were systematically performed to investigate the effect of scanning speed on surface hydrophobicity. The results show that high-quality and uniform graphene can be achieved using the laser scanning speed of 125 mm/s. The periodic linear array structures can obviously increase the contact angle and suppress delayed icing. Furthermore, these structures have the enhanced ability of the electric heating deicing, which can reach 100 °C and 240 °C within 15 s and within 60 s under the DC voltage power supply ranging from 3 to 7 V, respectively. These results indicate that the LIG technique can be developed to provide an efficient, economical, and convenient approach for preparing graphene and that the hydrophobic surface array structure based on LIG has considerable potential for deicing and anti-icing applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical and Laser Material Processing)
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12 pages, 2144 KiB  
Article
Selective CW Laser Synthesis of MoS2 and Mixture of MoS2 and MoO2 from (NH4)2MoS4 Film
by Noah Hurley, Bhojraj Bhandari, Steve Kamau, Roberto Gonzalez Rodriguez, Brian Squires, Anupama B. Kaul, Jingbiao Cui and Yuankun Lin
Micromachines 2024, 15(2), 258; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi15020258 - 9 Feb 2024
Viewed by 776
Abstract
Very recently, the synthesis of 2D MoS2 and WS2 through pulsed laser-directed thermolysis can achieve wafer-scale and large-area structures, in ambient conditions. In this paper, we report the synthesis of MoS2 and MoS2 oxides from (NH4)2 [...] Read more.
Very recently, the synthesis of 2D MoS2 and WS2 through pulsed laser-directed thermolysis can achieve wafer-scale and large-area structures, in ambient conditions. In this paper, we report the synthesis of MoS2 and MoS2 oxides from (NH4)2MoS4 film using a visible continuous-wave (CW) laser at 532 nm, instead of the infrared pulsed laser for the laser-directed thermolysis. The (NH4)2MoS4 film is prepared by dissolving its crystal powder in DI water, sonicating the solution, and dip-coating onto a glass slide. We observed a laser intensity threshold for the laser synthesis of MoS2, however, it occurred in a narrow laser intensity range. Above that range, a mixture of MoS2 and MoO2 is formed, which can be used for a memristor device, as demonstrated by other research groups. We did not observe a mixture of MoS2 and MoO3 in the laser thermolysis of (NH4)2MoS4. The laser synthesis of MoS2 in a line pattern is also achieved through laser scanning. Due to of the ease of CW beam steering and the fine control of laser intensities, this study can lead toward the CW laser-directed thermolysis of (NH4)2MoS4 film for the fast, non-vacuum, patternable, and wafer-scale synthesis of 2D MoS2. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical and Laser Material Processing)
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